Andreï Makine - A Woman Loved - Quercus

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  • Hardback £16.99
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    • ISBN:9780857059925
    • Publication date:06 Aug 2015
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    • ISBN:9781848668850
    • Publication date:06 Aug 2015

A Woman Loved

By Andreï Makine

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

A Russian filmmaker finds love where he leasts expects it

Catherine the Great's life seems to have been made for the cinema. Countless love affairs and wild sexual escapades, betrayal, revenge, murder - there is no shortage of historical drama. But Oleg Erdmann, a young Russian filmmaker, seeks to discover and portray the real Catherine, her essential, emotional truth.

When he is dropped from the film he initially scripted - his name summarily excised from the credits - Erdmann is cast adrift in a changing world. A second chance beckons when an old friend enriched by the capitalist new dawn invites him to refashion his opus for a television serial. But Erdmann is made acutely aware that the market exerts its own forms of censorship.

While he comes to accept that each age must cast Catherine in its own image, one question continues to nag at him. Was the empress, whose sexual appetites were sated with favours bought with titles and coin, ever truly loved? In his search for an answer, Erdmann will find a love of his own that brings the fulfilment that filmmaking once promised him.

Biographical Notes

Andreï Makine was born in Siberia, but writes his novels in French. Le Testament Français was the winner of the Prix Goncourt and the Prix Medici, and the first novel to win both of these prestigious awards.

Geoffrey Strachan has translated all Andreï Makine's novels published in English. He was awarded the Scott-Moncrieff Prize for Makine's Le Testament Français.

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  • ISBN: 9781848668867
  • Publication date: 04 Aug 2016
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: MacLehose Press
Andreï Makine is among the most skilled and subtle authors working today, and this novel is one of his masterpieces. — Sarah Crown, Times Literary Supplement.
The visionary Makine has written yet another remarkable novel. A Woman Loved is about art, film-making, an artist's search for expression and a woman's desperate if despotic search for love. It is also about how ideas give life meaning. Above all, it is about Russia, past and present. — Eileen Battersby, Irish Times.
We are fortunate, in our own grey time, to have a novelist like Makine, and he has been fortunate in the translator who has brought all his books to the English-reading world. Geoffrey Strachan renders him perfectly into English. I have read Makine in both French and English, and Strachan contrives to make the English reading experience no different from reading the original French. This is remarkable. — Allan Massie, Scotsman.
With all the imaginative virtuosity he is known for, Andrei Makine has managed to construct a Russian doll-like novel, where the centuries overlap and replicate each other — Thierry Clermont, Figaro
By untangling the skein of two realities, two centuries apart, [Makine] has braided together art and life, fiction and reality — Macha Séry, Le Monde
Andrei Makine takes on the centuries with a mastery worthy of the most scholarly historian . . . A magnetic novel — Marianne Payot, L'Express
This novel about a film-maker writing, and trying to make, a film about Catherine the Great, first under the supervision of Soviet censors and then in the mad days of the Yeltsin presidency when the oligarchs ran wild and became precariously rich, is one of his best. And that's very high praise. — Spectator Books of the Year
MacLehose Press

Avenging Angels

Lyuba Vinogradova
Authors:
Lyuba Vinogradova

The girls came from every corner of the U.S.S.R. They were factory workers, domestic servants, teachers and clerks, and few were older than twenty. Though many had led hard lives before the war, nothing could have prepared them for the brutal facts of their new existence: with their country on its knees, and millions of its men already dead, grievously wounded or in captivity, from 1942 onwards thousands of Soviet women were trained as snipers.Thrown into the midst of some of the fiercest fighting of the Second World War they would soon learn what it was like to spend hour upon hour hunting German soldiers in the bleak expanses of no-man's-land; they would become familiar with the awful power that comes with taking another person's life; and in turn they would discover how it feels to see your closest friends torn away from you by an enemy shell or bullet.In a narrative that travels from the sinister catacombs beneath the Kerch Peninsula to Byelorussia's primeval forests and, finally, to the smoking ruins of the Third Reich, Lyuba Vinogradova recounts the untold stories of these brave young women. Drawing on diaries, letters and interviews with survivors, as well as previously unpublished material from the military archives, she offers a moving and unforgettable record of their experiences: the rigorous training, the squalid living quarters, the blood and chaos of the Eastern Front, and those moments of laughter and happiness that occasionally allowed the girls to forget, for a second or two, their horrifying circumstances. Avenging Angels is a masterful account of an all-too-often overlooked chapter of history, and an unparalleled account of these women's lives.Translated from the Russian by Arch Tait

MacLehose Press

The House with the Stained-Glass Window

Zanna Sloniowska
Authors:
Zanna Sloniowska

"The House with the Stained-Glass Window is remarkable, a gripping, Lvivian evocation of a city and a family across a long and painful century, at once personal and political, a novel of life and survival across the ages" PHILIPPE SANDS, author of East West StreetIn 1989, Marianna, the beautiful star soprano at the Lviv opera, is shot dead in the street as she leads the Ukrainian citizens in their protest against Soviet power. Only eleven years old at the time, her daughter tells the story of their family before and after that critical moment - including, ten years later, her own passionate affair with an older, married man. Just like their home city of Lviv, which stands at the crossroads of nations and cultures, the women in this family have had turbulent lives, scarred by war and political turmoil, but also by their own inability to show each other their feelings. Lyrically told, this is the story of a young girl's emotional, sexual, artistic and political awakening as she matures under the influence of her relatives, her mother's former lover, her city and its fortunes.Translated from the Polish by Antonia Lloyd-Jones

MacLehose Press

The Longest Night

Otto de Kat
Authors:
Otto de Kat
Quercus

A Crime in the Family

Sacha Batthyány
Authors:
Sacha Batthyány

A memoir of brutality, heroism and personal discovery from Europe's dark heart, revealing one of the most extraordinary untold stories of the Second World WarIn the spring of 1945, at Rechnitz on the Austrian-Hungarian border, not far from the front lines of the advancing Red Army, Countess Margit Batthyany gave a party in her mansion. The war was almost over, and the German aristocrats and SS officers dancing and drinking knew it was lost. Late that night, they walked down to the village, where 180 enslaved Jewish labourers waited, made them strip naked, and shot them all, before returning to the bright lights of the party. It remained a secret for decades, until Sacha Batthyany, who remembered his great-aunt Margit only vaguely from his childhood as a stern, distant woman, began to ask questions about it.A Crime in the Family is Sacha Batthyany's memoir of confronting these questions, and of the answers he found. It is one of the last untold stories of Europe's nightmare century, spanning not just the massacre at Rechnitz, the inhumanity of Auschwitz, the chaos of wartime Budapest and the brutalities of Soviet occupation and Stalin's gulags, but also the silent crimes of complicity and cover-up, and the damaged generations they leave behind. Told partly through the surviving journals of others from the author's family and the vanished world of Rechnitz, A Crime in the Family is a moving and revelatory memoir in the vein of The Hare with the Amber Eyes and The House by the Lake. It uncovers barbarity and tragedy but also a measure of peace and reconciliation. Ultimately, Batthyany discovers that although his inheritance might be that of monsters, he does not bear it alone.

MacLehose Press

Kingdom of Twilight

Steven Uhly
Authors:
Steven Uhly

HISTORICAL FICTION BOOK OF THE MONTH - THE TIMESOne night in autumn 1944, a gunshot echoes through the alleyways of a small town in occupied Poland. An S.S. officer is shot dead by a young Polish Jew, Margarita Ejzenstain. In retaliation, his commander orders the execution of thirty-seven Poles - one for every year of the dead man's life. First hidden by a German couple, Margarita must then flee the brutal advance of the Soviet army with her new-born baby. So begins a thrilling panorama of intermingled destinies and events that reverberate from that single act of defiance. KINGDOM OF TWILIGHT follows the lives of Jewish refugees and a German family resettled from Bukovina, as well as a former S.S. officer, chronicling the geographical and psychological dislocation generated by war. A quest for identity and truth takes them from Displaced Persons camps to Lübeck, Berlin, Tel Aviv and New York, as they try to make sense of a changed world, and of their place in it. Hypnotically lyrical and intensely moving, Steven Uhly's epic novel is a finely nuanced and yet shattering exploration of universal themes: love, hatred, doubt, survival, guilt, humanity and redemption.For readers of HHHH by Laurent Binet, THE KINDLY ONES by Jonathan Littell, THE ZONE OF INTEREST by Martin Amis, and ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE by Anthony DoerrTranslated from the German by Jamie Bulloch

MacLehose Press

Between the Wars

Philip Ziegler
Authors:
Philip Ziegler
MacLehose Press

Raoul Wallenberg

Ingrid Carlberg
Authors:
Ingrid Carlberg
MacLehose Press

Brief Loves That Live Forever

Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
Authors:
Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine

Dorothy Koomson

Dorothy Koomson is the author of seven novels - The Cupid Effect, The Chocolate Run, My Best Friend's Girl, Marshmallows for Breakfast, Goodnight, Beautiful, The Ice Cream Girls and The Woman He Loved Before, all of them Sunday Times bestsellers. Dorothy is currently working on another book and a screenplay. She lives in Brighton.

Eleanor Prescott

Eleanor Prescott has worked in PR for ten years. She lives in Kent with her husband, son and daughter. Alice Brown's Lessons in the Curious Art of Dating is her first novel.

Elizabeth Hay

Elizabeth Hay is the bestselling, award-winning author of Late Nights on Air, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her other works include A Student of Weather (finalist for the Giller Prize and the Ottawa Book Award), Garbo Laughs (winner of the Ottawa Book Award and a finalist for the Governor General's Award), and Small Change (stories). In 2002, she received the prestigious Marian Engel Award. Elizabeth Hay lives and writes in Ottawa.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Eva Rice

Eva Rice has written three novels and one non-fiction book. She is married to a musician and has three children. She lives in London.

Julian Evans

JULIAN EVANS wrote and presented the BBC Radio 3 series on the European novel, The Romantic Road, and has won the Prix du Rayonnement de la Langue Française. His most recent book is Semi-Invisible Man: the life of Norman Lewis.

Kathryn Flett

Kathryn Flett is a journalist who has written for numerous international publications and makes regular TV and radio appearances as a critic and pundit. She was the TV critic for the Observer for ten years and currently writes a restaurant review column, Table for Two, for the Sunday Telegraph. Outstanding is her second novel. She lives (with her two sons, Jackson and Rider, her partner, the photographer Julian Anderson, two cats and a whippet called Slim), in St-Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex.

Maggie Ross

Maggie Ross was born in Essex, but has lived most of her life in London. She studied Art and qualified as a teacher before embarking on a career as a writer. She has written two novels: The Gasteropod (1969), which won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and Milena (1983), as well as poetry, short stories, radio dramas and television screenplays.

Michael Holroyd

Michael Holroyd was born in 1935, and educated at Eton and the Maidenhead Public Library. His biographies of Hugh Kingsmill, Lytton Strachey, Augustus John and Bernard Shaw have established him as one of the most influential biographers of modern times. He was awarded the CBE in 1989 and was knighted in 2007. He is married to novelist Margaret Drabble and lives in London and Somerset.

Norbert Gstrein

Norbert Gstrein was born in 1961 in the Austrian Tyrol, and studied mathematics at Innsbruck and Stanford, California. He is the author of The English Years, which won widespread critical acclaim in Germany and was awarded the coveted Alfred Döblin Prize.

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano was born in Paris, France in 1945. He was the recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. He previously won the 2012 Austrian State Prize for European Literature, the 2010 Prix mondial Cino Del Duca from the Institut de France for lifetime achievement, the 1978 Prix Goncourt for Rue des boutiques obscures, and the 1972 Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française for Les Boulevards de ceinture.

Per Olov Enquist

Per Olov Enquist was born in 1934 in a small village in Norrland, the northern part of Sweden. He is one of Sweden's leading contemporary writers, both as a novelist and a playwright. He has twice won the August Prize for fiction, the most prestigious Swedish literary prize, and was awarded the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for The Visit of the Royal Physician.