Related to: 'Q&A with Elly and Keith Walters'

Quercus

The Stranger Diaries

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

THE TIMES CRIME BOOK OF THE YEARTHE RADIO 2 BOOK CLUB PICK'Utterly bewitching ... a pitch-perfect modern Gothic' AJ FINN, author of THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW'Compelling, intelligent and increasingly mesmerising' PETER JAMES'At once a homage to the Gothic thriller, and a re-imagining, it is goose-bump spooky, smart, and haunting, in every sense. I loved this book! And you will too' LOUISE PENNYA dark story has been brought to terrifying life. Can the ending be rewritten in time?Clare Cassidy is no stranger to tales of murder. As a literature teacher specialising in the Gothic writer R.M. Holland, she teaches a short course on them every year. Then Clare's life and work collide tragically when one of her colleagues is found dead, a line from an R.M. Holland story by her body. The investigating police detective is convinced the writer's works somehow hold the key to the case.Not knowing who to trust, and afraid that the killer is someone she knows, Clare confides her darkest suspicions and fears about the case to her journal. Then one day she notices some other writing in the diary. Writing that isn't hers...

Quercus

The Last Act of Hattie Hoffman

Mindy Mejia
Authors:
Mindy Mejia
Quercus

The Woman In Blue

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

The murder of women priests in Norfolk's spooky shrine town of Walsingham draws forensic archaeologist Dr Ruth Galloway into a thrilling new adventure. 'Ever-more ingenious detective stories with a powerful sense of place' The TimesWhen Ruth's friend Cathbad sees a vision of the Virgin Mary, in a white gown and blue cloak, in Walsingham's graveyard, he takes it in his stride. Walsingham has strong connections to Mary, and Cathbad is a druid after all; visions come with the job. But when the body of a woman in a blue dressing-gown is found dead the next day in a nearby ditch, it is clear that a horrible crime has been committed, and DCI Nelson and his team are called in for what is now a murder investigation.Ruth, a devout atheist, has managed to avoid Walsingham during her seventeen years in Norfolk. But then an old university friend asks to meet her in the village, and Ruth is amazed to discover that she is now a priest. She has been receiving vitriolic anonymous letters targeting women priests - letters containing references to local archaeology and a striking phrase about a woman 'clad in blue, weeping for the world'.Then another woman is murdered - a priest. As Walsingham prepares for its annual Easter re-enactment of the Crucifixion, the race is on to unmask the killer before they strike again...

Quercus

The House at Sea's End

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WNNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. The shadow of the Second World War looms dark over the third chilling mystery for Dr Ruth Galloway. Some buried secrets shouldn't be uncovered.'A melancholy setting, an eerie discovery, a lone investigator... perfect for the long winter evening' Financial TimesDr Ruth Galloway is called in by a team of archaeologists investigating coastal erosion on the north Norfolk coast, when they unearth six bodies buried at the foot of a cliff. They seem to have been there a very long time. Ruth must help discover how long, and how on earth they got there. Ruth and DCI Nelson are drawn together once more to unravel the past. Tests reveal that the bodies have lain, preserved in the sand, for sixty years. The mystery of their deaths stretches back to the Second World War, a time when Great Britain was threatened by invasion. Ruth thought she knew the history of Norfolk - she's about to find out just how wrong she was, and how far someone will go to keep their secrets buried.

Quercus

The Ghost Fields

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

Ruth Galloway: The Early Cases

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

The first three cases in Elly Griffiths' bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway mystery series. THE CROSSING PLACES. Ruth Galloway is called upon by DCI Nelson to investigate human remains found in the Norfolk marshes, thought to be those of a missing girl about whom the police having been receiving some very strange letters. THE JANUS STONE. Bones are unearthed on the site of an old children's home. Two children had gone missing from the home forty years previously... but the evidence points to a different crime altogether. THE HOUSE AT SEA'S END. Ruth Galloway and DCI Nelson find themselves investigating a hideous crime that has been concealed for decades. And it soon becomes clear that someone wants the truth to stay buried, and they will go to any lengths to keep it that way.'Ruth Galloway is one of the most engaging characters in modern crime fiction' - Kate Mosse

Quercus

The Outcast Dead

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

Ruth's First Christmas Tree

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

It is three days before Christmas and a bitter wind is blowing across Norfolk.Until her daughter was born, forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway didn't do Christmas, but now that Kate is a year old, she wants it to be special. She must get a tree, shop for food, clean the house, buy presents, including one for her new boyfriend - who she isn't even sure is her boyfriend - and remember to get the turkey out of the freezer.But time is rushing by and the best-laid plans don't always work out...

Quercus

A Room Full of Bones

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

The Crossing Places

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

A child's bones are discovered on the windswept Norfolk marshes. Believing them to be ancient, the police call in Dr Ruth Galloway, forensic archaeologist. But this is no prehistoric grave. It seems a cold missing person case has now become a murder investigation.'I've never before read a crime novel in which [archaeology and detection] blend as successfully as in The Crossing Places' Shots Dr Ruth Galloway is called in when a child's bones are discovered near the site of a prehistoric henge on the north Norfolk salt marshes. Are they the remains of a local girl who disappeared ten years earlier - or are the bones much older?DCI Harry Nelson refuses to give up the hunt for the missing girl. Since she vanished, someone has been sending him bizarre anonymous notes about ritual sacrifice, quoting Shakespeare and the Bible. He knows that Ruth's expertise and experience could help him finally to put this case to rest. But when a second child goes missing, Ruth finds herself in danger from a killer who knows she's getting ever closer to the truth...

A Room Full of Bones Review

A Room Full of Bones marks the fourth appearance of Elly Griffiths’s heroine Dr Ruth Galloway, forensic archeologist and resident of Norfolk. A museum curator is found dead just before a ceremony to open a recently discovered coffin containing the bones of a medieval bishop. The museum’s owner, a wealthy racehorse trainer, has received a threatening demand to return a collection of bones to the Aboriginal people from whom they were stolen; he doesn’t, and dies.

14 Sep
St Andrews

Philip Kerr with The Lady From Zagreb in Toppings St Andrews

7:30pm

Philip Kerr with The Lady From Zagreb in Toppings St Andrews

14 Sep
St Andrews

Philip Kerr with The Lady From Zagreb in Toppings St Andrews

7:30pm

Philip Kerr with The Lady From Zagreb in Toppings St Andrews

13 Sep
Stirling

Philip Kerr and Ian Rankin at Bloody Scotland

3:15pm

Philip Kerr and Ian Rankin at Bloody Scotland

13 Sep
Stirling

Philip Kerr and Ian Rankin at Bloody Scotland

3:15pm

Philip Kerr and Ian Rankin at Bloody Scotland

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Jessica Cornwell talks about her inspiration for writing her new novel, The Serpent Papers.

Writing The Serpent Papers

When I set out to write a novel, the first thing I encountered in the dark recess of my imagination was a man. His name was Ferran Fons, and he was a lonely, aging, professor at a drama school in Barcelona. Fons had an office window facing the theatre across the courtyard and so he spent the majority of his day staring at an enormous poster hanging from the wall of the building. The poster featured a portrait of a beautiful young woman. Her name – I knew in a flash – was Natalia Hernandez. And very soon she was going to die. In the weeks and months following my discovery of Natalia Hernandez, I found myself writing a mystery. New characters sprang into being – the irascible Inspector Fabregat with his love of rich food and distaste for murder – tormented by the unsolved deaths of four young women, bodies tattooed with cryptic letters, tongues cut from their mouths. Next came Rex Illuminatus: a thirteenth century Majorcan mystic who hid The Serpent Papers beneath an alchemical scrawl, secreting away an ancient manuscript written in the language of witches. Anna Verco presented herself as a young, American academic whose psychic abilities and quest to find the Serpent Papers lead her into the drawing room of Inspector Fabregat… a decade after the murder of Natalia Hernandez. I had not set out to write a thriller, but suddenly I was. Not only that, but I knew, without doubt, upon finding Anna, that I was also writing a trilogy. I read and reread the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. While making notes in the margin of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet, I repeatedly returned to Wilkie Collin’s The Moonstone and the gothic novels of Horace Walpole and Mary Shelley. I wanted to write a contemporary thriller that had its roots in nineteenth century crime, so I analyzed the structure of the gothic novel, and decided that the first pulp books had evolved into vampire stories and then into serial killer narratives. I set the book in Barcelona’s gothic quarters, with its air of supernatural menace. Amidst the distinct flavor of an old, and violent, fairy tale – I saw Anna Vero driving the action forward. I loved her feminism, her single mindedness, her independence and focus, and how little she wanted to share of herself. Anna takes her lead from The Killing’s Sarah Lund, The Bridge’s Saga Norén (with whom I am completely obsessed) and Lisbeth Salander – the queens of Scandi Noir – but she’s also a very different interpretation of the genre’s damaged ‘woman detective’ or female protagonist. She blends the supernatural and the hyper-real, and in that way I think she’s quite original – and genre-bending. She also consistently surprises me, leading me on unexpected adventures into Palaeography courses at Senate House in London, the Manuscript room at the British Library, and up rocky Majorcan trails in the pouring rain. Throughout, Anna Verco remains deliciously, autonomously her own.

02 Oct
Henley-on-Thames

Philip Kerr and Jane Thynne at Henley Literary Festival

4:30pm

Philip Kerr and Jane Thynne at Henley Literary Festival

02 Oct
Henley-on-Thames

Philip Kerr and Jane Thynne at Henley Literary Festival

4:30pm

Philip Kerr and Jane Thynne at Henley Literary Festival

13 Sep
Chiswick

Laura Wilson at Chiswick Book Festival

1:30pm

Chiswick Festival