Related to: 'The Food of Love'

Quercus

The Prodigal Daughter

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith

The second book in the Food of Love trilogy about an extended Anglo/Italian family in the ever-growing restaurant trade. Rebellious daughter, Angelica Angelotti, wants to strike out on her own away from the family. But some bad choices - including picking the wrong partner - lead to heart-wrenching consequences. Angelica has grown up in the family restaurant business started by her Italian father, Giovanni, and his English wife, Laura. Surrounded by gorgeous Italian food, now she wants to try something different. Defying her father's wishes, she moves to Paris to learn French cuisine. There, caught up in the excitement and emotion of the May '68 student riots, she falls in love with a charismatic but unreliable man. Back in London with him, Angelica's future career blossoms at the Savoy Hotel and further develops when she becomes a food writer. What happens to her marriage is another matter and her parents' concerns are proved painfully justified. Moving back to run the inn on her family's estate in Gloucestershire may feel like failure, but little does Angelica know that what awaits her there is the greatest challenge of her life - and a second chance at love.

Quercus

Sisters

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith

Growing up in the outback of South Africa, sensible Poppy realized she would always have to look out for her younger sister, the beautiful, wild, and unreliable Carrie. Years later, in London, Poppy, a stage actress with three children and a charming, handsome husband, never imagines that Carrie, now a sexy and passionate caterer, would try to hurt her. But Carrie can't help herself. She's resentful that Poppy has everything she always wanted: a successful, fulfilling career, a gorgeous husband, a loving family, a house in the country, while Carrie has nothing but debts, one-night-stands, and an uncertain future. Carrie discovers the chink in Poppy's armor, her husband Eduardo, and she sets out to exploit it in the way she knows best. She provides Eduardo with danger, excitement, and great sex - all things that have faded in Eduardo and Poppy's marriage. But in destroying her sister's peace of mind, Carrie risks losing all those who love her. Prue Leith has written a poignant and moving story about the real choices siblings have to make once they grow up and start taking stock of their lives. Sisters is a brilliantly crafted portrait of sibling rivalry, love, and the ultimate betrayal.

Quercus

Leaving Patrick

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith

Successful City lawyer Jane is leaving her husband, Patrick. She feels there must be more to life than stability and looming middle-age. She goes to India in search of passion, excitement, and a fresh start. What happens there makes her question the life she's led so far: Does her career always have to come first? And has she thrown away true love by mistake?

Quercus

Relish

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith
Quercus

The Gardener

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith
Quercus

A Serving of Scandal

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith

People just love a scandal . . . Kate McKinnon is thirty-six and mother to five-year-old Toby. She used to be a restaurant chef, but then Toby came along. Now she has a small but thriving catering business. Her life is on an even keel but that's about to change.She gets a job cooking lunch at the Foreign Office and there she has her first fateful meeting with Oliver Stapler, Secretary of State. Married and a father, he's totally out of bounds, yet she falls for him. Though she tries to keep her feelings secret, rumours start to fly. When someone alerts the gutter press, who cares whether Kate's affair with Oliver is true or not?

Quercus

Choral Society

Prue Leith
Authors:
Prue Leith

Friendship, sex, shopping, singing - even love: life doesn't end at fifty. But Lucy, recently widowed, a food journalist who's lost her job, and Joanna, successful business woman facing a future alone, secretly fear that it might. Only much divorced Rebecca is ever confident of happiness just round the corner. The women have joined a choir for very different reasons. Lucy is obeying her bossy daughter who prescribes singing as a cure for grief. For Joanna failure is not an option and she's tackling her inability to sing a note. And Rebecca is unashamedly looking for a new mate. When these three women decide to combine their talents to turn a run-down hotel on the Cornish coast into a spa offering holiday courses, conflict is bound to result. It's clear that the choir has taught them a good deal more than how to sing.

Alison Littlewood

Alison Littlewood is the author of A Cold Season, published by Jo Fletcher Books. The novel was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club, where it was described as "perfect reading for a dark winter's night." Her most recent novel, The Hidden People, has recently been published to critical acclaim.Alison's short stories have been picked for Best British Horror 2015, The Best Horror of the Year and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. She also won the 2014 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction with her story The Dog's Home, published in The Spectral Book of Horror Stories.Alison lives with her partner Fergus in Yorkshire, England, in a house of creaking doors and crooked walls. You can talk to her on twitter @Ali__L, see her on Facebook and visit her at www.alisonlittlewood.co.uk.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Daniel Kehlmann

Daniel Kehlmann was born in Munich in 1975 and lives in Vienna, Berlin and New York. He has published six novels: Measuring the World, Me & Kaminski Fame, F and You Should Have Left and has won numerous prizes, including the Candide Prize, the Literature Prize of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation, the Doderer Prize, The Kleist Prize, the WELT Literature Prize, and the Thomas Mann Prize. Measuring the World was translated into more than forty languages and is one of the biggest successes in post-war German literature.

Domenica De Rosa

Domenica de Rosa started her career working at the Bookseller, and went on to work in children's publishing, in publicity and in editorial. Under the name Elly Griffiths she is the author of the acclaimed and bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway series of mysteries, and the Stephens and Mephisto mysteries. Domenica is half-Italian and loves the Tuscan coast, although she mainly settles for Brighton, where she lives with her husband, their twins and their cat.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing for many years. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Hester Browne

Hester Browne is the author of numerous bestselling novels including The Little Lady Agency in the Big Apple, The Finishing Touches and Swept Off Her Feet. She divides her time between London and Herefordshire.

Hideo Yokoyama

Hideo Yokoyama (Author)Born in 1957, Hideo Yokoyama worked for twelve years as an investigative reporter with a regional newspaper north of Tokyo, before becoming one of Japan's most acclaimed fiction writers. His exhaustive and relentless work ethic is known to mirror the intense and obsessive behaviour of his characters; and in January 2003 he was hospitalized following a heart attack brought about by working constantly for seventy-two hours. Six Four is his sixth novel, and his first to be published in the English language.Jonathan Lloyd-Davies (Translator)Jonathan Lloyd-Davies studied Japanese at Durham and Chinese at Oxford; he currently works as a translator of Japanese fiction. His translations include Edge by Koji Suzuki, with co-translator Camellia Nieh, the Demon Hunters trilogy by Baku Yumemakura, Gray Men by Tomotake Ishikawa, and Nan-Core by Mahokaru Numata. His translation of Edge received the Shirley Jackson award for best novel. Originally from Wales, he now resides in Tokyo.

Joanna Bolouri

Joanna Bolouri worked in sales before she began writing professionally at the age of thirty. Winning a BBC comedy script competition allowed her to work and write with stand-up comedians, comedy scriptwriters and actors from across the UK. She's had articles and reviews published in The Skinny, the Scottish Sun, the Huffington Post and HecklerSpray. She lives in Glasgow with her daughter.

Joël Dicker

Joël Dicker was born in Geneva in 1985, where he studied Law. The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair was nominated for the Prix Goncourt and won the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens. It has sold more than 3.6 million copies in 42 countries. The Baltimore Boys, at once a prequel and a sequel, has sold more than 750,000 in France.

John Ajvide Lindqvist

John Ajvide Lindqvist is a Swedish author, born in 1968. He grew up in Blackeberg, a suburb of Stockholm. He wanted to become something awful and fantastic. First he became a conjurer and came in second in the Nordic card trick championship. Then he was a stand-up comedian for twelve years, before writing Let the Right One In. That novel became a phenomenal international bestseller and was made into a film and a West End play, both called Let Me In. His books are published in twenty-nine countries worldwide.

Kate McQuaile

Kate McQuaile is a graduate of the Faber novel-writing course. She lives in London and works as a journalist, but is originally from Drogheda in Ireland.

Linda Green

Linda Green is an award-winning journalist and has written for the Guardian, the Independent on Sunday and the Big Issue. Linda lives in West Yorkshire.

Louise O'Neill

Louise O'Neill is the feminist powerhouse and outspoken voice for change whose novels Only Ever Yours and Asking for It helped to start important conversations about body image and consent. Asking for It won Book of the Year at the Irish Book Awards 2015 and stayed in the Irish Top Ten fiction chart for over a year. Only Ever Yours won Newcomer of the Year at the Irish Book Awards and the Bookseller YA Prize. Film/TV rights have been optioned on both books. Louise lives and works in West Cork, Ireland. She contributes regularly to Irish TV and radio, and has a weekly column in the Irish Examiner.