Related to: 'Basket of Deplorables'

riverrun

The Italian Teacher

Tom Rachman
Authors:
Tom Rachman
riverrun

The Imperfectionists

Tom Rachman
Authors:
Tom Rachman

Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts took a first in Modern History at Cambridge. He has been a professional historian since the publication of his life of Lord Halifax , The Holy Fox, in 1991, followed by Eminent Churchillians in 1994 . He contributes regularly to the Sunday Telegraph. Lives in Knightsbridge, London, and has two children. His Salisbury won the Wolfson History Prize in 2000. His books include Napoleon and Wellington in 2001, Hitler and Churchill (based on BBC-2 series) in 2003. What Might Have Been (editor) in 2004. His History of the English Speaking Peoples Since 1900 was published in 2006 and won the Walter Bagehot Prize .

Andrey Kurkov

Born near Leningrad in 1961, Kurkov was a journalist, prison warder, cameraman and screenplay-writer before his novels took off. He received "hundreds of rejections" and was a pioneer of self-publishing, selling more than 75,000 copies of his books in a single year. His novel Death and the Penguin, his first in English translation, was an international bestseller, drawing acclaim from all quarters. He lives in Kiev with his English wife and their three children.

Ben Dupre

Ben Dupré read Classics at Exeter College, Oxford before pursuing a career in reference publishing. He was Children's Reference Publisher at Oxford University Press from 1992 until 2004 and, all told, has more than 20 years' experience of bringing complex and challenging concepts to the widest possible audience.

Bernardo Atxaga

Bernardo Atxaga was born in Gipuzkoa in Spain in 1951 and lives in the Basque Country, writing in Basque and Spanish. He is a prizewinning novelist and poet, whose books, including Obabakoak (1992), The Accordionist's Son (2007) and most recently Seven Houses in France (2012), have won critical acclaim in Spain and abroad. His works have been translated into twenty-two languages.

CC Gibbs

CC Gibbs was born and lives in the USA. She is the author of over 40 romance and erotica novels, including the recent bestsellers Knight's Mistress and Knight's Game. Many of her novels were originally published under the name Susan Johnson.

Heather O'Neill

Heather O'Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist. Lullabies for Little Criminals, her debut novel, was published in 2007 to international critical acclaim and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her second novel, The Girl who was Saturday Night, was longlisted for the Baileys Women's Fiction Prize, and shortlisted for the Giller Prize, as was her collection of short stories, Daydreams of Angels. Her third novel, The Lonely Hearts Hotel was longlisted for the Baileys prize. Born and raised in Montreal, O'Neill lives there today with her daughter.

Jeanette Winterson

Jeanette Winterson's first novel, Oranges are Not the Only Fruit, won the Whitbread Prize for Best First Novel. Since then she has written eight other novels, including The Passion and been published in 32 countries, as well as adapting her work for TV, film and stage. She lives in Gloucestershire and London.

Jessica Moore

Jessica Moore is an author and translator. Her book of poems, Everything, now, is partly a conversation with her translation of Turkana Boy by Jean-François Beauchemin, for which she won a PEN America Translation Award. Jessica's translation of Birth of a Bridge by Maylis de Kerangal has received widespread praise. She lives in Montreal.

Jim Shepard

Jim Shepard is the National Book Award-finalist and highly acclaimed author of seven novels and five collections of stories, including The Book of Aron and Like You'd Understand, Anyway. He lives in Massachusetts with his family and teaches creative writing at the historic liberal arts establishment Williams College. Widely acclaimed as one of the US's finest writers, The World to Come is the first collection of his short stories to be published in the UK.

Joanna Kavenna

Joanna Kavenna is the author of The Ice Museum, Inglorious (which won the Orange Prize for New Writing), The Birth of Love, Come to the Edge and A Field Guide to Reality. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, Spectator, London Review of Books and New York Times and she has held writing fellowships at St Antony's College Oxford and St John's College Cambridge. In 2011 she was named as one of the Telegraph's 20 Writers Under 40 and in 2013 was listed as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. She lives in Oxfordshire.

Joël Dicker

Joël Dicker was born in Geneva in 1985, where he studied Law. The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair was nominated for the Prix Goncourt and won the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens. It has sold more than 3.6 million copies in 42 countries. The Baltimore Boys, at once a prequel and a sequel, has sold more than 750,000 in France.

Julian Baggini

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books including The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta), and most recently The Edge of Reason (Yale). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think-tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. His website is www.microphilosophy.net

Maylis de Kerangal

Maylis de Kerangal spent her childhood in Le Havre, France. Her novel, Birth of a Bridge, was the winner of the Prix Franz Hessel and Prix Médicis in 2010. Her novella Tangente vers l'est was the winner of the 2012 Prix Landerneau. In 2014, her fifth novel, Réparer les vivants, was published to wide acclaim, winning the Grand Prix RTL-Lire award and the student choice novel of the year from France Culture and Télèrama.

Prajwal Parajuly

Prajwal Parajuly - the son of an Indian father and a Nepalese mother - divides his time between New York and Oxford, England, but disappears to Gangtok, his hometown in the Indian Himalayas, at every opportunity. Parts of The Gurkha's Daughter: Stories were written while he was a writer-in-residence at Truman State University, in Kirksville, Missouri.

Stephen Coonts

Stephen Coonts is the author of fifteen New York Times bestsellers, which have been published in over 20 countries worldwide. A former Navy pilot and Vietnam combat veteran, he and his wife live in Nevada. Visit his Web site at www.coonts.com.

Timur Vermes

The son of a German mother and a Hungarian father who fled the country in 1956, Timur Vermes was born in Nuremberg in 1967. He studied history and politics and went on to become a journalist. He has written for the Abendzeitung and the Cologne Express and worked for various magazines. He has ghostwritten several books since 2007. This is his first novel. Jamie Bulloch's translations include Ruth Maier's Diary, Portrait of a Mother as a Young Women by F. C. Delius, and novels by Paulus Hochgatterer and Daniel Glattauer.

Tom Rachman

Born in London and raised in Vancouver, Tom Rachman was a foreign correspondent for the Associated Press stationed in Rome, then an editor at the International Herald Tribune in Paris. He is the author of two novels, the international bestseller The Imperfectionists; The Rise and Fall of Great Powers and a short stories collection Basket of Deplorables. He lives in London.

Trevor Hoyle

Trevor Hoyle was born in Lancashire, and started out as an actor before moving to the other side of the screen as a full-time writer. His award-winning short fiction and novels range from hard-edged thrillers to comedy to science fiction, including his most recent blockbuster, the eco-thriller The Last Gasp. He has also written for the radio (his first radio play, GIGO, won the Radio Times Drama Award) and TV, including the cult TV series Blake's 7; his bestselling novelisations include Blake's 7, which he co-wrote with Terry Nation, the show's creator, followed by Blake's 7: Project Avalon and Blake's 7: Scorpio Attack. His novel Rule of Night was a Time Out Book of the Week. He's also won the Transatlantic Review Erotic Fiction Award and the Ray Mort Northern Novel Award. After travelling the world, he returned to his roots, and once again lives in Lancashire.