index
Our Authors
Robert B. Parker

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Robert B. Parker completed a Ph.D. in English at Boston University. He married his wife Joan in 1956. He began writing his Spencer novels while teaching at Boston's North-eastern University in 1971. In 1997 he wrote his first Jesse Stone novel, Night Passage. Parker was named Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 2002.
Robert B. Strassler

Robert B. Strassler is an independent scholar and the editor of the widely praised Landmark Thucydides. John Marincola is a highly respected classical scholar and Leon Golden Professor of Classics at Florida State University.
Emma Bache

The UK's leading handwriting expert, Emma Bache has worked as a graphologist since 1989, analysing handwriting in both the Corporate and private sectors. With additional qualifications in Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy, Emma has helped to solve cases of fraud for both private individuals and the corporate world, giving a valuable insight into the criminal mind. She has had her own columns in The Times and the Financial Times and has written for other major publications such as the Daily Mail, the Daily Telegraph, the Guardian and Cosmopolitan. She has made frequent TV and Radio appearances, including GMTV's This Morning, BBC's History Hunter and Radio 4's Today Programme.
Julian Baggini

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books including The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta), and most recently The Edge of Reason (Yale). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think-tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. His website is www.microphilosophy.net
Murray Bail

Born in Adelaide in 1941, Murray Bail now lives in Sydney. His fiction, which includes Eucalyptus, Holden's Performance, Homesickness and The Drover's Wife and Other Stories, has been translated into more than twenty-five languages, winning a number of major awards.
Bill Bailey

Bill Bailey is a comedian, musician, actor and presenter. He is perhaps most well known for his live shows - most recently Qualmpeddler, Limboland, and The Remarkable Guide to the Orchestra. His work on television includes programmes such as Never Mind the Buzzcocks, Black Books and QI. He was also the host of Bill Bailey's Birdwatching Bonanza in January 2010, and wrote and presented his award-winning documentary about Alfred Russel Wallace, Bill Bailey's Jungle Hero, in 2013. He lives in West London with a small menagerie of animals and humans.
Andrea Bajani

Andrea Bajani is an Italian writer and journalist, born in Rome in 1975. He has won the Premio Mondello and the Premio Bagutta for his fiction, the latter for Every Promise in 2011.
Joanne Baker

Joanne Baker studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge and took her PhD at the University of Sydney in 1995. She is a physical science editor at Science magazine, where her speciality is space and earth science.
Kurdo Baksi

Kurdo Baksi was born in 1965 in northern Kurdistan, and in 1980 came to settle in Sweden. In 1987 he first published the magazine Rash U Spi ('Black and White'), which deals with racial issues across Europe. He is the author of ten books on human rights, racism, emigration and exile, and in 2000 he was awarded the Olaf Palme Peace Prize. Laurie Thompson is the distinguished translator of the novels of Henning Mankell, Håkan Nesser and Åke Edwardson. He was editor of Swedish Book Review (1983-2002).
Elia Barceló

Elia Barceló was born in Alicante in 1957 and teaches Spanish Language and Literature at the University of Innsbruck. She made her name in science-fiction, but with books such as Heart of Tango she is fast gaining the wider readership that she so richly deserves. David Frye's translations include Thine Is the Kingdom (1999) and Distant Palaces (2004) by Cuban novelist Abilio Estévez, and The Curriculum Vitae of Aurora Ortiz (2005) by Spanish novelist Almudena Solana.
Simon Barnes

Simon Barnes writes on wildlife and sports for The Times and for various conservation bodies. He spends a lot of time in Africa, and led the great Pearson�s Cisticola Expedition to the Zambia-Zaire border. He lives in Suffolk with his wife, baby son, two horses and three cats. Alan Marks has illustrated many books for children including one on chimpanzees by Jane Goodall, and has also been involved with the World Wildlife Fund.
Alberto Barrera Tyszka

Alberto Barrera Tyszka, poet and novelist, is well known in Venezuela for his Sunday column in the newspaper El Nacional. He co-wrote the internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed Hugo Chávez (2007), the first biography of the Venezuelan president. His novel The Sickness won the prestigious Herralde Prize and was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Homeland or Death was the winner of the Tusquets Prize.
Pietro Bartolo

Pietro Bartolo was born in Lampedusa sixty years ago to a family of fishermen and grew up working on his father's boat. He returned to Lampedusa after getting his medical degree, and has been running the clinic since 1991.
Laura Barton

Laura Barton was born in Lancashire in 1977, and now lives in London. She has been a journalist at the Guardian since 2000, and has also written for Q, the Word, Intelligent Life and Radio 4.
Neal Bascomb

Neal Bascomb is the author of Higher (the story of the building of New York) and The Perfect Mile. His most recent book, Red Mutiny: The True Story of the Battleship Potemkin Mutiny, received outstanding reviews on its publication in 2007.
Jefferson Bass

Jefferson Bass is the writing team of Dr Bill Bass and Jon Jefferson. Dr Bass, a world-renowned forensic anthropologist, founded the Body Farm 25 years ago. Jefferson is a journalist, writer and documentary film-maker. His writings have appeared in the New York Times, Newsweek and USA Today.
Sacha Batthyány

Sacha Batthyány was born in Switzerland in 1973 to Hungarian émigré parents. He was an editor at the Neue Zürcher Zeitung and is now a political reporter for the Süddeutsche Zeitung, based in Washington DC.
Bernard Beckett

Bernard Beckett, born in 1967, is a high school teacher based in Wellington, New Zealand, where he teaches Drama, Mathematics and English. Genesis was written while he was on a Royal Society genetics research fellowship investigating DNA mutations. Genesis won the Young Adult Fiction category of the New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children and Young Adults 2007 and the 2007 Esther Glen award.
Antony Beevor

Antony Beevor is the author of CRETE: The Battle and the Resistance (Runciman Prize), STALINGRAD (Samuel Johnson Prize, Wolfson Prize for History and Hawthornden Prize), BERLIN: The Downfall, THE BATTLE FOR SPAIN (Premio La Vanguardia), D-DAY: The Battle for Normandy (Prix Henry Malherbe and the RUSI Westminster Medal), THE SECOND WORLD WAR, ARDENNES 1944 (Prix Médicis shortlist) and ARNHEM: The Battle for the Bridges. The number one bestselling historian in Britain, Beevor's books have appeared in thirty-two languages and have sold just over seven million copies. A former chairman of the Society of Authors, he has received a number of honorary doctorates. He is also a visiting professor at the University of Kent and an Honorary Fellow of King's College, London. He was knighted in 2017.
Anna Bell

Anna Bell currently writes the weekly column 'The Secret Dreamworld of An Aspiring Author' on the website Novelicious. She is a full-time writer and loves nothing more than going for walks with her husband and Labrador.