Related to: 'Maths 1001'

About Heron Books

Heron Books is an imprint of Quercus Books, focussed on publishing high-quality storytelling in both fiction and non-fiction.

Quercus

The Maths Handbook

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

This is the perfect introduction for those who have a lingering fear of maths. If you think that maths is difficult, confusing, dull or just plain scary, then The Maths Handbook is your ideal companion. Covering all the basics including fractions, equations, primes, squares and square roots, geometry and fractals, Dr Richard Elwes will lead you gently towards a greater understanding of this fascinating subject. Even apparently daunting concepts are explained simply, with the assistance of useful diagrams, and with a refreshing lack of jargon. So whether you're an adult or a student, whether you like Sudoku but hate doing sums, or whether you've always been daunted by numbers at work, school or in everyday life, you won't find a better way of overcoming your nervousness about numbers and learning to enjoy making the most of mathematics.

Quercus

Mathematics

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Mathematics in 100 Key Breakthroughs presents a series of essays explaining the fundamentals of the most exciting and important maths concepts you really need to know. Richard Elwes profiles the important, groundbreaking and front-of-mind discoveries that have had a profound influence on our way of life and understanding. From the origins of counting over 35,000 years ago, right up to breakthroughs such as Wiles' Proof of Fermat's Last Theorem and Cook & Wolfram's Rule 110, it tells a story of discovery, invention, gradual progress and inspired leaps of the imagination.

Quercus

Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Quercus

Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes
Quercus

How to Solve the Da Vinci Code

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Can you outrun a bullet? How do you build an electronic brain? Is it possible to create an unbreakable code? Could you slow down time? How do you unleash chaos? If you thought mathematics was all about measuring angles in a triangle or factorizing equations, think again ... How to Build a Brain and 34 Other Really Interesting Uses of Mathematics demystifies the astonishing world of maths in a series of intriguing, entertaining and often extraordinary scenarios - that explain key concepts in plain and simple language. You'll find out how to unknot your DNA, how to count like a supercomputer and how to become famous for solving mathematics most challenging problem. You'll learn essential survival skills such as how to survive in a whirlpool, how to slay a mathematical monster and how to be alive and dead at the same time. And along the way you'll discover some plain old cool stuff like how to unleash chaos, how to create an unbreakable code and how to use the mathematics to win at roulette or avoid going to prison. So if you want to get to grips with the great questions of number theory and geometry, the mysteries of the prime numbers or Plato's classification of regular polyhedra, or if you are really more interested in learning how to have beautiful children or how to make a million on the stock market, this is the perfect introduction to the fascinating world of modern mathematics.

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Alice Roberts

Alice Roberts is an anatomist, osteoarchaeologist, anthropologist, television presenter, author and professor at the University of Birmingham. She has presented The Incredible Human Journey and Coast on BBC 2, Inside Science on Radio 4 and appeared as an expert on Time Team on Channel 4. She lives in Bristol with her husband and two children.

BJ Miller

Dr. BJ Miller, Jr. is a hospice and palliative care specialist. He is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at UCSF where he attends on the Symptom Management Service at UCSF's Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Center, one of the first community-based palliative care programs in the country. He is also a long-time director of the Zen Hospice Project, a pioneering hospice organization in San Francisco. BJ is a native of Chicago. He studied art history as an undergraduate at Princeton University. He worked for several years for art and disability-rights nonprofit organizations before earning a medical degree at UCSF. He completed an internal medicine residency at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, where he was chief resident, and a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Harvard Medical School, working at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In his work, he connects humanism and medicine in end-of-life and upstream palliative care.

Cees Nooteboom

Cees Nooteboom was born in The Hague in 1933, and now lives in Amsterdam and on the island of Minorca. He is a poet, a novelist and a travel writer whose books include Rituals (1983), The Following Story (1994), Roads to Santiago (1997) and All Souls' Day (2001).

Craig Russell

Craig Russell is the author of the Jan Fabel thrillers set in contemporary Hamburg and the Lennox series set in 1950s Glasgow. He is the only non-German to have been awarded the Polizeistern (Police Star) by the Polizei Hamburg. He has been shortlisted for the CWA Duncan Lawrie Golden Dagger, the French Prix Polar, the 2012 Bloody Scotland Crime Book of the Year and the 2013 Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, and has won the CWA Dagger in the Library and the 2015 Bloody Scotland Crime Book of the Year

Gemma Lavender

Gemma Lavender is editor of All About Space magazine and writes for Astronomy Now and Physics World magazines. She has worked for Scientific Reports and the Institute of Physics and holds a Master of Physics.

Giles Sparrow

Giles Sparrow studied Astronomy at University College London, and works as an editor specializing in popular science. He is the author of - amongst other books - The Genius Test, The Universe and How To See It, The Stargazer's Handbook and Hubble: Window on the Universe and was a major contributor to Dorling Kindersley's Universe.

Hywel Williams

Hywel Williams is a renowned historian, newspaper columnist, political advisor and TV presenter. He is the author of the famous political exposé Guilty Men and the massive Cassell's Chronology of World History.

Ian Leslie

Ian Leslie lives in London, combining careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To Be President (Politicos, 2008), was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing, and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian and The Times.

Ian Stewart

Professor Ian Stewart is a world renowned populariser of mathematics. In 1995 he was awarded the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Medal for furthering the public understanding of science. He has been awarded the 1998 Communications Award of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics in the USA, the 2000 Gold Medal of the Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications, and the 2002 Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology.He is the author of over 20 popular science and mathematics titles including Does God Play Dice?, Nature's Numbers (shortlisted for the 1996 Rhone-Poulenc Prize), Life's Other Secret and Flatterland, which was in the top 20 Bestseller List in the USA.Professor Stewart is the mathematics consultant for New Scientist, and has been a consultant for Encyclopaedia Britannica. From 1990 to 2001 he wrote the 'Mathematical Recreations' column in Scientific American. He is an active research mathematician with over 160 published papers and is currently Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University where he is Director of the Mathematics Awareness Centre. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2001.

Johnny West

Johnny West was a Reuters correspondent in the Middle East; for a decade he has run a digital news agency in the area. He is an internet journalist and blogger. He has worked in Afghanistan, as well as Egypt, Tunisia and Iraq. He lives in Jordan. He speaks fluent Arabic, Farsi and French. He now works for the United Nations.

Julia Collins

Julia Collins has a PhD in 4-dimensional Knot Theory from the University of Edinburgh, where she spent five years as the Mathematics Engagement Officer, with a remit to lecture and spread an appreciation of mathematics. She is now Outreach Officer at the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute. Julia's writing has been published in Nature and in Princeton University Press' anthology The Best Writing on Mathematics. She is a winner of the How to Talk Maths in Public competition, has been nominated for the London Mathematical Society's Anne Bennett prize, and organised the world's first Maths Craft Festival.

Liam Fox

Liam Fox practised as an NHS doctor for ten years and is former Secretary of State for Defence. He is now the Member of Parliament for North Somerset. Rising Tides is his first book. He lives in Somerset.

Martin Walker

Martin Walker is a prize-winning journalist and the author of several acclaimed works of non-fiction, including The Cold War: A History. He lives in the Dordogne and Washington, DC.

Moheb Costandi

Moheb Costandi is a molecular and developmental neurobiologist turned science writer. He writes for the Guardian and Scientific American, and is the author of the weblog Neurophilosophy. He is based in London.