Related to: 'Basket of Deplorables'


The Italian Teacher

Tom Rachman
Tom Rachman

'Deft characterisation, buoyant wit and imaginative richness' Evening Standard'Masterful . . . slick, entertaining' Guardian 'Funny poignant, occassionally breathtaking' Financial TimesRome, 1955The artists are gathering together for a photograph. In one of Rome's historic villas, a party glitters with socialites and patrons. Bear Bavinsky, creator of vast, masculine, meaty canvases, is their god. He is at the centre of the picture. His wife, Natalie, edges out of the shot.From the side of the room watches little Pinch - their son. At five years old he loves Bear almost as much as he fears him. After Bear abandons their family, Pinch will still worship him, while Natalie faces her own wars with the art world. Trying to live up to his father's name - one of the twentieth century's fiercest and most controversial painters - Pinch never quite succeeds. Yet by the end of a career of twists and compromises, he enacts an unexpected rebellion that will leave forever his mark upon the Bear Bavinsky legacy.What makes an artist? In The Italian Teacher, Tom Rachman displays a nuanced understanding of art and its demons. Moreover, in Pinch he achieves a portrait of vulnerability and frustrated talent that - with his signature humour and humanity ­- challenges the very idea of greatness.


The Imperfectionists

Tom Rachman
Tom Rachman

Amy Hempel

Born in Chicago in 1951, now living in New York, Amy Hempel has published her acclaimed and prize winning short stories in magazines such as Harpers and Vanity Fair. She is the author of four volumes of short stories, collected here.

Anders Roslund

Award-winning journalist Anders Roslund and ex-criminal Börge Hellström are Sweden's most acclaimed fiction duo. Their unique ability to combine inside knowledge of the brutal reality of criminal life with searing social criticism in complex, intelligent plots has put them at the forefront of modern Scandinavian crime writing.

Andrey Kurkov

Born near Leningrad in 1961, Kurkov was a journalist, prison warder, cameraman and screenplay-writer before his novels took off. He received "hundreds of rejections" and was a pioneer of self-publishing, selling more than 75,000 copies of his books in a single year. His novel Death and the Penguin, his first in English translation, was an international bestseller, drawing acclaim from all quarters. He lives in Kiev with his English wife and their three children.

Ben Dupre

Ben Dupré read Classics at Exeter College, Oxford before pursuing a career in reference publishing. He was Children's Reference Publisher at Oxford University Press from 1992 until 2004 and, all told, has more than 20 years' experience of bringing complex and challenging concepts to the widest possible audience.

CC Gibbs

CC Gibbs was born and lives in the USA. She is the author of over 40 romance and erotica novels, including the recent bestsellers Knight's Mistress and Knight's Game. Many of her novels were originally published under the name Susan Johnson.

Heather O'Neill

Heather O'Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist. Lullabies for Little Criminals, her debut novel, was published in 2007 to international critical acclaim and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her second novel, The Girl who was Saturday Night, was longlisted for the Baileys Women's Fiction Prize, and shortlisted for the Giller Prize, as was her collection of short stories, Daydreams of Angels. Her third novel, The Lonely Hearts Hotel was longlisted for the Baileys prize. Born and raised in Montreal, O'Neill lives there today with her daughter.

Hideo Yokoyama

Hideo Yokoyama (Author)Born in 1957, Hideo Yokoyama worked for twelve years as an investigative reporter with a regional newspaper north of Tokyo, before becoming one of Japan's most acclaimed fiction writers. His exhaustive and relentless work ethic is known to mirror the intense and obsessive behaviour of his characters; and in January 2003 he was hospitalized following a heart attack brought about by working constantly for seventy-two hours. Six Four is his sixth novel, and his first to be published in the English language.Jonathan Lloyd-Davies (Translator)Jonathan Lloyd-Davies studied Japanese at Durham and Chinese at Oxford; he currently works as a translator of Japanese fiction. His translations include Edge by Koji Suzuki, with co-translator Camellia Nieh, the Demon Hunters trilogy by Baku Yumemakura, Gray Men by Tomotake Ishikawa, and Nan-Core by Mahokaru Numata. His translation of Edge received the Shirley Jackson award for best novel. Originally from Wales, he now resides in Tokyo.

Howard Lederer

Howard Lederer is a professional poker player. Known as 'The Professor' for his cool demeanour and analytical play, he holds two World Poker Tour titles and two World Series of Poker bracelets. He lives in Las Vegas. Otto Penzler is the founder of New York's Mysterious Bookshop and the Mysterious Press. He is the Editor of the annual Best American Mystery Stories, and compiled Pulp Fiction: The Crimefighters and Pulp Fiction: The Villains.

Joanna Kavenna

Joanna Kavenna is the author of The Ice Museum, Inglorious (which won the Orange Prize for New Writing), The Birth of Love, Come to the Edge and A Field Guide to Reality. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, Spectator, London Review of Books and New York Times and she has held writing fellowships at St Antony's College Oxford and St John's College Cambridge. In 2011 she was named as one of the Telegraph's 20 Writers Under 40 and in 2013 was listed as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. She lives in Oxfordshire.

Joël Dicker

Joël Dicker was born in Geneva in 1985, where he studied Law. The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair was nominated for the Prix Goncourt and won the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens. It has sold more than 3.6 million copies in 42 countries. The Baltimore Boys, at once a prequel and a sequel, has sold more than 750,000 in France.

John Ajvide Lindqvist

John Ajvide Lindqvist is a Swedish author, born in 1968. He grew up in Blackeberg, a suburb of Stockholm. He wanted to become something awful and fantastic. First he became a conjurer and came in second in the Nordic card trick championship. Then he was a stand-up comedian for twelve years, before writing Let the Right One In. That novel became a phenomenal international bestseller and was made into a film and a West End play, both called Let Me In. His books are published in twenty-nine countries worldwide.

Johnny West

Johnny West was a Reuters correspondent in the Middle East; for a decade he has run a digital news agency in the area. He is an internet journalist and blogger. He has worked in Afghanistan, as well as Egypt, Tunisia and Iraq. He lives in Jordan. He speaks fluent Arabic, Farsi and French. He now works for the United Nations.

Joseph Farrell

Joseph Farrell is Emeritus Professor at the University of Strathclyde. His books include a cultural history of Sicily and biographies of Dario Fo and Leonardo Sciascia. He is also a renowned translator from the Italian, whose translations include works by Leonardo Sciascia, Vincenzo Consolo, Dario Fo and Valerio Varesi. He lives in Glasgow.

Julian Baggini

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books including The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta), and most recently The Edge of Reason (Yale). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think-tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. His website is

Liam Fox

Liam Fox practised as an NHS doctor for ten years and is former Secretary of State for Defence. He is now the Member of Parliament for North Somerset. Rising Tides is his first book. He lives in Somerset.

Markus Heitz

Markus Heitz studied history and German language and literature at university before turning to writing. His debut novel Schatten über Ulldart (the first in a series of epic fantasy novels) won the Deutscher Phantastik Preis (German Fantasy Award) in 2003, and was followed by his bestselling Dwarves and the tie-in Aelfar series, which have made him one of Germany's - and Europe's - most successful fantasy authors. He currently lives in Zweibrücken, Germany.

Massimo Carlotto

Massimo Carlotto was born in Padova in 1956. At the age of 19 he was arrested on suspicion of murdering a female student, a crime for which he was only acquitted after eighteen years, eleven trials, one successful escape attempt and finally a Presidential Pardon. Gianrico Carofiglio was born in Bari in 1961. A former anti-Mafia judge, he is the author of eight novels, including The Past is a Foreign Country, for which he won the Premio Bancarella. Giancarlo De Cataldo is an Italian magistrate turned crime writer. He is the editor of Crimini, The Bitter Lemon book of Italian Crime Fiction.

Matthew Sperling

Matthew Sperling is a lecturer in English Literature at UCL. His fiction and poetry has been published in, among others, New Statesman, 3:AM, The Junket and Best British Short Stories 2015 edited by Nicholas Royle.