Elizabeth Gill - Under a Cloud-Soft Sky - Quercus

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Under a Cloud-Soft Sky

Can she bear to leave the place she calls home?

By Elizabeth Gill

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An emotional saga about the meaning of home from a bestselling author. Perfect for fans of Dilly Court, Maggie Hope and Nadine Dorries.

An emotional saga about the meaning of home from a bestselling author. Perfect for fans of Dilly Court, Maggie Hope and Nadine Dorries.

1890, County Durham. Dennes Eliot has worked hard to create a better life for himself. Now a respectable worker at the local Foundry and boarding with his friend Nat, he tries his best to forget his shameful beginnings. But can he really fulfil his dreams in a place where everyone knows his past? Grace Hemingway knows all about the Foundry her father runs, and loves the community built around it. But her parents are grooming her for a stunning London marriage to a man she's not yet met. Can she bear to leave the place she calls home?

Biographical Notes

Elizabeth Gill is the author of absorbing sagas including The Singing Winds, Far from My Father's House and The Road to Berry Edge. She lives in Durham.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781782061755
  • Publication date: 31 Jan 2013
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Quercus
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