index
Our Authors
Corban Addison

Corban Addison holds degrees in law and engineering. After completing a federal clerkship, Addison began his career specializing in corporate law and litigation. He has an abiding interest in international human rights, and is a supporter of numerous causes, including the abolition of modern slavery. He lives with his wife and two children in Virginia. He is the author of A Walk Across the Sun, The Garden of Burning Sand and The Tears of Dark Water.
Jussi Adler-Olsen

Jussi Adler-Olsen is Denmark's number one crime writer and a New York Times bestseller. His books routinely top the bestseller lists in Europe and have sold more than sixteen million copies around the world. His many prestigious Nordic crime-writing awards include the Glass Key Award, also won by Henning Mankell, Jo Nesbø and Stieg Larsson.
John Ajvide Lindqvist

John Ajvide Lindqvist is a Swedish author, born in 1968. He grew up in Blackeberg, a suburb of Stockholm. He wanted to become something awful and fantastic. First he became a conjurer and came in second in the Nordic card trick championship. Then he was a stand-up comedian for twelve years, before writing Let the Right One In. That novel became a phenomenal international bestseller and was made into a film and a West End play, both called Let Me In. His books are published in twenty-nine countries worldwide.
Muhsin Al-Ramli

Muhsin Al-Ramli is an Iraqi writer, poet, academic and translator, born in the village of Sudara in northern Iraq in 1967. He has lived in Madrid since 1995. The President's Gardens was longlisted for the IPAF, known as the "Arabic Booker", in 2013.
Karin Altenberg

Karin Altenberg was born in Sweden and moved to Britain to study in 1996. She holds a PhD in Archaeology. Her first, bestselling novel, Island of Wings, was shortlisted for the Saltire First Book Award and the Scottish Book of the Year Award and was longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction.
Steven Amsterdam

Steven Amsterdam is a writer and palliative care nurse. Originally from New York City, he now lives in Melbourne. His most recent novel about assisted suicide, The Easy Way Out, has enjoyed critical acclaim in both the UK and Australia, and has been long-listed for the Miles Franklin Literary Award. His first book Things We Didn't See Coming was long-listed for the Guardian First Book Award. His second book, What the Family Needed was longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.
Lucy Atkins

Lucy Atkins is an award-winning feature journalist and author, as well as a Sunday Times book critic. She has written for many newspapers, including the Guardian, The Times, The Sunday Times, and the Telegraph, as well as magazines such as Psychologies, Red, Woman and Home and Grazia. She lives in Oxford.
Bernardo Atxaga

Bernardo Atxaga was born in Gipuzkoa in Spain in 1951 and lives in the Basque Country, writing in Basque and Spanish. He is a prizewinning novelist and poet, whose books, including Obabakoak (1992), The Accordionist's Son (2007) and most recently Seven Houses in France (2012), have won critical acclaim in Spain and abroad. His works have been translated into twenty-two languages.
Murray Bail

Born in Adelaide in 1941, Murray Bail now lives in Sydney. His fiction, which includes Eucalyptus, Holden's Performance, Homesickness and The Drover's Wife and Other Stories, has been translated into more than twenty-five languages, winning a number of major awards.
Elia Barceló

Elia Barceló was born in Alicante in 1957 and teaches Spanish Language and Literature at the University of Innsbruck. She made her name in science-fiction, but with books such as Heart of Tango she is fast gaining the wider readership that she so richly deserves. David Frye's translations include Thine Is the Kingdom (1999) and Distant Palaces (2004) by Cuban novelist Abilio Estévez, and The Curriculum Vitae of Aurora Ortiz (2005) by Spanish novelist Almudena Solana.
Alberto Barrera Tyszka

Alberto Barrera Tyszka, poet and novelist, is well known in Venezuela for his Sunday column in the newspaper El Nacional. He co-wrote the internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed Hugo Chávez (2007), the first biography of the Venezuelan president. The Sickness won the prestigious Premio Herralde. Margaret Jull Costa has translated many Portuguese, Spanish and Latin American writers, amongst them José Saramago, Mário de Sá-Carneiro and José Régio. She was joint-winner of the Portuguese Translation Prize in 1992, and won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 1997.
Laura Barton

Laura Barton was born in Lancashire in 1977, and now lives in London. She has been a journalist at the Guardian since 2000, and has also written for Q, the Word, Intelligent Life and Radio 4.
Bernard Beckett

Bernard Beckett, born in 1967, is a high school teacher based in Wellington, New Zealand, where he teaches Drama, Mathematics and English. Genesis was written while he was on a Royal Society genetics research fellowship investigating DNA mutations. Genesis won the Young Adult Fiction category of the New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children and Young Adults 2007 and the 2007 Esther Glen award.
Anna Bell

Anna Bell currently writes the weekly column 'The Secret Dreamworld of An Aspiring Author' on the website Novelicious. She is a full-time writer and loves nothing more than going for walks with her husband and Labrador.
Anthea Bell

Anthea Bell
Daisy Bell

Daisy Bell lives in London. She loves baking gingerbread and decorating the Christmas tree, but always leaves the gift-wrapping until the last possible moment!
Georges-Marc Benamou

Georges-Marc Benamou is a journalist, who had unprecedented access to François Mitterand for three years. His subsequent bestselling book scandalized France. He has since turned it into a film. He lives in France
Joanna Bolouri

Joanna Bolouri worked in sales before she began writing professionally at the age of thirty. Winning a BBC comedy script competition allowed her to work and write with stand-up comedians, comedy scriptwriters and actors from across the UK. She's had articles and reviews published in The Skinny, the Scottish Sun, the Huffington Post and HecklerSpray. She lives in Glasgow with her daughter.
Barbara Bourland

Barbara Bourland lives in Baltimore, MD. I'll Eat When I'm Dead is her first novel. Formerly, she was a freelance writer for Forbes Traveler, Condé Nast Digital's Concierge.com, and a web producer for O, The Oprah Magazine and OWN, The Oprah Winfrey Network.
Hilary Boyd

Hilary Boyd trained as a nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital, then as a marriage guidance counselor. After a degree in English Literature at London University in her thirties, she moved into health journalism, writing a Mind, Body, Spirit column for the Daily Express. She published six non-fiction books on health-related subjects before turning to fiction and writing a string of bestsellers, starting with Thursdays in the Park. Hilary is married to film director/producer Don Boyd and lives near Chichester, West Sussex.