index
Our Authors
Jordan Stump

Jordan Stump has translated many authors from the French including Marie Redonnet, Eric Chevillard, and Honoré de Balzac. His translation of Jardin des Plantes by Claude Simon won the 2001 French-American Foundation translation prize, and he was named a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Artes et des Lettres in 2006.
Daniel Suarez

Daniel Suarez has designed software for the defence, finance and entertainment industries. He originally self-published DAEMON when rejected by mainstream publishers and agents. Blog raves, Amazon raves, and a feature in Wired magazine turned the book deservedly into a runaway hit. He lives in California, USA.
Suggs

Suggs is a singer, songwriter, DJ, actor and TV presenter. He is perhaps best known as lead singer with Madness, who have had 24 top-twenty hits and continue to tour. Suggs lives in Camden, London.
Mark Sullivan

Mark Sullivan is the New York Times bestselling author of several thrillers, and co-author with James Patterson of two other novels of suspense.
John Sutherland

John Sutherland is Emeritus Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College London and a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology. He has published 20 books, edited 30 more and written many articles on a variety of publications. His most recent books are The Boy Who Loved Books: A Memoir (2007) and How to Read a Novel: A User's Guide (2006). He also writes a weekly column for the Guardian, and is a former Chairman of the Booker Prize.
Italo Svevo

Italo Svevo was the pen name of Ettore Schmitz, who was born in Trieste in 1861. He wrote two books as a young man, but failed to achieve any literary renown. Confessions of Zeno came to the attention of literary circles in Paris through Svevo's connection with James Joyce and was soon recognized as a comic masterpiece.Beryl de Zoete (1879 - 1962) was a ballet dancer, dance critic, dance researcher as well as a translator. She traveled extensively in Bali and South Asia and co-wrote the classic Dance and Drama in Bali.Michael Hofmann is a German-born poet and translator.
Amanda Swift

Amanda Swift first worked as an actress, appearing in many commercials, including one for Angel Delight and another for Italian toilet-paper, Foxy. Theatre work included a show at Polka Children's Theatre and creating the role of the cleaning lady, Elvira Muckett, for Tony Hart's art show, Hartbeat. She has written for several children's series, including My Parents are Aliens, and has dramatised two Jacqueline Wilson books for Radio 4. She has written three novels for 9-12 year olds: The Boys' Club, Big Bones and Anna/Bella. She lives in London with her husband and her two hairy teenage sons. Jennifer Gray lives in central London and Scotland with her husband, 4 children and overfed cat, Henry (after Henry the Eighth). She has been writing children's comedy for a couple of years and her work has received an honorary mention in the SCBWI Undiscovered Voices Competition. Jennifer likes writing about everything from guinea pigs to fairy godmothers, cats with attitude and evil geniuses. She recently completed the Certificate in Novel Writing course at City University. Writing is Jennifer's passion (along with chocolate cake) and her ambition is to be nominated for the Roald Dahl Funny Prize one day.
Anne Swärd

Anne Swärd (1969) made her literary debut in 2003 with novel Polarsommar, which earned her an August Prize nomination. It was later followed by Kvicksand in 2006, which was nominated for Vi magazine's literature prize. Deborah Bragan-Turner is a bookseller and translator living in Beziers, France.
Dominique Sylvain

Dominique Sylvain worked as a journalist in Paris before relocating to Asia where she lived for spells in Japan and Singapore. She is the author of thirteen crime novels and now lives once more in Tokyo where she writes full-time.
Simon Sylvester

Simon Sylvester is a writer, teacher and occasional filmmaker. After working as a camera assistant and journalist, he began writing fiction and his short stories are published regularly in literary journals. Simon lives in Cumbria with his partner and their daughter Isadora.
Magda Szabó

Magda Szabó was born in Debrecen, eastern Hungary, in 1917, and began her working life as a teacher. From 1949 onwards her work was banned, but she burst onto the literary scene in 1958 with the publication of Fresco and The Dawn. Katalin Street was published in 1969 and Abigail in 1970. In 1987, publication of The Door brought her international recognition and was the winner of the Prix Femina and the Mondello Prize. She died in 2007. In 2016 The Door was chosen as Best Book of the Year by the New York Times.
George Szirtes

GEORGE SZIRTES' many books of poetry have won prizes including the T. S. Eliot Prize (2004), for which he was again shortlisted for Bad Machine (2013). His translation of Satantango by László Krasznahorkai (whom he interviewed for The White Review) was awarded the Best Translated Book Award in the US. He is also the translator of Sandor Marai and Magda Szabo. The Photographer at Sixteen is his first venture into prose writing of his own.
Georges Szirtes

GEORGE SZIRTES' many books of poetry have won prizes including the T. S. Eliot Prize (2004), for which he was again shortlisted for Bad Machine (2013). His translation of Satantango by László Krasznahorkai (whom he interviewed for The White Review) was awarded the Best Translated Book Award in the US. He is also the translator of Sandor Marai and Magda Szabo. The Photographer at Sixteen is his first venture into prose writing of his own.
Caterina Pascual Söderbaum

Caterina Pascual Söderbaum, 1962-2015, lived between Sweden and Spain and worked as a translator of Swedish literature into Spanish. Her first book, a collection of short stories entitled Sonetten om andningen (The Sonett on Breathing) (Lejd förlag, 2002), won Sweden's Catapult Prize for best first work of fiction. The Oblique Place was to be her last novel, and was awarded the prestigious Sveriges Radios Novel Prize posthumously.