Related to: 'Destroying Angel'

Quercus

The Black Friar

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Rebellion in the city, and a Royalist spy in his own ranks - Damian Seeker, Captain of Oliver Cromwell's guard, must eradicate both in this twisty, action-packed historical thriller for fans of CJ Sansom, Rory Clements and The Three Musketeers. 'MacLean skilfully weaves together the disparate threads of her plot to create a gripping tale of crime and sedition in an unsettled city' Sunday TimesLondon, 1655, and Cromwell's regime is under threat from all sides. Damian Seeker, Captain of Cromwell's Guard, is all too aware of the danger facing Cromwell. Parliament resents his control of the Army while the Army resents his absolute power. In the east end of London, a group of religious fanatics plots rebellion. In the midst of all this, a stonemason uncovers a perfectly preserved body dressed in the robes of a Dominican friar, bricked up in a wall in the crumbling Black Friars. Ill-informed rumours and speculation abound, but Seeker instantly recognises the dead man. What he must discover is why he met such a hideous end, and what his connection was to the children who have started to disappear from around the city. Unravelling these mysteries is challenging enough, and made still harder by the activities of dissenters at home, Royalist plotters abroad and individuals who are not what they seem...

Quercus

The Seeker

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

The Devil's Recruit

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

Crucible

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

Crucible of Secrets

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean
Quercus

A Game of Sorrows

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Quercus

The Redemption of Alexander Seaton

S. G. MacLean
Authors:
S. G. MacLean

Banff, Scotland in the 1620s. A young man walks unsteadily through the streets. Is he just drunk or is there something more sinister happening? When he collapses in front of two sisters on that dark, wet night, the women guess that he's been poisoned. His body is discovered in the house of Alexander Seaton - a fallen minister, the discovery of whose clandestine love affair has left him disgraced. Why was the body in Seaton's house? And why would anyone want to murder this likeable young man? Seaton sets out to find answers, embarking on a journey not only through the darkest part of other men's souls, but also his own.

Andrea Maria Schenkel

Andrea Maria Schenkel lives with her family near Regensburg, in Bavaria, Germany. On publication in Germany, Tannöd won first place in the German Crime Prize as well as the Friedrich-Glauser Prize.

Andrew Caldecott

Andrew Caldecott is a QC specialising in media law; he has represented a wide variety of clients, from the BBC and the Guardian to supermodel Naomi Campbell. An occasional playwright, he turned his hand to fiction when, informed by his love of history, which he studied at New College, Oxford, he was seized by the notion of a city-state hiding a cataclysmic secret. Wyntertide continues the story started in Rotherweird.

Andrew Greig

Andrew Greig is the author of six books of poetry, two mountaineering books; two non-fiction books and six novels. He has been shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize, and won the Saltire and the Scottish Book of the Year awards. He lives in Orkney and Edinburgh with his wife, the novelist Lesley Glaister.

Antonin Varenne

Antonin Varenne was awarded the Prix Michel Lebrun and the Grand Prix du Jury Sang d'encre for Bed of Nails, his first novel to be translated into English. His second, Loser's Corner was awarded the Prix des Lecteurs Quais du polar - 20 minutes and the Prix du Meilleur Polar Francophone.

Cees Nooteboom

Cees Nooteboom was born in The Hague in 1933, and now lives in Amsterdam and on the island of Minorca. He is a poet, a novelist and a travel writer whose books include Rituals (1983), The Following Story (1994), Roads to Santiago (1997) and All Souls' Day (2001).

David Hair

David Hair, an award-winning writer of fantasy, has been inspired by his travels around the globe. He was born in New Zealand and after spending time in Britain and Europe, he moved to India for several years, which sparked both the Moontide Quartet and the Ravana series. He now lives in Bangkok, Thailand. His epic fantasy sagas The Moontide Quartet and The Sunsurge Quartet, and The Return of Ravana, his retelling of the Indian epic The Ramayana, are all published by Jo Fletcher Books.

Elias Khoury

Elias Khoury is the author of thirteen novels, four volumes of literary criticism and three plays. He was editor-in-chief of the cultural supplement of Beirut's daily newspaper, An-Nahar, and is Global Distinguished Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University.

Elizabeth Gill

Elizabeth Gill was born in Newcastle upon Tyne and as a child lived in Tow Law, a small mining town on the Durham fells. She has been a published author for more than thirty years and has written more than forty books. She lives in Durham City, likes the awful weather in the north east and writes best when rain is lashing the windows.

Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Henry Porter

Porter was a regualr columnist for the Observer and now writes about European power and politics for The Hive website in the US. He has written five bestselling thrillers, including Brandenburg, which won the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, and Empire State and The Dying Light, which were both nominated for the award. He is frequently described as the heir to John le Carré, and Firefly is a triumphant return to fiction from an author at the top of his game.

Jaan Kross

Jaan Kross is Estonia's best-known and most widely translated author. He was born in Tallinn in 1920 and lived much of his life under either Soviet or German occupation. He won countless awards for his writing, including The National Cultural Award, The Amnesty International Golden Flame and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. He died in 2007.

Laurie Graham

Laurie Graham is a former Daily Telegraph columnist and contributing editor of She magazine. The author of several acclaimed novels, most recently The Grand Duchess of Nowhere and The Night in Question (2015), Laurie lives in Dublin. Visit her website at www.lauriegraham.com

Marcello Fois

Marcello Fois was born in Sardinia in 1960 and is one of a gifted group of writers called 'Group 13', who explore the cultural roots of their various regions. He writes for the theatre, television and cinema, and is the author several novels, including The Advocate, Memory of the Abyss, Bloodlines and The Time in Between.