Related to: '100 Things They Don't Want You To Know'

Quercus

100 Things You Will Never Find

Daniel Smith
Authors:
Daniel Smith
Quercus

100 Things You Will Never Do

Daniel Smith
Authors:
Daniel Smith

Quercus

100 Places You Will Never Visit

Daniel Smith, Dan Smith
Authors:
Daniel Smith, Dan Smith

Alice Peterson

Alice Peterson's first book, A Will to Win - now republished as Another Alice - is her personal story of her tennis days (she was one of the top 10 juniors in the country), followed by her fight to beat Rheumatoid Arthritis. Since then she has written six novels, including Monday to Friday Man, the dog walking romantic comedy that knocked Fifty Shades of Grey off the top of the eBook chart. She lives in west London with her Lucas Terrier, Mr Darcy.

Brian Innes

Brian Innes was a publisher, critic and the author of numerous popular crime-related books including Bodies of Evidence, Profile of a Criminal Mind, Body in Question and Serial Killers.

Cees Nooteboom

Cees Nooteboom was born in The Hague in 1933, and now lives in Amsterdam and on the island of Minorca. He is a poet, a novelist and a travel writer whose books include Rituals (1983), The Following Story (1994), Roads to Santiago (1997) and All Souls' Day (2001).

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

David Hair

David Hair, an award-winning writer of fantasy, has been inspired by his travels around the globe. He was born in New Zealand and after spending time in Britain and Europe, he moved to India for several years, which sparked both the Moontide Quartet and the Ravana series. He now lives in Bangkok, Thailand. His epic fantasy sagas The Moontide Quartet and The Sunsurge Quartet, and The Return of Ravana, his retelling of the Indian epic The Ramayana, are all published by Jo Fletcher Books.

Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Hywel Williams

Hywel Williams is a renowned historian, newspaper columnist, political advisor and TV presenter. He is the author of the famous political exposé Guilty Men and the massive Cassell's Chronology of World History.

Iain Overton

Iain is a multi-award winning journalist and human rights campaigner, and has reported from over two dozen conflict zones worldwide. Today he runs the London based charity Action on Armed Violence (AOAV), but prior to that he worked for the BBC, ITN and the London-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism. He has written for the Guardian, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs and International Business Times, among others. He is the recipient of two Amnesty Media Awards, a BAFTA, and a Peabody Award, and holds two degrees from Cambridge University. As well as lecturing on human rights journalism at Birkbeck University, London, he speaks regularly at the United Nations and other international forums on the matter of suicide bombings. He oversees the only global monitor of explosive violence around the world.

Jane Housham

Jane Housham grew up in Richmond, Yorkshire and is proud of her North East heritage. She is the publisher at University of Hertfordshire Press and also reviews books for the Guardian.

Joe Gores

Joe Gores (1931--) was educated at Notre Dame University and Stanford University, served in the US Army, writing biographies of generals, and spent twelve years as a San Francisco private investigator. He is the author of the acclaimed DKA Files series and has written screenplays and television scripts. He has won three Edgar Allan Awards and Japan's Maltese Falcon Award.

John Bew

John Bew teaches History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King's College London. He was the winner of the 2015 Philip Leverhulme Prize for outstanding achievement in Politics and International Studies and previously held the Henry Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress in Washington DC. John is a contributing writer at the New Statesman and the author of five books, including the critically-acclaimed Realpolitik: A History and Castlereagh. He was born in Belfast, educated at Cambridge, and lives in Wimbledon, London.

Jonathan Black

Jonathan Black is the nom de plume of Mark Booth, who read Philosophy and Theology at Oriel College, Oxford and who has worked in publishing for over twenty years, publishing authors including Auberon Waugh, Derek Jarman, Chris Ryan, Katie Price, Peter Kay and Rod Liddle. He has also published many of the leading writers in the field of alternative history, including Baigent and Leigh, Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, Robert Temple, Knight and Lomas, David Ovason, Colin Wilson and David Rohl.

Kathryn Bonella

Kathryn Bonella lived in London for several years, freelancing for numerous English and American television programmes, magazines and newspapers. She returned to Australia in 2000 to work as a full-time TV producer. She moved to Bali in 2005 to research and write Schapelle Corby's bestselling autobiography, My Story. Subsequently she has written the international bestsellers Hotel K and Snowing in Bali.

Lars Mytting

Lars Mytting, a novelist and journalist, was born in Fåvang, Norway, in 1968. His novel Svøm med dem som drukner (published in English as The Sixteen Trees of the Somme) was awarded the Norwegian National Booksellers' Award and has been bought for film. Norwegian Wood has become an international bestseller, and was the Bookseller Industry Awards Non-Fiction Book of the Year 2016.

Massimo Ciancimino

Massimo Ciancimino was born in Palermo in 1963. He is the youngest son of Vito Ciancimino, and was barely eighteen when he was chosen by his father to be his aide and therefore initiated directly into the double life of the 'Mayor of the Corleones': a world that he was part of until his arrest on the 6th June 2006. Francesco La Licata is a journalist who has written for the Stampa since 1980. He recently collaborated with the national anti-mafia prosecutor, Pietro Grasso, to write Pizzini, veleni e cicoria: La mafia prima e dopo Provenzano (Feltrinelli 2008). N.S. Thompson is a poet, critic, and translator of Italian. Born in Manchester, he now lives and works in Oxford, UK, where he teaches literature at Christ Church.

Megan Crane

Megan Crane was born in Texas. After a number of years in graduate school at the University of York, she wrote her first novel, English as a Second Language. She now lives in Los Angeles with her partner and their numerous pets. She is hard at work on her next novel.

Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful true crime and popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.