Related to: 'Blackwater'

D. A. Mishani

D. A. Mishani is a former editor of Israeli fiction and international crime literature, as well as a literary scholar specialising in the history of detective literature. He lives in Tel Aviv and writes full time.

Dany Laferrière

Dany Laferrière is a francophone Haitian and Canadian novelist and journalist. Born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and raised in Petit Goâve, Laferrière worked as a journalist in Haiti before moving to Canada in 1976. David Homel was born and raised in Chicago in 1952 of East European stock. He left at the end of the tumultuous 1960s and lived in Europe and Toronto before moving to Montreal in 1980.

Dorothy Koomson

Dorothy Koomson is the author of seven novels - The Cupid Effect, The Chocolate Run, My Best Friend's Girl, Marshmallows for Breakfast, Goodnight, Beautiful, The Ice Cream Girls and The Woman He Loved Before, all of them Sunday Times bestsellers. Dorothy is currently working on another book and a screenplay. She lives in Brighton.

Duncan Jepson

Duncan Jepson is the award-winning director and producer of five feature films. He has also produced documentaries for Discovery Channel Asia and the National Geographic channel. A founder and former managing editor of the Asia Literary Review, he is a social commentator on Asia, and regularly writes for the New York Times, Publishing Perspectives and South China Morning Post. He is a lawyer and lives in Hong Kong.

Eduardo Mendoza

Eduardo Mendoza was born in Barcelona in 1943. He studied Law and worked as an U.N. interpreter in the United States for nine years. Prior to An Englishman in Madrid, his most acclaimed work was The City of Marvels. Nick Caistor's translations include The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vázquez Montalban and works by Eduardo Mendoza, Juan Marsé, Alan Pauls and Guillermo Orsi.

Elia Barceló

Elia Barceló was born in Alicante in 1957 and teaches Spanish Language and Literature at the University of Innsbruck. She made her name in science-fiction, but with books such as Heart of Tango she is fast gaining the wider readership that she so richly deserves. David Frye's translations include Thine Is the Kingdom (1999) and Distant Palaces (2004) by Cuban novelist Abilio Estévez, and The Curriculum Vitae of Aurora Ortiz (2005) by Spanish novelist Almudena Solana.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing for many years. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Georges Perec

Georges Perec, born 1936, decided to be a writer at around the age of eighteen, but had a day job as a librarian in a medical research laboratory for most of his adult life. He made his first impact in 1965 with a barely fictional portrait of his own generation, Things. Shortly after, he joined Oulipo, the experimental "workshop" for mathematics and literature founded by Raymond Queneau and Francois Le Lionnais, of which he became the most ardent and celebrated doyen. He is the author of A Void, a novel written without the letter "e", of the semi-autobiographical W or The Memory of Childhood, and, most famously, of Life A User's Manual, hailed by Italo Calvino as "the last real 'event' in the history of the novel so far". He lived in Paris, and died of lung cancer in 1982. Portrait of a Man, written in 1960, remained unpublished in French until 2012. publication.

Guillermo Orsi

Guillermo Orsi was born in Buenos Aires, where he still lives and works as a journalist. His previous novel Sueños de perro won the Semana Negra Umbriel Award in 2004.Nick Caistor's many translations from the Spanish include The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vázquez Montalban and the works of Juan Marsé and Alan Pauls.

Hazel Osmond

Hazel Osmond has been an advertising copywriter for nearly twenty years, working on a variety of accounts, from house builders to building societies; furniture stores to museums. She has won the Woman & Home short story competition sponsored by Costa and the Yeovil short story prize, and her first romantic comedy Who's Afraid of Mr Wolfe?', was shortlisted for the Romantic Comedy of the Year by the UK's Romantic Novelists' Association in 2012. She has gone on to write three further romantic comedies and a range of short stories published in magazines. Northumberland is her home and, when not writing, she is a pain to live with.

Heather O'Neill

Heather O'Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist. Lullabies for Little Criminals, her debut novel, was published in 2007 to international critical acclaim and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her second novel, The Girl who was Saturday Night, was longlisted for the Baileys Women's Fiction Prize, and shortlisted for the Giller Prize, as was her collection of short stories, Daydreams of Angels. Her third novel, The Lonely Hearts Hotel was longlisted for the Baileys prize. Born and raised in Montreal, O'Neill lives there today with her daughter.

Jérôme Ferrari

Jerôme Ferrari was born in Paris in 1968. His first novel in English translation, Where I Left My Soul was the winner of the Prix du roman France Televisions, the Prix Initiales, the Prix Larbaud, and the Grand Prix Poncetton de la SGDL in its French edition. His second, The Sermon on the Fall of Rome, was the winner of the 2012 Prix Goncourt, confirming his status as one of France's outstanding young literary talents.

Jim Shepard

Jim Shepard is the National Book Award-finalist and highly acclaimed author of seven novels and five collections of stories, including The Book of Aron and Like You'd Understand, Anyway. He lives in Massachusetts with his family and teaches creative writing at the historic liberal arts establishment Williams College. Widely acclaimed as one of the US's finest writers, The World to Come is the first collection of his short stories to be published in the UK.

Jo Spain

Jo Spain has worked as a journalist and a party advisor on the economy in the Irish parliament. Her first novel, With Our Blessing, was one of seven books shortlisted in the Richard and Judy Search for a Bestseller competition and went on to be a top-ten bestseller in Ireland. Joanne lives in Dublin with her husband and their four young children.

Joan Sales

Joan Sales (1912-1983) was a Catalan writer, translator and publisher. He obtained a Law degree in 1932 and was a member of regional anarchist and communist groups. In the Civil War he fought on the Madrid and Aragonese fronts before going into exile in France in 1939. He moved to Mexico in 1942, returning to Catalonia in 1948, after which he began working as a publisher. Uncertain Glory, his crucial testament, was first published in 1956, though a combination of censorship and Sales' tendency towards revision meant that a definitive edition was not available until many years later.

Joseph Farrell

Joseph Farrell is Emeritus Professor at the University of Strathclyde. He is a renowned translator from the Italian, whose translations include works by Leonardo Sciascia, Vincenzo Consolo, Dario Fo and Valerio Varesi.

JP Delaney

The Girl Before is the first psychological thriller from JP Delaney, a pseudonym for a writer who has previously written bestselling fiction under other names. It is being published in thirty-five countries. A film version is being brought to the screen by Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard.

Juan Marsé

Juan Marsé was born in 1933 in Barcelona. He is a Spanish novelist and screenwriter, and has won numerous awards for both his novels, most recently the 2008 Cervantes Prize.Nick Caistor's translations include The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vázquez Montalban and works by Eduardo Mendoza, Juan Marsé and Alan Pauls.

Jussi Adler-Olsen

Jussi Adler-Olsen is Denmark's number one crime writer and a New York Times bestseller. His books routinely top the bestseller lists in Europe and have sold more than sixteen million copies around the world. His many prestigious Nordic crime-writing awards include the Glass Key Award, also won by Henning Mankell, Jo Nesbø and Stieg Larsson.