Related to: 'Dodger of the Revolution'

Dodger's London

The Artful Dodger's guide to his London patch

Heron Books

Dodger of the Dials

James Benmore
James Benmore

The Artful Dodger is back doing what he does best: stealing, charming and leading a gang of petty thieves from the Seven Dials. But crime in London has become a serious business - and when Jack needs protection he soon finds himself out of his depth and facing the gallows for murder. The evidence against him seems insurmountable, until a young reporter by the name of Oliver Twist takes up his cause. Can they extricate Dodger from Newgate in time to escape the noose and save that which he treasures most, or is he destined for Fagin's fate?Prepare for a thrilling adventure through Dickensian London with one of literature's most memorable rogues.The second instalment in James Benmore's acclaimed Dodger series.

Heron Books


James Benmore
James Benmore

London, 1850s. After five years in an Australian penal colony, the Artful Dodger returns to London in search of a hidden fortune. Unaware of the fate that befell Twist, Fagin and Sikes, Dodger revisits the criminal underworld of Dickensian London to seek out his old comrades, any of whom might possess the key to the treasure. He finds the city a changed place from his youth: with law and order upheld by a new police force, Fagin gone to the gallows, his old gang scattered and danger around every corner.

Anthea Bell

Anthea Bell

Antonin Varenne

Antonin Varenne was awarded the Prix Michel Lebrun and the Grand Prix du Jury Sang d'encre for Bed of Nails, his first novel to be translated into English. His second, Loser's Corner was awarded the Prix des Lecteurs Quais du polar - 20 minutes and the Prix du Meilleur Polar Francophone.

David Hair

David Hair, an award-winning writer of fantasy, has been inspired by his travels around the globe. He was born in New Zealand and after spending time in Britain and Europe, he moved to India for several years, which sparked both the Moontide Quartet and the Ravana series. He now lives in Bangkok, Thailand. His epic fantasy sagas The Moontide Quartet and The Sunsurge Quartet, and The Return of Ravana, his retelling of the Indian epic The Ramayana, are all published by Jo Fletcher Books.

Dov Alfon

Born and brought up in Paris, Dov Alfon is a former intelligence officer of Unit 8200. He was editor in chief of Israel's most influential newspaper, Ha'aretz, and chief editor of the leading publishing house Kinneret-Zmora. His previous projects have been called "fantastically creative" by The Guardian, "revolutionary" by The Paris Review and "incredibly inspiring" by The New Yorker. This is his first work of fiction.

Edmonde Charles-Roux

Edmonde Charles-Roux served as a nurse and a Resistance worker in World War II, before beginning a career as a journalist writing for Elle and Paris Match. For twelve years she was Editor-in-Chief of the French edition of Vogue. She has written another biography, Don Juan of Austria, and two novels, Elle, Adrienne and To Forget Palermo, which won the Prix Goncourt. Nancy Amphoux is the translator of many major biographies, including those of Tolstoy, Turgenev and Pushkin.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Guadalupe Nettel

Guadalupe Nettel, a Bogotá 39 author and Granta "Best Untranslated Writer," has received numerous prestigious awards, including the Gilberto Owen National Literature Prize, the Antonin Artaud Prize, the Ribera del Duero Short Fiction Award, and most recently the 2014 Herralde Novel Prize for After the Winter.

Iain Gale

Iain Gale, art critic, journalist and author, comes from a military family and has always been fascinated by military history. He is an active member of the Scottish Committee of the Society of Authors and the Friends of Waterloo Committee. He is the Editor of Scotland in Trust, the magazine for the National Trust of Scotland, and founded the Caledonian magazine. He lives in Edinburgh.

James Benmore

James Benmore studied literature at the Open University and has since completed an MSt in Creative Writing at Oxford University. He won the AM Heath prize in 2010 for best work of fiction by a writer graduating from Kellogg College. His short stories have been published in various anthologies. He lives in London.

James Heneage

James Heneage is the founder of the Ottakars chain of bookshops and the co-founder of the Chalke Valley History Festival. He has been fascinated by history, in particular Byzantine history, since a child. He now lives part of the year in the Peloponnese, where he has written much of his fiction to date. Otherwise he lives near Salisbury with his wife and family.

Karim Miské

Born in 1964 in Abidjan to a Mauritanian father and a French mother, Karim Miské grew up in Paris before leaving to study journalism in Dakar. He now lives in France, and is making documentary films on a wide range of subjects including deafness, for which he learned sign language, and the common roots between the Jewish and Islamic religions. Arab Jazz is the author's first novel.

Marie NDiaye

Marie NDiaye was born in France in 1967. She published her first novel at seventeen, and has won the Prix Femina (Rosie Carpe in 2001) and the Prix Goncourt (Three Strong Women, 2009). Her play Papa Doit Manger has been taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française. In 2007, after the election of Nicolas Sarkozy, NDiaye left France with her family to live in Berlin.

Mathias Malzieu

Born in 1974 in Montpellier in France, Mathias Malzieu is an established bestselling writer, as well as the lead singer of French pop group Dionysos. His international bestseller The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart has sold over 1 million copies around the world, and was turned into an animated feature film by Luc Besson. He has written 4 other novels. He has been described by Iggy Pop as 'Francois Truffaut with a rock 'n' roll band'.

Patrick Easter

Patrick Easter was a police officer in the Met for thirty years and during that time was part of the Marine Police force. On retirement, he became a successful journalist writing both for technical journals and the national press. His stint with the Marine Police coupled with a love of 18th Century history make him the perfect author for this subject.

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano was born in Paris, France in 1945. He was the recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. He previously won the 2012 Austrian State Prize for European Literature, the 2010 Prix mondial Cino Del Duca from the Institut de France for lifetime achievement, the 1978 Prix Goncourt for Rue des boutiques obscures, and the 1972 Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française for Les Boulevards de ceinture.

Per Olov Enquist

Per Olov Enquist was born in 1934 in a small village in Norrland, the northern part of Sweden. He is one of Sweden's leading contemporary writers, both as a novelist and a playwright. He has twice won the August Prize for fiction, the most prestigious Swedish literary prize, and was awarded the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for The Visit of the Royal Physician.

Pierre Lemaitre

Pierre Lemaitre was born in Paris in 1951. He worked for many years as a teacher of literature before becoming a novelist. He was awarded the Crime Writers' Association International Dagger, alongside Fred Vargas, for Alex, and as sole winner for Camille. In 2013 his novel Au revoir là-haut (The Great Swindle, in English translation) won the Prix Goncourt, France's leading literary award.

Rob Lofthouse

Robert Lofthouse was born in Twickenham and joined his local county infantry regiment (1 PWRR) straight from school at the age of sixteen. After serving 20 years, having served in Poland, Germany, Kenya, Canada, Falkland Islands, Iraq, Northern Ireland, and Kosovo, he retired in the rank of Sergeant.He now works as a defence consultant and lives in Portsmouth with his wife and three children.