Maylis de Kerangal - Mend the Living - Quercus

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  • Paperback £8.99
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    • ISBN:9780857053855
    • Publication date:23 Jun 2016
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    • ISBN:9780857053862
    • Publication date:11 Feb 2016

Mend the Living

By Maylis de Kerangal

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

From fatal accident to life-saving operation, Maylis de Kerangal, one of the brightest and boldest writers of modern literary fiction, returns with the epic story of a heart transplant.
Biographical Notes

Maylis de Kerangal spent her childhood in Le Havre, France. Her novel, Birth of a Bridge, was the winner of the Prix Franz Hessel and Prix Médicis in 2010. Her novella Tangente vers l'est was the winner of the 2012 Prix Landerneau. In 2014, her fifth novel, Réparer les vivants, was published to wide acclaim, winning the Grand Prix RTL-Lire award and the student choice novel of the year from France Culture and Télèrama.

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  • ISBN: 9780857053879
  • Publication date: 11 Feb 2016
  • Page count: 240
  • Imprint: MacLehose Press
This breathless novel has all the beauty of a Greek tragedy. It is also a hymn to creation and a meditation on the relationship between the body and consciousness, life and death. — Astrid de Larminat, Figaro
Far from being the simple tale of a heart transplant, this novel is a true epic, a great modern saga that investigates our relationship with death as much as our relationship with language. — François Busnel, Lire
A true novel, a great novel, an extraordinary novel. — Bernard Pivot, Journal du Dimanche
Maylis de Kerangal navigates perfectly between the epic and the intimate; let's just say that her writing will shake you to your very core. — Olivia de Lamberterie, Elle
Heartbreaking; I've seldom read a more moving book... De Kerangal is a master of momentum, to the extent that when the book ends, the reader feels bereft. She shows that narratives around illness and pain can energize the nobler angels of our nature and make for profoundly lovely art. One longs for more — Lydia Kiesling, Guardian
A thrilling opening sequence, well-suited to her urgent, breathless, visceral prose ... this extraordinary novel etches itself in the mind ... There is a flamboyant artistry at work, yet Maylis de Kerangal is confronting a reality that is all too real — Eileen Battersby, Irish Times
The story unfolds in an intricate lacework of precise detail. These characters feel less like fictional creations and more like ordinary people, briefly illuminated in rich language ... an exploration not only of death but of life, of humanity and fragility — Priya Parmar, New York Review of Books
Among the most fascinating writers of her generation. With Mend the Living, Maylis de Kerangal attains even greater heights — Raphaelle Leyris, Le Monde
A novel that goes to the heart of what it means to be a human being — Amanda Hopkinson, Independent
From its glorious 300-word first sentence to the stately canopic imagery of its climactic scenes, Mend the Living, beautifully translated from the French by Jessica Moore, mimics the rhythm of the processes it depicts - the troughs and peaks of grief and protocol, of skills utilised and acceptance finally achieved. — M. John Harrison, Guardian
MacLehose Press

Birth of a Bridge

Maylis de Kerangal, Maylis de Kerangal
Authors:
Maylis de Kerangal, Maylis de Kerangal

Adèle Geras

Adèle Geras is the author of many acclaimed stories for children as well as five adult novels, including: Facing the Light, Hester's Story, Made in Heaven and A Hidden Life (all available in ebook from Quercus), Cover Your Eyes (available in print from Quercus) and Out of the Dark, a special short story for the literary charity Quick Reads. Adèle lives near Cambridge and is the mother of the thriller writer Sophie Hannah.

Alix Ohlin

Alix Ohlin is the author of one previous novel, The Missing Person, and the story collection Babylon and Other Stories. She was born in Montreal and graduated from Harvard and the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin. Her stories have appeared in Best New American Voices, Best American Short Stories and other publications, and she has received fellowships from the Canada Council for the Arts, The MacDowell Colony and Yaddo.

Anna Bell

Anna Bell currently writes the weekly column 'The Secret Dreamworld of An Aspiring Author' on the website Novelicious. She is a full-time writer and loves nothing more than going for walks with her husband and Labrador.

Catherine Lowell

Catherine Lowell received her BA in Creative Writing from Stanford University and currently lives in New York City.The Madwoman Upstairs is her first novel.

Christie Watson

Christie Watson trained as a paediatric nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital, and worked as a nurse, educator and senior sister for over ten years before joining UEA for her MA in Creative Writing, where she won the Malcolm Bradbury Bursary. Christie lives in South London with her Nigerian Muslim partner and their large dual heritage, multi-faith family. Christie is a winner of Red's Hot Women Awards 2012.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Dave Heyhoe

Dave and Treo have won numerous awards, including the Dickin Medal - more commonly known as 'the animal Victoria Cross' - and the Cruft's Friends for Life Award. Both Dave and Treo are now retired from the army and they share a home in rural Cheshire.

Derek Robinson

Derek Robinson, the son of a policeman, read history at Cambridge before working in advertising in London and New York. His novel Goshawk Squadron was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1971.

Ed O'Loughlin

Ed O'Loughlin was born in Toronto and raised in Ireland. He reported from Africa for the Irish Times, and was Middle East correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and the Age of Melbourne. His first novel, Not Untrue & Not Unkind was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2009. His second novel, Toploader, was published by Quercus in 2011.

Elaine Proctor

Elaine Proctor was born in South Africa. She became involved in the anti-apartheid movement as a teenager and filmed several political documentaries up until 1986, when the political situation made it impossible for her to continue and she left to study at the National Film and Television School in Britain. She has made several films, including On The Wire (winner of the British Film Institute's Sutherland Trophy) and Friends (selected by the Cannes Film Festival and winner of the Mention Speciale - Prix de Camera D'Or), has written a series for the BBC and published two novels, Rhumba and The Savage Hour. She sits on the chapter for screenwriting at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts and is a member of the Writer's Guild of Great Britain. Elaine lives in Queen's Park, London.

Eleanor Prescott

Eleanor Prescott has worked in PR for ten years. She lives in Kent with her husband, son and daughter. Alice Brown's Lessons in the Curious Art of Dating is her first novel.

Elizabeth Brundage

Elizabeth Brundage graduated from Hampshire College, attended the NYU film school, was a screenwriting fellow at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, and received an M.F.A. as well as a James Michener Award from the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop. She has taught at a variety of colleges and universities, most recently at Skidmore College as a visiting writer in residence. She lives near Albany in upstate New York.

Elizabeth Gill

Elizabeth Gill was born in Newcastle upon Tyne and as a child lived in Tow Law, a small mining town on the Durham fells. She has been a published author for more than thirty years and has written more than forty books. She lives in Durham City, likes the awful weather in the north east and writes best when rain is lashing the windows.

Elizabeth Hay

Elizabeth Hay is the bestselling, award-winning author of Late Nights on Air, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her other works include A Student of Weather (finalist for the Giller Prize and the Ottawa Book Award), Garbo Laughs (winner of the Ottawa Book Award and a finalist for the Governor General's Award), and Small Change (stories). In 2002, she received the prestigious Marian Engel Award. Elizabeth Hay lives and writes in Ottawa.

Elizabeth Heathcote

Elizabeth Heathcote has worked as a feature writer and editor on newspapers and magazines for many years. Her jobs have included women's editor and deputy features editor at the Independent on Sunday, as well as freelance feature writing for publications such as the Independent, Observer, Guardian, Marie Claire and Red. She is presently associate editor at Psychologies magazine. Elizabeth's home is southeast London, where she lives with her partner and two children.

Eva Rice

Eva Rice has written three novels and one non-fiction book. She is married to a musician and has three children. She lives in London.

Hannah Michell

Hannah Michell was born in Yorkshire in 1983 and grew up in Seoul, South Korea. She studied Philosophy and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge, then received an MA in Creative Writing from City University. She has worked for the Economist, Penguin Books and now lectures on Korean pop culture at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first novel, The Defections, was published in 2014.

Hideo Yokoyama

Hideo Yokoyama (Author)Born in 1957, Hideo Yokoyama worked for twelve years as an investigative reporter with a regional newspaper north of Tokyo, before becoming one of Japan's most acclaimed fiction writers. His exhaustive and relentless work ethic is known to mirror the intense and obsessive behaviour of his characters; and in January 2003 he was hospitalized following a heart attack brought about by working constantly for seventy-two hours. Six Four is his sixth novel, and his first to be published in the English language.Jonathan Lloyd-Davies (Translator)Jonathan Lloyd-Davies studied Japanese at Durham and Chinese at Oxford; he currently works as a translator of Japanese fiction. His translations include Edge by Koji Suzuki, with co-translator Camellia Nieh, the Demon Hunters trilogy by Baku Yumemakura, Gray Men by Tomotake Ishikawa, and Nan-Core by Mahokaru Numata. His translation of Edge received the Shirley Jackson award for best novel. Originally from Wales, he now resides in Tokyo.

Hilary Boyd

Hilary Boyd trained as a nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital, then as a marriage guidance counselor. After a degree in English Literature at London University in her thirties, she moved into health journalism, writing a Mind, Body, Spirit column for the Daily Express. She published six non-fiction books on health-related subjects before turning to fiction and writing a string of bestsellers, starting with Thursdays in the Park. Hilary is married to film director/producer Don Boyd.