Related to: 'Tom Callaghan'

Quercus

An Autumn Hunting

Tom Callaghan
Authors:
Tom Callaghan
Quercus

A Spring Betrayal

Tom Callaghan
Authors:
Tom Callaghan
Quercus

A Summer Revenge

Tom Callaghan
Authors:
Tom Callaghan
Heron Books

The Harrowing

James Aitcheson
Authors:
James Aitcheson
Quercus

A Killing Winter

Tom Callaghan
Authors:
Tom Callaghan
Quercus

Sailing Close to the Wind

Dennis Skinner, Kevin Maguire
Authors:
Dennis Skinner, Kevin Maguire

Dennis Skinner, the famed Beast of Bolsover, is adored by legions of supporters and respected as well as feared by admiring enemies. Fiery and forthright, with a prodigious recall, Skinner is one of the best-known politicians in Britain. He remains as passionate and committed to the causes he champions as on the first day he entered the House of Commons back in 1970. In an age of growing cynicism about politicians, the witty and astute Skinner is renowned as a brightly burning beacon of principle. He has watched Prime Ministers come and go - Heath, Wilson, Callaghan, Thatcher, Major, Blair, Brown - and yet remains uncorrupted by patronage and compromise. Cameron discovered Skinner's popularity when a public backlash forced the current PM to apologise in Parliament for calling Skinner a dinosaur who should be in a museum. Skinner at eighty has a unique take on post-war Britain. A combatant in the great social, industrial and political upheavals of the last half century, he's resisted telling his extraordinary story. Until now.

Heron Books

The Walls of Byzantium

James Heneage
Authors:
James Heneage
Quercus

The Sweetness of Forgetting

Kristin Harmel
Authors:
Kristin Harmel

Savour The Sweetness of Forgetting: a tale of baking, love, hope and faith across generations. The North Star Bakery has been in Hope's family for generations, the secret recipes passed down from mother to daughter. But at thirty-six and recently divorced, with rebellious daughter Annie and elderly grandmother Rose to care for, Hope is less than enthusiastic about carrying on the family legacy. When the bakery runs into financial trouble and Rose takes a turn for the worse, Hope's delicate balancing act is in danger of crumbling entirely. Then Rose reveals a shocking truth about her past and everything Hope thought she knew about her family and the bakery is turned upside down. At her grandmother's request, Hope travels to Paris, armed only with a mysterious list of names. What she uncovers there could be the key to saving the bakery and the fulfilment of a star-crossed romance, seventy years in the making. Now with added book club discussion topics and inspirational food ideas created by the author.

riverrun

Lord of Misrule

Jaimy Gordon
Authors:
Jaimy Gordon

Quercus

English as a Second Language

Megan Crane
Authors:
Megan Crane

Alexandra Brennan is doing just fine in a dead end job working for people she hates in New York, until she bumps into an ex in a bar, and he tells her she'll never make it to graduate school in the UK. Never one to let a challenge pass her by, Alex applies and when she gets a place at the University of York, she finds herself on a plane to the other side of the Atlantic, wondering what on earth she's done.Armed with American cigarettes and extra-strength coffee, Alex is ready to face everything Britain has to offer - beer, blokes and more books than she can possibly read in a year. Falling for her lecturer, the divine Sean Douglas, and managing to get a Master's somewhere along the line, Alex realises that instead of running away from home, she might just have found it

Crime Files discovers what Tom Callaghan would do as the master of Cluedo and who he'd have at his dream dinner party. . .

Q&A with Tom Callaghan

If you were stranded on a desert island and could take one crime novel, one DVD boxset and one character from a crime novel, who/what would you take? ‘The Big Sleep’, ‘The Wire’, Charlie Parker from the John Connolly books. Who would you invite to your dream dinner party and what would be on the menu? Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, James Lee Burke, Stephen King, Basil Bunting, Captain Beefheart, Miles Davis. We’d eat Cantonese, steak, vegetarian, Classic Italian, rural French, and lots to drink. But the real answer is a mix of Thai and Vietnamese dishes with my wife Sara and my son Akyl. Are you a hero or a villain? I’d probably be the observer who avoids getting involved, a minor character whose name appears halfway down the credits. What is your favourite line from a film/TV series/book?· What crime novel do you wish you had written? Film: “I have seen things you people wouldn’t believe… Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time… to die…” TV series: Bladerunner Book: I would love to have written ‘The Big Sleep’. If your book was being made into a film, who would you want to play the lead character? Ideally, a Kyrgyz actor should play the part of Akyl Borubaev, which would be the opportunity of a lifetime. But if the film were set somewhere else, then you’d want a tough guy who’s also compassionate. Daniel Craig? Where are Bogart and Mitchum when you need them? What’s the scariest place you’ve visited? Peru, in the middle of a civil war. OR Rochdale town centre, on a Saturday night. You are master of cluedo and have any name, weapon and room at your disposal, whodunit and what happened? As I’m the master, I’m taking the game out of Tudor Hall, and placing it in the Kulturny bar in Bishkek. All the rooms have dead gangsters in them, shot, stabbed or poisoned. Whodunit? It’s up to Murder Squad Inspector Akyl Borubaev to find out…

Quercus highlights for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Big books for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick u

February Round-Up

Our Favourite Reads This Winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

About Us

Quercus Publishing Plc is an award winning publisher acquired by Hodder and Stoughton, a major UK-based publishing group and wholly owned subsidiary of the Hachette UK group. We publish a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and are enthused to extend the passion we have for our wide range of books to the reader. Founded in 2004 by CEO Mark Smith and Wayne Davies, Quercus produced its very first titles – Universe and Speeches that Changed the World, which went on to be bestsellers across the UK and US. Another title, The Digital Photography Handbook remains the best-selling photography book to this day. Alongside Stef Penny’s The Tenderness of Wolves, which won the Costa Book of the Year Award, Quercus’s first imprint, The MacLehose Press achieved worldwide success with the release of Stieg Larsson’s award winning Millenium Trilogy, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The sequel, The Girl Who Played With Fire, became a number one bestseller and made publishing history. The non-fiction list exploded with the release of Mark Logue and Peter Conradi’s The Kings Speech, the true story behind the award-winning film and a Sunday Times bestseller. In fiction, Peter May’s The Black House was the first title to be picked for the Richard and Judy book club and achieved spectacular sales success. Peter has since gone on to write Lewis man, Entry Island, The Critic and Runaway amongst others. We continue to publish outstanding talent, such as fiction writers Anna Smith, Elly Griffiths and Jessica Cornwell, as well as a non-fiction list covering areas such as cookery, children’s novels, sci-fi and world literature. Our crime and thriller lists boast exceptional novels from some of the best writers, like Tom Callaghan and Elena Forbes. It’s about delivering the best to Quercus, to our authors, to you.

Dennis Skinner

Dennis Skinner is the son of a miner sacked after the 1926 General Strike. Skinner, to the distress of his mother, and despite a Grammar School education, followed his dad down the pit. He was a Clay Cross and Derbyshire councillor before winning Bolsover for Labour in 1970, a seat he's held ever since. A former chairman of Labour, current member of the party's ruling National Executive Committee, Skinner's Parliamentary heckles and interventions are legendary. He was expelled so often from the Commons that suspension became an occupational hazard.