Related to: 'How to Die'

Quercus

When Death Takes Something From You Give It Back

Naja Marie Aidt
Authors:
Naja Marie Aidt

"I raise my glass to my eldest son. His pregnant wife and daughter are sleeping above us. Outside, the March evening is cold and clear. 'To life!' I say as the glasses clink with a delicate and pleasing sound. My mother says something to the dog. Then the phone rings. We don't answer it. Who could be calling so late on a Saturday evening?" In March 2015, Naja Marie Aidt's 25-year-old son, Carl, died in a tragic accident. When Death Takes Something From You Give It Back is about losing a child. It is about formulating a vocabulary to express the deepest kind of pain. And it's about finding a way to write about a reality invaded by grief, lessened by loss. Faced with the sudden emptiness of language, Naja finds solace in the anguish of Joan Didion, Nick Cave, C.S. Lewis, Mallarmé, Plato and other writers who have suffered the deadening impact of loss. Their torment suffuses with her own as Naja wrestles with words and contests their capacity to speak for the depths of her sorrow. This palimpsest of mourning enables Naja to turn over the pathetic, precious transience of existence and articulates her greatest fear: to forget. The insistent compulsion to reconstruct the harrowing aftermath of Carl's death keeps him painfully present, while fragmented memories, journal entries and poetry inch her closer to piecing Carl's life together. Intensely moving and quietly devastating, this is what is it to be a family, what it is to love and lose, and what it is to treasure life in spite of death's indomitable resolve.

MacLehose Press

Making Things Right

Ole Thorstensen
Authors:
Ole Thorstensen
Quercus

Not That Kind of Love

Clare Wise, Greg Wise
Authors:
Clare Wise, Greg Wise

'Inspirational... profoundly uplifting' Daily Mail'A remarkable account of illness, loss and the power of sibling love' The Times'Heartbreaking and inspiring in equal measure' Express'Wise's reflections on compassion fatigue are worth the price of this book alone, but what you take away is something splendid and unwearying: a sibling's devotion that feels remarkably like what we mean when we talk of a stage of grace.' Daily TelegraphA deeply moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living.Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Loveshould be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page.As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death.With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.'

Quercus

The Brain in Minutes

Rita Carter
Authors:
Rita Carter

The brain is considered the most complex structure in all of creation. But recent discoveries in neuroscience are now revealing the inner secrets of the brain - how it works, why it makes us who we are and what happens when it goes wrong. This cutting-edge and comprehensive guide explains why the human brain became so clever; how it controls everything from breathing, sleeping and seeing to identity, imagination, pleasure and pain; and what will happen when the brain integrates with computers or the latest genetic discoveries. Award-winning science writer Rita Carter also demystifies amnesia, multiple personalities, psychopathy, dreaming, hallucinations, addiction, autism, dyslexia, schizophrenia, dementia, and numerous other conditions of the mind.The Brain in Minutes covers: the origin and anatomy of the brain; control of the body; mood and emotions; perception; consciousness; memory and learning; personality; intelligence and other higher functions; language; strange states of the mind; malfunctions, disease and treatments; and the future of the brain. It also includes 200 high-tech scans, images and diagrams that detail and explain the structure and workings of the amazing human brain.

MacLehose Press

Zen and the Art of Murder

Oliver Bottini
Authors:
Oliver Bottini
riverrun

Histories

Sam Guglani
Authors:
Sam Guglani
Quercus

Maths 1001

Dr Richard Elwes
Authors:
Dr Richard Elwes

The ultimate smart reference to the world of mathematics - from quadratic equations and Pythagoras' Theorem to chaos theory and quantum computing.Maths 1001 provides clear and concise explanations of the most fascinating and fundamental mathematical concepts. Distilled into 1001 bite-sized mini-essays arranged thematically, this unique reference book moves steadily from the basics through to the most advanced of ideas, making it the ideal guide for novices and mathematics enthusiasts. Whether used as a handy reference, an informal self-study course or simply as a gratifying dip-in, this book offers - in one volume - a world of mathematical knowledge for the general reader. Maths 1001 is an incredibly comprehensive guide, spanning all of the key mathematical fields including Numbers, Geometry, Algebra, Analysis, Discrete Mathematics, Logic and the Philosophy of Maths, Applied Mathematics, Statistics and Probability and Puzzles and Mathematical Games. From zero and infinity to relativity and Godel's proof that maths is incomplete, Dr Richard Elwes explains the key concepts of mathematics in the simplest language with a minimum of jargon. Along the way he reveals mathematical secrets such as how to count to 1023 using just 10 fingers and how to make an unbreakable code, as well as answering such questions as: Are imaginary numbers real? How can something be both true and false? Why is it impossible to draw an accurate map of the world? And how do you get your head round the mind-bending Monty Hall problem? Extensive, enlightening and entertaining, this really is the only maths book anyone would ever need to buy.

Quercus

The Human Body in Minutes

Tom Jackson
Authors:
Tom Jackson

A concise and illuminating tour of the human body - learn about how our bodies work and why they work the way they do, in minutes. From the basic unit of the cell, through the tissues and organs that make up the body's systems, to how these systems work together to form a complete human being, this book takes you on a journey through our anatomy and its intricate workings - and looks beyond to explore human evolution, inheritence and genetics, human behaviour, disease, death and medicine and how technology will transform the body of the future.With 200 cutting-edge anatomical images, cross-sections and close-ups that detail and explain the brain, eye, heart, skin, skeleton, lung, kidney, ear, blood, liver, stomach, muscles, veins, arteries, DNA, chromosomes and all of the key features of our bodies, this is the perfect, easy reference to the anatomy, physiology and science of the human body.

riverrun

The Easy Way Out

Steven Amsterdam
Authors:
Steven Amsterdam

EVAN IS A SUICIDE ASSISTANT. HIS JOB IS LEGAL - JUST.'A poignant, sharply funny story that raises questions about life, death, and love' Louise O'Neill'You might just want to find and hug a nurse after finishing this thoughtful and ethically nuanced novel' GuardianEvan is the one at the hospital who hands out the last drink to those who ask for it. Evan's friends don't know what he does during the day. His mother, Viv, doesn't know what he's up to at night. And his supervisor suspects there may be trouble ahead. As he helps one patient after another die, Evan pushes against the limits of the law - and his own morality. And with Viv increasingly unwell, his love life complicated, to say the least, Evan begins to wonder who might be there for him, when the time comes.From an award-winning author, The Easy Way Out is a brilliantly funny and exquisitely sad novel that gets to the heart of one of the most difficult questions each of us may face: would you help someone die?

Quercus

50 Human Brain Ideas You Really Need to Know

Moheb Costandi
Authors:
Moheb Costandi

BJ Miller

Dr. BJ Miller, Jr. is a hospice and palliative care specialist. He is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at UCSF where he attends on the Symptom Management Service at UCSF's Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center, one of the first community-based palliative care programs in the country. He is also a long-time director of the Zen Hospice Project, a pioneering hospice organization in San Francisco. BJ is a native of Chicago. He studied art history as an undergraduate at Princeton University. He worked for several years for art and disability-rights nonprofit organizations before earning a medical degree at UCSF. He completed an internal medicine residency at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, where he was chief resident, and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Harvard Medical School, working at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In his work, he connects humanism and medicine in end-of-life and upstream palliative care.

Dr Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Okura Elwes is a writer, teacher, and researcher in mathematics and a Senior Teaching Fellow at University of Leeds, UK. He is the author of the books How to Build a Brain, The Maths Handbook, Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs, and Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes (all published by Quercus), and has written for New Scientist and Plus Magazine. His research interests include mathematical logic and random processes.

Greg Wise

Clare & Greg Wise were born and raised in the north of England.She read books, he fell out of trees.She excelled at school, he hid when the end-of-term Report came.She got a Double First in History at university. He did two Degrees - one where you spend your time drawing, the other where you pretend to be someone else.Oddly, as adults, they both found themselves in the film business: she at the UK Film Council and then Vice President of Universal Pictures, he pretending to be someone else.They lived in the same street until her death in 2016.

Moheb Costandi

Moheb Costandi is a molecular and developmental neurobiologist turned science writer. He writes for the Guardian and Scientific American, and is the author of the weblog Neurophilosophy. He is based in London.

Naja Marie Aidt

Originally from Greenland, Naja Marie Aidt is a Danish poet and author with nearly 20 works in various genres to her name. She is also a playwright and screenwriter and has published children's books and translated fiction and poetry from Swedish and Norwegian. She has received numerous honors, including the Danish Critics Choice Award, The Danish Art Foundation's Award for Lifelong Service, and the Nordic nations' most prestigious literary prize, the Nordic Council's Literature Prize, in 2008 for Baboon. Her work has been translated into eleven languages. Her work has also been anthologized in the Best European Fiction series and has appeared in leading American and International journals and magazines. Baboon was published in the States by Two Lines Press in 2014. Denise Newman won the PEN Translation Prize for her translation of Baboon in 2015. Naja Marie Aidt's first novel Rock, Paper, Scissors was published in August 2015 by Open Letter Books. She lives in Brooklyn.

Ole Thorstensen

Ole Thorstensen was born in Arendal, Norway, and makes his debut as an author with a story about work and identity and a tribute to manual labour. Thorstensen was raised on Tromøy, an island with five thousand inhabitants. He is a trained carpenter, and has worked for twenty-five years in the construction industry. He now lives in Eidsvoll, six miles north of Oslo.

Rita Carter

Rita Carter is a renowned science writer who has twice been awarded the Medical Journalists' Association prize for outstanding contributions to medical journalism. She is the author of Mapping the Mind and The People You Are and has been shortlisted for the Rhone-Poulenc Prize for Science Books. She is a frequent speaker on the topics of consciousness and behaviour at seminars and conferences worldwide.

Sam Guglani

Sam Guglani is a doctor and writer. He completed his Masters in Creative Writing at Oxford, his poems have won prizes and he writes for The Lancet. In 2009 he founded Medicine Unboxed, an event series bringing together medicine and the arts, which he directs and curates every year. He is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist in Cheltenham.

Steven Amsterdam

Steven Amsterdam is a writer and palliative care nurse. Originally from New York City, he now lives in Melbourne. His most recent novel about assisted suicide, The Easy Way Out, has enjoyed critical acclaim in both the UK and Australia, and has been long-listed for the Miles Franklin Literary Award. His first book Things We Didn't See Coming was long-listed for the Guardian First Book Award. His second book, What the Family Needed was longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.

Tom Jackson

Tom Jackson is a science writer who has, over the past 20 years, written more than 100 books and contributed to many more. His specialties are natural history, technology and the history of science. Tom studied zoology at Bristol University and has worked as a zookeeper and a conservationist. He is the author of Genetics in Minutes.