Related to: 'The Black Friar'

Quercus

Destroying Angel

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

'A gripping tale of crime and sedition' Sunday Times on The Black Friar'The best historical crime novel of the year' Sunday Express on The SeekerCaptain Damian Seeker has gone north. Charged with preparing the way for the rule of the major-generals, he is now under the command of Colonel Robert Lilburne at York. But when Lilburne orders him to a small village on the North York moors with details of the stringent new anti-Royalist laws, Seeker finds that what should be a routine visit will reveal a plot to rival anything in scheming LondonAn invitation to dinner at the house of local businessman Matthew Pullan lifts the lid on the bubbling cauldron of grudges and resentment that is Faithly village. The local constable, drunk on the tiny bit of power he holds, using it to avenge old resentments. The hated lord of the manor, the last of a staunchly Royalist family who has managed to avoid suspicion of treachery - for now. The vicar on trial for his job and his home, accused of ungodly acts. And the Pullans themselves, proudly Puritan but disillusioned with Cromwell's government, respected and despised in Faithly in equal measure. The man for whom this unlikely gathering was organised - The Trier, the enforcer of Puritan morality for the local villages - hasn't shown up. And by the end of the night, on of those gathered around Matthew Pullan's table will be fatally poisoned.Seeker must discover the motive behind the death - mushroom misidentification, petty revenge, or part of a larger plot against Cromwell's government in the north? But who in Faithly can he trust? And when the most painful part of his past reappears after eleven years, will the Seeker meet his match?

Quercus

The Seeker

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Winner of the 2015 CWA Endeavour Dagger for Historical FictionLondon, 1654. Oliver Cromwell is at the height of his power and has declared himself Lord Protector. Yet he has many enemies, at home and abroad. London is a complex web of spies and merchants, priests and soldiers, exiles and assassins. One of the web's most fearsome spiders is Damian Seeker, agent of the Lord Protector. No one knows where Seeker comes from, who his family is, or even his real name. All that is known of him for certain is that he is utterly loyal to Cromwell, and that nothing can be long hidden from him. In the city, coffee houses are springing up, fashionable places where men may meet to plot and gossip. Suddenly they are ringing with news of a murder. John Winter, hero of Cromwell's all-powerful army, is dead, and the lawyer, Elias Ellingworth, found standing over the bleeding body, clutching a knife. Yet despite the damning evidence, Seeker is not convinced of Ellingworth's guilt. He will stop at nothing to bring the killer to justice: and Seeker knows better than any man where to search.

Quercus

The Devil's Recruit

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Quercus

Crucible

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

Crucible of Secrets

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Quercus

A Game of Sorrows

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

The Redemption of Alexander Seaton

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Alison Littlewood

Alison Littlewood is the author of A Cold Season, published by Jo Fletcher Books. The novel was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club, where it was described as "perfect reading for a dark winter's night." Her most recent novel, The Hidden People, has recently been published to critical acclaim.Alison's short stories have been picked for Best British Horror 2015, The Best Horror of the Year and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. She also won the 2014 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction with her story The Dog's Home, published in The Spectral Book of Horror Stories.Alison lives with her partner Fergus in Yorkshire, England, in a house of creaking doors and crooked walls. You can talk to her on twitter @Ali__L, see her on Facebook and visit her at www.alisonlittlewood.co.uk.

Andrea Maria Schenkel

Andrea Maria Schenkel lives with her family near Regensburg, in Bavaria, Germany. On publication in Germany, Tannöd won first place in the German Crime Prize as well as the Friedrich-Glauser Prize.

Andrew Caldecott

Andrew Caldecott was seized by the notion of a city-state hiding a cataclysmic secret while studying history at New College Oxford. After graduating, he went on to become one of the country's top QCs specialising in media, defamation and libel law. He represented the BBC in the Hutton Inquiry (into the death of biological warfare expert and UN weapons inspector David Kelly), the Guardian in the Leveson Inquiry (into the British press following the phone-hacking scandal), and supermodel Naomi Campbell in her landmark privacy case, among many others. This hasn't left him much time for writing, but the rich, layered world of Rotherweird has been nagging in the background of his mind for many years, and has at last burst into blossom, at once of-the-moment, historic and timeless. Rotherweird is followed by a sequel, Wyntertide, both published by Jo Fletcher Books.

Andrew Greig

Andrew Greig is the author of six books of poetry, two mountaineering books; two non-fiction books and six novels. He has been shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize, and won the Saltire and the Scottish Book of the Year awards. He lives in Orkney and Edinburgh with his wife, the novelist Lesley Glaister.

Daniel Kehlmann

Daniel Kehlmann was born in Munich in 1975 and lives in Vienna, Berlin and New York. He has published six novels: Measuring the World, Me & Kaminski Fame, F and You Should Have Left and has won numerous prizes, including the Candide Prize, the Literature Prize of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation, the Doderer Prize, The Kleist Prize, the WELT Literature Prize, and the Thomas Mann Prize. Measuring the World was translated into more than forty languages and is one of the biggest successes in post-war German literature.

Elizabeth Gill

Elizabeth Gill was born in Newcastle upon Tyne and as a child lived in Tow Law, a small mining town on the Durham fells. She has been a published author for more than thirty years and has written more than forty books. She lives in Durham City, likes the awful weather in the north east and writes best when rain is lashing the windows.

Eva Rice

Eva Rice has written three novels and one non-fiction book. She is married to a musician and has three children. She lives in London.

Jaan Kross

Jaan Kross is Estonia's best-known and most widely translated author. He was born in Tallinn in 1920 and lived much of his life under either Soviet or German occupation. He won countless awards for his writing, including The National Cultural Award, The Amnesty International Golden Flame and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. He died in 2007.

James Heneage

James Heneage is the founder of the Ottakars chain of bookshops and the co-founder of the Chalke Valley History Festival. He has been fascinated by history, in particular Byzantine history, since a child. He now lives part of the year in the Peloponnese, where he has written much of his fiction to date. Otherwise he lives near Salisbury with his wife and family.

Kimberley Freeman

Kimberley Freeman was born in London and grew up in Brisbane. She is the author of Duet (2007), winner of the Ruby Award, Gold Dust (2008), Wildflower Hill (2010), Lighthouse Bay (2012), Ember Island (2013) and Evergreen Falls (2014). Her bestselling books have been translated into over twelve languages. For more information visit facebook.com/KimberleyFreemanAuthor, read her blog on kimberleyfreeman.com or follow her on twitter.com/KimberleyTweets.

Laurie Graham

Laurie Graham is a former Daily Telegraph columnist and contributing editor of She magazine. The author of several acclaimed novels, most recently The Grand Duchess of Nowhere and The Night in Question (2015), Laurie lives in Dublin. Visit her website at www.lauriegraham.com

Luca D'Andrea

Luca D'Andrea was born in 1979 Bolzano, Italy, where he worked as a teacher for ten years. The Mountain, the most talked-about and fastest-selling book at London Book Fair 2016, was sold in more than 30 countries before it was first published in Italy.

Markus Heitz

Markus Heitz studied history and German language and literature at university before turning to writing. His debut novel Schatten über Ulldart (the first in a series of epic fantasy novels) won the Deutscher Phantastik Preis (German Fantasy Award) in 2003, and was followed by his bestselling Dwarves and the tie-in Aelfar series, which have made him one of Germany's - and Europe's - most successful fantasy authors. He currently lives in Zweibrücken, Germany.