Related to: 'Larchfield'

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Tiger

Polly Clark
Authors:
Polly Clark

The breathtaking new novel from the prize-winning author of Larchfield ('Gripping' Margaret Atwood - 'Captivating' Louis de Bernières - 'Magical and transcendent' John Boyne)Set across two continents, Tiger is a sweeping story of survival and redeeming love that plunges the reader into one of the world's last wildernesses with blistering authenticity. Frieda is a primatologist, sensitive and solitary, until a violent attack shatters her ordered world. In her new role as a zookeeper, she confronts a very different ward: an injured wild tiger.Deep in the Siberian taiga, Tomas, a Russian conservationist, fears that the natural order has toppled. The king tiger has been killed by poachers and a spectacular tigress now patrols his vast territory as her own.In a winter of treacherous competition, the path of the tigress and her cub crosses with an Udeghe huntress and her daughter. Vengeance must follow, and the fates of both tigers and people are transformed.Learning of her tiger's past offers Frieda the chance of freedom. Faced with the savage forces of nature, she must trust to her instinct and, like the tiger, find a way to live in the world.

C.K. Stead

C.K. Stead is the renowned author of poetry, literary criticism, short stories, and of novels such as Mansfield and My Name Was Judas. He was awarded the C.B.E. for services to New Zealand literature and was the winner of the 2010 Sunday Times Short Story Award.

Cees Nooteboom

Cees Nooteboom was born in The Hague in 1933, and now lives in Amsterdam and on the island of Minorca. He is a poet, a novelist and a travel writer whose books include Rituals (1983), The Following Story (1994), Roads to Santiago (1997) and All Souls' Day (2001).

Celia Hawkesworth

Celia Hawkesworth was Reader in Serbian and Croatian at University College London. Among her translations are work by Dubravka Ugresic and Ivo Andric. Her translation of Dasa Drndic's Belladonna was a finalist for the inaugural E.B.R.D. Prize in 2018, and shortlisted for the Oxford-WeidenfeldTranslation Prize and the Warwick Prize for Translation.

Chochana Boukhobza

Chochana Boukhobza is a novelist of Tunisian-Jewish descent. Her first novel, A Summer in Jerusalem, won the Prix Mediterranée in 1986. Her second novel Le Cri was a finalist for the 1987 Prix Femina. Alison Anderson's translations include Muriel Barbery's bestselling novel The Elegance of the Hedgehog and The Breakers by Claudie Gallay, from MacLehose Press.

Claudie Gallay

Claudie Gallay is a teacher who lives in Provence. Her previous novels have all been well received, but The Breakers was her breakthrough novel, becoming a runaway bestseller in France. Alison Anderson's translations include Muriel Barbery's bestselling novel The Elegance of the Hedgehog. She is also the author of two novels, Hidden Latitudes and Darwin's Wink. She lives in Switzerland.

Daša Drndic

Dasa Drndic was a distinguished Croatian novelist and playwright. She was also been a translator, and a lecturer at the Faculty of Philosophy in Rijeka. Trieste (2012), her first novel to be translated into English, was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and has now been translated into many other languages. It was followed by Leica Format (2015) and Belladonna (2017). Belladonna has been shortlisted for both the inaugural EBRD prize and the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize and received stunning reviews. Dasa Drndic died in June 2018.

Daniel Glattauer

Daniel Glattauer was born in Vienna in 1960 and works there as a journalist and writer. Since 1989 he has been a columnist for Der Standard, and three collections of his articles have been published in book form. Love Virtually, and its sequel Every Seventh Wave, have both sold millions of copies in Germany, and were adapted into BBC radio plays starring David Tennant and Emilia Fox.

David Hair

David Hair, an award-winning writer of fantasy, has been inspired by his travels around the globe. He was born in New Zealand and after spending time in Britain and Europe, he moved to India for several years, which sparked both the Moontide Quartet and the Ravana series. He now lives in Bangkok, Thailand. His epic fantasy sagas The Moontide Quartet and The Sunsurge Quartet, and The Return of Ravana, his retelling of the Indian epic The Ramayana, are all published by Jo Fletcher Books.

David Lagercrantz

David Lagercrantz was born in 1962, and is an acclaimed author and journalist. In 2015 The Girl in the Spider's Web, his continuation of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy, became a worldwide bestseller, and it was announced that Lagercrantz would write two further novels in the series. He is also the author of the acclaimed and bestselling I am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and Fall of Man in Wilmslow.

Derek Robinson

Derek Robinson¿s acclaimed First World War trilogy and Piece of Cake have established him as the world¿s best aviation writer and one of the top authors of war fiction.

Didier Decoin

Didier Decoin was twenty when he published his first book, Le Procès à l'amour. It was followed by some twenty other titles, including Abraham de Brooklyn and John l'Enfer. He is currently Secretary General of the Académie Goncourt, has been Chairman of the Écrivains de Marine since 2007 and is a member of the Académie de Marine. He spent fourteen years on the writing of The Office of Gardens and Ponds.

Elizabeth Lowry

Elizabeth Lowry was born in Washington, DC and educated in South Africa and England. She lives and works in Oxford. Her first novel, The Bellini Madonna, was published in 2008 to great acclaim. She is a frequent contributor to the London Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, The Guardian and The Wall Street Journal.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Heather O'Neill

Heather O'Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist. Lullabies for Little Criminals, her debut novel, was published in 2007 to international critical acclaim and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her second novel, The Girl who was Saturday Night, was longlisted for the Baileys Women's Fiction Prize, and shortlisted for the Giller Prize, as was her collection of short stories, Daydreams of Angels. Her third novel, The Lonely Hearts Hotel was longlisted for the Baileys prize. Born and raised in Montreal, O'Neill lives there today with her daughter.

Ina Rilke

Ina Rilke is the prize-winning translator of books by Cees Nooteboom, W.F. Hermans, Tessa de Loo, Dai Sijie and Margriet de Moor.

James Heneage

James Heneage is the founder of the Ottakars chain of bookshops and the co-founder of the Chalke Valley History Festival. He has been fascinated by history, in particular Byzantine history, since a child. He now lives part of the year in the Peloponnese, where he has written much of his fiction to date. Otherwise he lives near Salisbury with his wife and family.

Jo Spain

Jo Spain has worked as a party advisor on the economy in the Irish parliament. Her first novel, With Our Blessing, was one of seven books shortlisted in the Richard and Judy Search for a Bestseller competition and her first psychological thriller. The Confession, was a number one bestseller in Ireland. Joanne lives in Dublin with her husband and their four young children.

Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Juan Gabriel Vásquez was born in Bogotá in 1973. His previous books include the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award winner and international bestseller The Sound of Things Falling, as well as The Informers, The Secret History of Costaguana and Reputations, which was awarded the Royal Spanish Academy Prize. He has translated works by Joseph Conrad, John Dos Passos and Victor Hugo, amongst others. His books have been translated in twenty-eight languages and forty countries. In 2016 he was made Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et de Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture. After sixteen years in France, Belgium and Spain, he now lives in Bogotá.