Related to: 'You Should Have Left'

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F

Daniel Kehlmann
Authors:
Daniel Kehlmann
riverrun

Fame

Daniel Kehlmann
Authors:
Daniel Kehlmann

Imagine being famous. Wouldn't that be great?'A real beauty of a book' - Jonathan Franzen'Riffs echo through this playful, perplexing landscape' - The Times But what if, one day, you got stuck in a country where no one spoke your language. Where no one knew your face and you had no way of contacting home. How would your fame help you then? What would happen if someone got hold of your mobile phone? If they spoke to your girlfriends, your agent, your director and started making decisions for you. And when no one believed that you were you any more, when you saw a lookalike acting your roles for you, what would you do? In this delightfully entertaining book, Daniel Kehlmann throws his characters into situations that are thrilling, funny, surprising and tragic, confirming his place as one of his generation's finest writers.

riverrun

Me and Kaminski

Daniel Kehlmann
Authors:
Daniel Kehlmann
riverrun

Measuring the World

Daniel Kehlmann
Authors:
Daniel Kehlmann

Alex Connor

Alex Connor is also known as Alexandra Connor and she has also written historical sagas. She is a motivational speaker and is regularly featured on television and BBC radio. She is also an artist, commissioned by the RSC among many others. She lives in Brighton.

Alison Littlewood

Alison Littlewood is the author of A Cold Season, published by Jo Fletcher Books. The novel was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club, where it was described as "perfect reading for a dark winter's night." Her most recent novel, The Hidden People, has recently been published to critical acclaim.Alison's short stories have been picked for Best British Horror 2015, The Best Horror of the Year and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. She also won the 2014 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction with her story The Dog's Home, published in The Spectral Book of Horror Stories.Alison lives with her partner Fergus in Yorkshire, England, in a house of creaking doors and crooked walls. You can talk to her on twitter @Ali__L, see her on Facebook and visit her at www.alisonlittlewood.co.uk.

Andrea Maria Schenkel

Andrea Maria Schenkel lives with her family near Regensburg, in Bavaria, Germany. On publication in Germany, Tannöd won first place in the German Crime Prize as well as the Friedrich-Glauser Prize.

D. A. Mishani

D. A. Mishani is a former editor of Israeli fiction and international crime literature, as well as a literary scholar specialising in the history of detective literature. He lives in Tel Aviv and writes full time.

David Lagercrantz

David Lagercrantz was born in 1962, and is an acclaimed author and journalist. In 2015 The Girl in the Spider's Web, his continuation of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy, became a worldwide bestseller, and it was announced that Lagercrantz would write two further novels in the series. He is also the author of the acclaimed and bestselling I am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and Fall of Man in Wilmslow.

Eduardo Mendoza

Eduardo Mendoza was born in Barcelona in 1943. He studied Law and worked as an U.N. interpreter in the United States for nine years. Prior to An Englishman in Madrid, his most acclaimed work was The City of Marvels. Nick Caistor's translations include The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vázquez Montalban and works by Eduardo Mendoza, Juan Marsé, Alan Pauls and Guillermo Orsi.

Holly Cave

Holly Cave was born in sunny Torquay in 1983. She received a BSc in Biology and an MSc in Science Communication from Imperial College London, after which she spent four years working at the Science Museum in London. After a career break to travel the world, Holly became a freelance writer and now writes about science and technology alongside her fiction. She lives in Bedford with her husband, baby son and dog. The Memory Chamber is her first novel with Quercus, although she wrote a number of unpublished works with her father on his typewriter in the 1990s.

Ida Simons

Ida Simons (1911-1960) was a writer and a pianist, whose successful career came to an end with the German invasion. She was deported to Westerbork and Theresienstadt, along with her family. After the war, she gave more concerts, and then began to write. A Foolish Virgin was first published in 1959, and was highly regarded at the time. Unfortunately, her work sank into oblivion after her untimely death, but since its rediscovery in 2014 it has been translated into twenty-two languages and published widely.

Isabelle Grey

Isabelle Grey is a television screenwriter whose credits include Jimmy McGovern's BAFTA award-winning Accused: Tina's Story as well as over thirty-five episodes of Midsomer Murders, Casualty, Rosemary and Thyme, The Bill and Wycliffe. She has also written non-fiction and been a magazine editor and freelance journalist. Isabelle's previous novels include two psychological thrillers, The Bad Mother and Out Of Sight as well as the first two books in the DI Grace Fisher series, Good Girls Don't Die, Shot Through the Heart and The Special Girls. Isabelle grew up in Manchester and now lives in north London.

Jaan Kross

Jaan Kross is Estonia's best-known and most widely translated author. He was born in Tallinn in 1920 and lived much of his life under either Soviet or German occupation. He won countless awards for his writing, including The National Cultural Award, The Amnesty International Golden Flame and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. He died in 2007.

Javier Cercas

Javier Cercas was born in 1962. He is a novelist, short-story writer and columnist, whose books include Soldiers of Salamis (which sold more than a million copies worldwide, won six literary awards in Spain and was filmed by David Trueba), The Tenant and The Motive, The Speed of Light and The Anatomy of a Moment. His books have been translated into more than twenty languages. He lives in Barcelona.

Jin Yong

Jin Yong is one of the world's bestselling writers, with more than 100 million of his works sold (not including unknown numbers of bootleg copies). He is beloved across China for his wuxia ("martial arts and chivalry) novels, which have given rise to film, television, comic book and video game adaptations. He was awarded an O.B.E. in 1981, and is one of two authors on the MacLehose list who have asteroids named in their honour (the other being Georges Perec).

Joël Dicker

Joël Dicker was born in Geneva in 1985, where he studied Law. The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair was nominated for the Prix Goncourt and won the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens. It has sold more than 3.6 million copies in 42 countries. The Baltimore Boys, at once a prequel and a sequel, has sold more than 750,000 in France.

Jón Kalman Stefánsson

Jón Kalman Stefánsson's novels have been nominated three times for the Nordic Council Prize for Literature and his novel Summer Light, and then Comes the Night received the Icelandic Prize for Literature in 2005. In 2011 he was awarded the prestigious P.O. Enquist Award. He is perhaps best known for his trilogy - Heaven and Hell, The Sorrow of Angels (longlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize) and The Heart of Man (winner of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize) - and for Fish Have No Feet (longlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017).

Joseph Farrell

Joseph Farrell is Emeritus Professor at the University of Strathclyde. His books include a cultural history of Sicily and biographies of Dario Fo and Leonardo Sciascia. He is also a renowned translator from the Italian, whose translations include works by Leonardo Sciascia, Vincenzo Consolo, Dario Fo and Valerio Varesi. He lives in Glasgow.

Mark Sullivan

Mark Sullivan is the New York Times bestselling author of several thrillers, and co-author with James Patterson of two other novels of suspense.