Related to: 'Yangsze Choo'

Quercus

A Beginner’s Guide to the End

Shoshana Berger, BJ Miller
Authors:
Shoshana Berger, BJ Miller
Quercus

The Price of Paradise

Iain Overton
Authors:
Iain Overton
riverrun

Prefecture D

Hideo Yokoyama
Authors:
Hideo Yokoyama

A collection of four novellas: each taking place in 1998, each set in the world of Six Four, and each centring around a mystery and the unfortunate officer tasked with solving it.SEASON OF SHADOWS"The force could lose face . . . I want you to fix this." Personnel's Futawatari receives a horrifying memo forcing him to investigate the behaviour of a legendary detective with unfinished business.CRY OF THE EARTH"It's too easy to kill a man with a rumour." Shinto of Internal Affairs receives an anonymous tipoff alleging a Station Chief is visiting the red-light district ­- a warning he soon learns is a red herring.BLACK LINES"It was supposed to be her special day." Section Chief Nanao, responsible for the force's 49 female officers, is alarmed to learn her star pupil has not reported for duty, and is believed to be missing.BRIEFCASE"We need to know what he's going to ask." On the eve of a routine debate, Political Liaison Tsuge learns a wronged politician is preparing his revenge. He must now quickly dig up dirt to silence him.Prefecture D continues Hideo Yokoyama's exploration of the themes of obsession, saving face, office politics and inter-departmental conflicts. Placing everyday characters between a rock and a hard place and then dialling up the pressure, he blends and balances the very Japanese with the very accessible, to spectacular effect.

Quercus

The Night Tiger

Yangsze Choo
Authors:
Yangsze Choo

'A sumptuous garden maze of a novel' Kirkus ReviewsThey say a tiger that devours too many humans can take the form of a man and walk among us... In 1930s colonial Malaya, a dissolute British doctor receives a surprise gift of an eleven-year-old Chinese houseboy. Sent as a bequest from an old friend, young Ren has a mission: to find his dead master's severed finger and reunite it with his body. Ren has forty-nine days, or else his master's soul will roam the earth forever. Ji Lin, an apprentice dressmaker, moonlights as a dancehall girl to pay her mother's debts. One night, Ji Lin's dance partner leaves her with a gruesome souvenir that leads her on a crooked, dark trail. As time runs out for Ren's mission, a series of unexplained deaths occur amid rumours of tigers who turn into men. In their journey to keep a promise and discover the truth, Ren and Ji Lin's paths will cross in ways they will never forget.Captivating and lushly written, The Night Tiger explores the rich world of servants and masters, ancient superstition and modern ambition, sibling rivalry and unexpected love. Woven through with Chinese folklore and a tantalizing mystery, this novel is a page-turner of the highest order.

riverrun

I'll Keep You Safe

Peter May
Authors:
Peter May

THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER FROM THE MILLION-SELLING AUTHOR OF CAST IRON, COFFIN ROAD AND THE BLACKHOUSEWHATEVER HAPPENSNiamh and Ruairidh Macfarlane co-own the Hebridean company Ranish Tweed. On a business trip to Paris to promote their luxury brand, Niamh learns of Ruairidh's affair, and then looks on as he and his lover are killed by a car bomb. She returns home to Lewis, bereft.I'LL ALWAYS BE THERE FOR YOUNiamh begins to look back on her life with Ruairidh, desperate to identify anyone who may have held a grudge against him. The French police, meanwhile, have ruled out terrorism, and ruled in murder - and sent Detective Sylvie Braque to shadow their prime suspect: Niamh.I'LL KEEP YOU SAFE, NO MATTER WHATAs one woman works back through her memories, and the other moves forward with her investigation, the two draw ever closer to a deadly enemy with their own, murderous, designs.'Peter May is a writer I would follow to the ends of the earth' New York Times

riverrun

City of Devils

Paul French
Authors:
Paul French

'Shanghai's champion storyteller - He grips his reader to the end' Economist'Gripping, breakneck ultra-noir reminiscent of vintage Ellroy' David Peace, author of Red or Dead'If you love Richard Lloyd Parry and David Grann, don't miss City of Devils' Megan Abbott, author of Dare Me1930s Shanghai could give Chicago a run for its money. In the years before the Japanese invaded, the city was a haven for outlaws from all over the world: a place where pasts could be forgotten, fascism and communism outrun, names invented, fortunes made - and lost. 'Lucky' Jack Riley was the most notorious of those outlaws. An ex-Navy boxing champion, he escaped from prison in the States, spotted a craze for gambling and rose to become the Slot King of Shanghai. Ruler of the clubs in that day was 'Dapper' Joe Farren - a Jewish boy who fled Vienna's ghetto with a dream of dance halls. His chorus lines rivalled Ziegfeld's and his name was in lights above the city's biggest casino.In 1940 they bestrode the Shanghai Badlands like kings, while all around the Solitary Island was poverty, starvation and genocide. They thought they ruled Shanghai; but the city had other ideas. This is the story of their rise to power, their downfall, and the trail of destruction they left in their wake. Shanghai was their playground for a flickering few years, a city where for a fleeting moment even the wildest dreams seemed possible.In the vein of true crime books whose real brilliance is the recreation of a time and place, this is an impeccably researched narrative non-fiction told with superb energy and brio, as if James Ellroy had stumbled into a Shanghai cathouse.

riverrun

The Ghost Marriage

Peter May
Authors:
Peter May
Jo Fletcher Books

Spirits From Beyond

Simon R. Green
Authors:
Simon R. Green

The Carnacki Institute is all about ghosts - or at least, keeping them under control.Their latest assignment sees JC and the team sent to a small country village, site of a famously haunted inn. At first, JC thinks that the spirits in the King's Arms are more the stuff of urban legend than anything that needs the Ghost Finders' expertise. But one story rings true: the tale of a traveller trapped in the inn by an unusual thunderstorm. She retired to her room for the night - and vanished.Trapped by an unusual thunderstorm - like the one that begins raging outside shortly after they arrive . . . As the team investigates, they are forced, one by one, to face some hard truths about themselves, their relationships and the haunting itself - truths that may push Happy Jack over the edge into the madness he has always feared . . .Spirits from Beyond is the fourth title in New York Times bestselling author Simon R. Green's Ghost Finders series.

riverrun

A Place of Refuge

Tobias Jones
Authors:
Tobias Jones
Jo Fletcher Books

Swords of Good Men

Snorri Kristjansson
Authors:
Snorri Kristjansson

Ulfar and his highborn cousin Geiri have one last stop on their long journey - but the Viking town of Stenvik is filled with dangerous men: a 'brutal, bloody book' (MARK LAWRENCE on Goodreads), a riveting adventure of clashing Viking powers.Ulfar Thormodsson was tasked with taking his highborn cousin Geiri on a tour of the kingdom, punishment for after disgracing his father. After two bitterly uncomfortable years on the road, he just wants to go home.'Highly recommended' (The Eloquent Page) 'powerful epic fantasy series crammed full with Vikings' 'Historical Novel SocietyBut the last stop, the walled town of Stenvik, is different: it contains the mysterious blacksmith Audun, who just wants to be left alone, and the beautiful Lilja, who immediately captures Ulfar's heart - but Stenvik is also home to some very deadly men, including Lilja's brutal husband, who could break Ulfar in an instant.And Stenvik is about to become the battleground in deadly war between the old gods and the new: King Olav is bringing the White Christ to the masses at point of sword and edge of blade - while a Viking horde led by a mysterious woman is sailing from the north.Ulfar and Audun are about to learn that their enemies are not all outside the walls - and blood will wash the land . . .

Quercus highlights for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Big books for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick u

February Round-Up

Our Favourite Reads This Winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

BJ Miller

Dr. BJ Miller, Jr. is a hospice and palliative care specialist. He is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at UCSF where he attends on the Symptom Management Service at UCSF's Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center, one of the first community-based palliative care programs in the country. He is also a long-time director of the Zen Hospice Project, a pioneering hospice organization in San Francisco. BJ is a native of Chicago. He studied art history as an undergraduate at Princeton University. He worked for several years for art and disability-rights nonprofit organizations before earning a medical degree at UCSF. He completed an internal medicine residency at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, where he was chief resident, and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Harvard Medical School, working at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In his work, he connects humanism and medicine in end-of-life and upstream palliative care.

Peter May

Peter May was born and raised in Scotland. He was an award-winning journalist at the age of twenty-one and a published novelist at twenty-six. When his first book was adapted as a major drama series for the BCC, he quit journalism and during the high-octane fifteen years that followed, became one of Scotland's most successful television dramatists. He created three prime-time drama series, presided over two of the highest-rated serials in his homeland as script editor and producer, and worked on more than 1,000 episodes of ratings-topping drama before deciding to leave television to return to his first love, writing novels.He has won several literature awards in France, received the USA's Barry Award for The Blackhouse, the first in his internationally bestselling Lewis Trilogy; and in 2014 was awarded the ITV Specsavers Crime Thriller Book Club Best Read of the Year award for Entry Island. Peter now lives in South-West France with his wife, writer Janice Hally.

Hideo Yokoyama

Hideo Yokoyama (Author)Born in 1957, Hideo Yokoyama worked for twelve years as an investigative reporter with a regional newspaper north of Tokyo, before becoming one of Japan's most acclaimed fiction writers. His exhaustive and relentless work ethic is known to mirror the intense and obsessive behaviour of his characters; and in January 2003 he was hospitalized following a heart attack brought about by working constantly for seventy-two hours. Six Four is his sixth novel, and his first to be published in the English language.Jonathan Lloyd-Davies (Translator)Jonathan Lloyd-Davies studied Japanese at Durham and Chinese at Oxford; he currently works as a translator of Japanese fiction. His translations include Edge by Koji Suzuki, with co-translator Camellia Nieh, the Demon Hunters trilogy by Baku Yumemakura, Gray Men by Tomotake Ishikawa, and Nan-Core by Mahokaru Numata. His translation of Edge received the Shirley Jackson award for best novel. Originally from Wales, he now resides in Tokyo.