Related to: 'A Field Guide to Reality'

MacLehose Press

Homeland or Death

Alberto Barrera Tyszka
Authors:
Alberto Barrera Tyszka

riverrun

The Runner

Peter May
Authors:
Peter May
Quercus

Myths in Minutes

Neil Philip
Authors:
Neil Philip
Quercus

Prussian Blue

Philip Kerr
Authors:
Philip Kerr

The twelfth book in the Sunday Times and New York Times bestselling series, perfect for fans of John le Carre. Lee Child calls Bernie Gunther 'one of the greatest anti-heroes ever written'.France, 1956. Bernie Gunther is on the run. If there's one thing he's learned, it's never to refuse a job from a high-ranking secret policeman. But this is exactly what he's just done. Now he's a marked man, with the East German Stasi on his tail.Fleeing across Europe, he remembers the last time he worked with his pursuer: in 1939, to solve a murder at the Berghof, Hitler's summer hideaway in the Bavarian Alps. Hitler is long dead, the Berghof now a ruined shell, and the bizarre time Bernie spent there should be no more than a distant memory.But as he pushes on to Berlin and safety, Bernie will find that no matter how far he thinks he has put Nazi Germany behind him, for him it will always be unfinished business. The Berghof is not done with Bernie yet.

riverrun

At the Strangers' Gate

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

'A dazzling talent' Malcolm GladwellWhen Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers' Gate builds a portrait of this particular moment in New York through the story of this couple's journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side, and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. He takes us through his professional meanderings, from graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the corridors of Conde Nast and the galleries of MoMA. Between tender and humorous reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others, Gopnik discusses the ethics of ambition, the economy of creative capital, and the peculiar anthropology of art and aspiration in New York, then and now.

Quercus

The Hourglass

Tracy Rees
Authors:
Tracy Rees

'Tracy Rees writes from the heart' Kathryn Hughes, author of The Letter. Perfect for fans of The Keeper of Lost Things and The Villa in Italy.2014. Nora has always taken success for granted, until suddenly her life begins to fall apart. Troubled by anxiety and nightmares, she finds herself drawn to the sweeping beaches of Tenby, a place she's only been once before. Together with a local girl she rents a beautiful townhouse and slowly begins to settle in to her new life. But Tenby hides a secret, and Nora will soon discover that this little town by the sea has the power to heal even the most painful memories.1950. Chloe visits Tenby every summer. She stays with relatives, and spends the long, idyllic days on the beach. Every year is the same, until she meets a glamorous older boy and is instantly smitten. But on the night of their first date, Chloe comes to a realisation, the aftermath of which could haunt her forever.The Hourglass is a moving novel about finding love even after it seems too late and the healing power of a magical place by the sea.

MacLehose Press

The Longest Night

Otto de Kat
Authors:
Otto de Kat

A masterpiece of literary craft and concision; sparse, beautiful and hugely affecting - Daily MailSince the liberation of the Netherlands, Emma Verweij has been living in Rotterdam, in a street which became a stronghold of friendships for its inhabitants during the Second World War. She marries Bruno, they have two sons, and she determines to block out the years she spent in Nazi Berlin during the war, with her first husband Carl. But now, ninety-six years old and on the eve of her death, long- forgotten memories crowd again into her consciousness, flashbacks of happier years, and the tragedy of the war, of Carl, of her father, and of the friends she has lost. In The Longest Night, his impressive, reflective new novel after News from Berlin, Otto de Kat deftly distils momentous events of 20th-century history into the lives of his characters. In Emma, the past and the present coincide in limpid fragments of rare, melancholy beauty.Translated from the Dutch by Laura Watkinson

MacLehose Press

The Bickford Fuse

Andrey Kurkov
Authors:
Andrey Kurkov
Jo Fletcher Books

Rock Fix

Trevor Hoyle
Authors:
Trevor Hoyle

The Black Knights are finally on the road to stardom. Not so long ago they were just five Northern lads trying - and failing - to make the big time; a band no one had ever heard of, with nothing else to do except keep chasing a seemingly unattainable dream. But then along came Phil Martins, a streetwise roadie determined to turn them into a proper band. Suddenly, courtesy of Phil, they have everything they could ever want: drink, drugs, girls - and, finally, a recording contract. But fame comes at a price, and someday soon they'll have to pay.

Quercus

Betrayed

Anna Smith
Authors:
Anna Smith

Quercus

Screams in the Dark

Anna Smith
Authors:
Anna Smith
riverrun

Come to the Edge

Joanna Kavenna
Authors:
Joanna Kavenna
Quercus

'I Have a Dream'

Terry Breverton
Authors:
Terry Breverton

Andrey Kurkov

Born near Leningrad in 1961, Kurkov was a journalist, prison warder, cameraman and screenplay-writer before his novels took off. He received "hundreds of rejections" and was a pioneer of self-publishing, selling more than 75,000 copies of his books in a single year. His novel Death and the Penguin, his first in English translation, was an international bestseller, drawing acclaim from all quarters. He lives in Kiev with his English wife and their three children.

Joanna Kavenna

Joanna Kavenna is the author of The Ice Museum, Inglorious (which won the Orange Prize for New Writing), The Birth of Love, Come to the Edge and A Field Guide to Reality. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, Spectator, London Review of Books and New York Times and she has held writing fellowships at St Antony's College Oxford and St John's College Cambridge. In 2011 she was named as one of the Telegraph's 20 Writers Under 40 and in 2013 was listed as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. She lives in Oxfordshire.

John Ajvide Lindqvist

John Ajvide Lindqvist is a Swedish author, born in 1968. He grew up in Blackeberg, a suburb of Stockholm. He wanted to become something awful and fantastic. First he became a conjurer and came in second in the Nordic card trick championship. Then he was a stand-up comedian for twelve years, before writing Let the Right One In. That novel became a phenomenal international bestseller and was made into a film and a West End play, both called Let Me In. His books are published in twenty-nine countries worldwide.

Oly Ralfe

Oly Ralfe is an artist, film-maker and musician. He collaborated with The Mighty Boosh and has recorded four music albums as Ralfe Band, including the soundtrack to the film Bunny and The Bull. His documentary films and music videos have won several awards.

Philip Kerr

Philip Kerr is the author of the internationally bestselling Bernie Gunther novels. If the Dead Rise Not won the CWA Ellis Peters Award for Best Historical Novel. His other books include several stand-alone thrillers and acclaimed series for children. He lives in south-west London.

Tom Rachman

Born in London and raised in Vancouver, Tom Rachman was a foreign correspondent for the Associated Press stationed in Rome, then an editor at the International Herald Tribune in Paris. He is the author of two novels, the international bestseller The Imperfectionists; The Rise and Fall of Great Powers and a short stories collection Basket of Deplorables. He lives in London.

Trevor Hoyle

Trevor Hoyle was born in Lancashire, and started out as an actor before moving to the other side of the screen as a full-time writer. His award-winning short fiction and novels range from hard-edged thrillers to comedy to science fiction, including his most recent blockbuster, the eco-thriller The Last Gasp. He has also written for the radio (his first radio play, GIGO, won the Radio Times Drama Award) and TV, including the cult TV series Blake's 7; his bestselling novelisations include Blake's 7, which he co-wrote with Terry Nation, the show's creator, followed by Blake's 7: Project Avalon and Blake's 7: Scorpio Attack. His novel Rule of Night was a Time Out Book of the Week. He's also won the Transatlantic Review Erotic Fiction Award and the Ray Mort Northern Novel Award. After travelling the world, he returned to his roots, and once again lives in Lancashire.