Joan Sales - Winds of the Night - Quercus

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  • Paperback £14.99
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    • ISBN:9780857056160
    • Publication date:05 Oct 2017
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    • ISBN:9780857056184
    • Publication date:05 Oct 2017

Winds of the Night

By Joan Sales

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

"Perhaps the worst thing about war is the peace that follows . . ." The follow-up to Uncertain Glory, the acclaimed masterpiece of the Spanish Civil War

"Perhaps the worst thing about war is the peace that follows . . ."

Winds of the Night is the follow-up, published almost thirty years later, to Joan Sales' acclaimed masterwork of the Spanish Civil War, Uncertain Glory.

It describes the shell-shocked wasteland that was post-war Catalonia through the eyes of Cruells, a Republican chaplain who survives the war, and completes his theological studies only to lose his faith in a world where it seems all hope has been extinguished.

As he struggles to function as a rural priest, his steps are dogged by a ghostly figures from his past, such as Lamoneda, a fascist agent provocateur who now hobnobs with Himmler and misses few opportunities to turn the febrile post-war atmosphere to his financial advantage.

Against his wishes, Creulls is drawn into obsessive dialogues about the war in which only lunacy prevails, for Lamoneda seems to hold the key to the whereabouts of an old friend - the mercurial Juli Soleràs, whose charisma, for all his betrayals, still holds Cruells in thrall.

An essential coda to the modern classic that is Uncertain Glory, Winds of the Night is a Beckettian vision of the traumas of combatants and country hidden beneath the rhetoric of the victors.

Translated from the Catalan by Peter Bush

Biographical Notes

Joan Sales (1912-1983) was a Catalan writer, translator and publisher. He obtained a Law degree in 1932 and was a member of regional anarchist and communist groups. In the Civil War he fought on the Madrid and Aragonese fronts before going into exile in France in 1939. He moved to Mexico in 1942, returning to Catalonia in 1948, after which he began working as a publisher. Uncertain Glory, his crucial testament, was first published in 1956, though a combination of censorship and Sales' tendency towards revision meant that a definitive edition was not available until many years later.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780857056177
  • Publication date: 05 Oct 2017
  • Page count: 224
  • Imprint: MacLehose Press
Magnificent . . . Peter Bush and MacLehose Press have done a great service in reviving this Catalan classic. — Maya Jaggi, Guardian.
Wonderfully readable . . . Uncertain Glory is a major novel that expresses the disillusion of a generation who fought a just war against fascism, but lost their idealism and youth. — Michael Eaude, Literary Review.
A masterwork that will seduce anew with its passion, humour, pathos and the all-too-human spats of anger. — Eileen Battersby, Irish Times.
In this bravura novel of the Spanish Civil War, Catalan author Joan Sales evokes its messy, devastating lived reality, but even more memorably the intense feeling of being alive which war paradoxically produces... at the novel's core is a group of young 'voices', brilliantly rendered, as they rage to live. — History Today.
MacLehose Press

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