Related to: 'How to Write a Letter'

Quercus

The Genius Test: Maths

Julia Collins
Authors:
Julia Collins

Can you explain Fermat's Last Theorem? What is the shape of the Universe? And how do you add up to infinity? Challenge yourself with The Genius Test: Maths and learn to think and talk like the world's greatest mathematical geniuses. Taking you on a journey through the mathematical ideas that underpin our world - from imaginary numbers and Turing machines to chaos theory and mathematical paradoxes; from the search for primes and game theory to relativity and the arithmetic of altruism - The Genius Test: Maths demystifies 50 key concepts and provides you with the tools to master the very biggest ideas. Includes: imaginary numbers; the riemann hypothesis; mathematical paradoxes; chaos theory; code breaking; Gödel's incompleteness theorem; topology; the Poincaré conjecture; game theory; the maths of symmetry; calculus; Turing machines; fractals; the prisoner's dilemma; primes; knot theory; probability and statistics; the Monty Hall problem . . . and many more.

Quercus

How to Make Children Laugh

Michael Rosen
Authors:
Michael Rosen

Belching, banana skins, being eaten and bear hunts make children laugh.As do practical jokes, peekaboo, pantomime and poetry that makes no sense.Why and how does this work? And why does it matter?Writer and Professor of Children's Literature Michael Rosen, whose books - from We're Going on a Bear Hunt to Chocolate Cake - have made millions of children rock with laughter, gives us the tools for this greatest of gifts.

Quercus

How to Count to Infinity

Marcus du Sautoy
Authors:
Marcus du Sautoy
Quercus

How To Understand E =mc²

Christophe Galfard
Authors:
Christophe Galfard

Do something amazing and learn a new skill thanks to the Little Ways to Live a Big Life books! The beginning of the 20th century heralded a scientific revolution: what a few brilliant minds uncovered about our reality in the first twenty years has shaped the history of our species. And one of them in particular stands out: Einstein, with his celebrated E=mc2.In this remarkable and insightful book, Christophe Galfard describes how E=mc2 is a direct consequence of the Theory of Special Relativity, the theory of how objects move and behave, at speeds close to the speed of light. He considers Einstein's legacy in the light of the 21st century, with fresh hindsight, and considers its impact on our vision of reality. The reader will discover that far from being just a formula, it is a brand new understanding of the nature of space and time.Some of the greatest scientific breakthroughs in the history of science have been made by geniuses who managed to merge and unite hitherto separated domains of knowledge. Galfard explores two unifications with Einstein's theories, and looks at the even bigger picture of how E=mc2 has changed our world, and what it entails for the future.Throughout, Galfard takes the reader on an extremely entertaining journey, using simple, jargon-free language to help the reader gain a deeper understanding of science. With humour and patience, he guides us through the world of particles, anti-matter and much more to bring us closer to an ultimate understanding of reality as we understand it today.

Quercus

How to Land a Plane

Mark Vanhoenacker
Authors:
Mark Vanhoenacker

THE DAILY MAIL BOOK OF THE YEAR'Illuminates the practical reality of piloting in a concise and useful manner' Times Literary SupplementDo something amazing and learn a new skill thanks to the Little Ways to Live a Big Life books! By the author of the acclaimed international bestseller Skyfaring, the Economist's 'Best book of the Year' and a New York Times 'Notable Book', and a BBC Radio 4 Book of the WeekSo, hello! Welcome! Honestly, you look surprisingly relaxed. That's great to see. Have a seat on the left side of the cockpit - that's the captain's seat. Yes, that's right, you're now the captain, and yes, that's the runway down there. Fasten your seatbelt, order yourself a cup of tea, and let's get cracking.Mark Vanhoenacker, the airline pilot who makes poetry out of the science of flight technology, hands over the controls. Walking and talking us through the nitty-gritty of an approach and touchdown, he builds our understanding of flight from the ground up (or rather from the sky down), offering a new perspective of one of the more challenging and rewarding tasks ever.

Quercus

How to Draw Anything

Quercus

Maths 1001

Dr Richard Elwes
Authors:
Dr Richard Elwes
Quercus

How to Play the Piano

James Rhodes
Authors:
James Rhodes
Quercus

How to Play the Piano

James Rhodes
Authors:
James Rhodes
Quercus

50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

Who invented zero? Why 60 seconds in a minute? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? And can a butterfly's wings really cause a storm on the far side of the world? In 50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know, Professor Tony Crilly explains in 50 clear and concise essays the mathematical concepts - ancient and modern, theoretical and practical, everyday and esoteric - that allow us to understand and shape the world around us. Packed with diagrams, examples and anecdotes, this book is the perfect overview of this often daunting but always essential subject. For once, mathematics couldn't be simpler. Contents include: Origins of mathematics, from Egyptian fractions to Roman numerals; Pi and primes, Fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio; What calculus, statistics and algebra can actually do; The very real uses of imaginary numbers; The Big Ideas of relativity, Chaos theory, Fractals, Genetics and hyperspace; The reasoning behind Sudoku and code cracking, Lotteries and gambling, Money management and compound interest; Solving of Fermat's last theorem and the million-dollar question of the Riemann hypothesis.

Quercus

50 Philosophy of Science Ideas You Really Need to Know

Gareth Southwell
Authors:
Gareth Southwell
Quercus

A Field Guide to the British

Sarah Lyall
Authors:
Sarah Lyall

Dr Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Okura Elwes is a writer, teacher, and researcher in mathematics and a Senior Teaching Fellow at University of Leeds, UK. He is the author of the books How to Build a Brain, The Maths Handbook, Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs, and Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes (all published by Quercus), and has written for New Scientist and Plus Magazine. His research interests include mathematical logic and random processes.

Gareth Southwell

Gareth Southwell is a freelance philosopher, author and illustrator, and the curator of philosophyonline.co.uk. He is the author of an ongoing series of introductory philosophy books, including A Beginner's Guide to Descartes' Meditations and A Beginner's Guide to Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. He lives in Swansea with his wife and children.

James Rhodes

James Rhodes was born in London in 1975. A keen piano player, at eighteen he was offered a scholarship at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, but went to Edinburgh University instead. James stopped playing the piano entirely and dropped out after a year. He ended up working in the City for five years. After a devastating mental breakdown that led him to be institutionalised, he took the piano up again. He is now a professional and applauded concert pianist, writer and TV presenter. His memoir, Instrumental, was published to great critical acclaim and became an international bestseller, as did his short book How To Play the Piano.

Julia Collins

Julia Collins has a PhD in 4-dimensional Knot Theory from the University of Edinburgh, where she spent five years as the Mathematics Engagement Officer, with a remit to lecture and spread an appreciation of mathematics. She is now Outreach Officer at the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute. Julia's writing has been published in Nature and in Princeton University Press' anthology The Best Writing on Mathematics. She is a winner of the How to Talk Maths in Public competition, has been nominated for the London Mathematical Society's Anne Bennett prize, and organised the world's first Maths Craft Festival.

Marcus du Sautoy

Marcus du Sautoy is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford where he holds the prestigious Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science and is a Fellow of New College.Du Sautoy has received a number of awards for his work including the London Mathematical Society's Berwick Prize for outstanding mathematical research and the Royal Society of London's Michael Faraday Prize for 'excellence in communicating science'. He has been awarded an OBE for his services to science and was recently elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.His mathematical research has covered a great many areas including group theory, number theory and model theory, but he has been equally successful in his promotion of mathematics to the general public. He has published a number of best-selling, non-academic books and appears regularly on television and radio.

Sarah Lyall

A longtime reporter for the New York Times, Sarah Lyall has been a correspondent in the London bureau since 1995, writing news articles and features. She lives in London with her husband and their two daughters.

Shaun Usher

Shaun Usher's obsession with old-fashioned correspondence began when he fell in love with his future wife, Karina, by letter in 2002. This ultimately led to the 2009 launch of Letters of Note, an online museum of "correspondence deserving of a wider audience" which to date has been visited more than 100 million times. Four years later, his website spawned a much-anticipated book of the same name, the first of three books "of note" to be crowdfunded with Unbound; it was published in 2013 to widespread acclaim, has since become an international bestseller, and inspired Letters Live, a star-studded live show in which these letters are brought to life on stage.Shaun lives in Manchester with Karina and their two sons

Tony Crilly

Tony Crilly is Reader in Mathematical Sciences at Middlesex University, having previously taught at the University of Michigan, the City University in Hong Kong, and the Open University. His principal research interest is the history of mathematics, and he has written and edited many works on fractals, chaos and computing. He is the author of the acclaimed biography of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley.