Related to: 'Our Child of the Stars'

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Heron Books

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Beth Good

Beth Good is a Kindle All-Stars winner for top ebook sales. Born and raised in Essex, England, she was whisked away to an island tax haven at the age of eleven to attend an exclusive public school and rub shoulders with the rich and famous. Sadly, she never became rich or famous herself, so had to settle for infamy as a writer of dubious novels.Beth has been writing and publishing fiction since 1998. As Beth Good she writes romantic comedy and feel-good fiction with a high Cute Factor. She also writes psychological thrillers as Jane Holland, historical fiction as Victoria Lamb, and Tudor and Regency romance as Elizabeth Moss. Beth currently lives in the West Country where she spends a great deal of time thinking romantic thoughts while staring out of her window at sheep. (These two actions are unrelated.)You can find her most days on Twitter as @BethGoodWriter where she occasionally indulges in pointless banter about chocolate making and the Great British Bake Off.

Beth O'Leary

Beth studied English at university before going into children's publishing. She lives as close to the countryside as she can get while still being in reach of London, and wrote her first novel, The Flatshare, on her train journey to and from work. She is now writing novels full time, and if she's not at her desk, you'll usually find her curled up somewhere with a book, a cup of tea, and several woolly jumpers (whatever the weather).

Didier Decoin

Didier Decoin was twenty when he published his first book, Le Procès à l'amour. It was followed by some twenty other titles, including Abraham de Brooklyn and John l'Enfer. He is currently Secretary General of the Académie Goncourt, has been Chairman of the Écrivains de Marine since 2007 and is a member of the Académie de Marine. He spent fourteen years on the writing of The Office of Gardens and Ponds.

Eduardo Mendoza

Eduardo Mendoza was born in Barcelona in 1943. He studied Law and worked as an U.N. interpreter in the United States for nine years. Prior to An Englishman in Madrid, his most acclaimed work was The City of Marvels. Nick Caistor's translations include The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vázquez Montalban and works by Eduardo Mendoza, Juan Marsé, Alan Pauls and Guillermo Orsi.

Elias Khoury

Elias Khoury is the author of thirteen novels, four volumes of literary criticism and three plays. He was editor-in-chief of the cultural supplement of Beirut's daily newspaper, An-Nahar, and is Global Distinguished Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Eva Rice

Eva Rice has written three novels and one non-fiction book. She is married to a musician and has three children. She lives in London.

Georges Perec

Georges Perec, born 1936, decided to be a writer at around the age of eighteen, but had a day job as a librarian in a medical research laboratory for most of his adult life. He made his first impact in 1965 with a barely fictional portrait of his own generation, Things. Shortly after, he joined Oulipo, the experimental "workshop" for mathematics and literature founded by Raymond Queneau and Francois Le Lionnais, of which he became the most ardent and celebrated doyen. He is the author of A Void, a novel written without the letter "e", of the semi-autobiographical W or The Memory of Childhood, and, most famously, of Life A User's Manual, hailed by Italo Calvino as "the last real 'event' in the history of the novel so far". He lived in Paris, and died of lung cancer in 1982. Portrait of a Man, written in 1960, remained unpublished in French until 2012. publication.

Hideo Yokoyama

Hideo Yokoyama (Author)Born in 1957, Hideo Yokoyama worked for twelve years as an investigative reporter with a regional newspaper north of Tokyo, before becoming one of Japan's most acclaimed fiction writers. His exhaustive and relentless work ethic is known to mirror the intense and obsessive behaviour of his characters; and in January 2003 he was hospitalized following a heart attack brought about by working constantly for seventy-two hours. Six Four is his sixth novel, and his first to be published in the English language.Jonathan Lloyd-Davies (Translator)Jonathan Lloyd-Davies studied Japanese at Durham and Chinese at Oxford; he currently works as a translator of Japanese fiction. His translations include Edge by Koji Suzuki, with co-translator Camellia Nieh, the Demon Hunters trilogy by Baku Yumemakura, Gray Men by Tomotake Ishikawa, and Nan-Core by Mahokaru Numata. His translation of Edge received the Shirley Jackson award for best novel. Originally from Wales, he now resides in Tokyo.

Izzet Celasin

Izzet Celasin is a Turkish political refugee, imprisoned after the 1980 military coup and ultimately forced to emigrate to Norway in 1988. He wrote his first novel, Black Sky, Black Sea, in Norwegian, his adopted language. Charlotte Barslund is the translator of the Inspector Sejer novels by Karin Fossum and of novels by Per Peterson and Carsten Jensen.

Jaan Kross

Jaan Kross is Estonia's best-known and most widely translated author. He was born in Tallinn in 1920 and lived much of his life under either Soviet or German occupation. He won countless awards for his writing, including The National Cultural Award, The Amnesty International Golden Flame and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. He died in 2007.

Jakob Ejersbo

Jakob Ejersbo was born in Aalborg in 1968. He trained as a journalist, and his breakthrough came with the 2002 novel Northern Powers, which won the Golden Bay prize in 2003. He died in 2008 at the age of forty, after a ten-month battle with cancer. Mette Petersen lives in Kgs Lyngby in Denmark, where she works for a literary agency and as a translator. Previous translations include My Friend Jesus Christ by Lars Husum.

Jane Urquhart

Jane Urquhart is the author of six novels including Away (1993), The Stone Carvers (2001) and A Map of Glass (2005), as well as a collection of short fiction and four volumes of poetry. She has written a biography of L.M. Montgomery and is the editor of the Penguin Book of Canadian Short Stories. She lives in Ontario and spends part of the year in Ireland.

Javier Cercas

Javier Cercas was born in 1962. He is a novelist, short-story writer and columnist, whose books include Soldiers of Salamis (which sold more than a million copies worldwide, won six literary awards in Spain and was filmed by David Trueba), The Tenant and The Motive, The Speed of Light and The Anatomy of a Moment. His books have been translated into more than twenty languages. He lives in Barcelona.

Jeremy Chambers

Jeremy Chambers was born in 1974 and lives in Melbourne. His first novel, The Vintage and the Gleaning was inspired by summers spent working as a vineyard labourer whilst at school and university. It was conceived over the course of a long illness, during which he was overwhelmed by unusually vivid memories.

Jérôme Ferrari

Jerôme Ferrari was born in Paris in 1968. His first novel in English translation, Where I Left My Soul was the winner of the Prix du roman France Televisions, the Prix Initiales, the Prix Larbaud, and the Grand Prix Poncetton de la SGDL in its French edition. His second, The Sermon on the Fall of Rome, was the winner of the 2012 Prix Goncourt, confirming his status as one of France's outstanding young literary talents.

Jón Kalman Stefánsson

Jón Kalman Stefánsson's novels have been nominated three times for the Nordic Council Prize for Literature and his novel Summer Light, and then Comes the Night received the Icelandic Prize for Literature in 2005. In 2011 he was awarded the prestigious P.O. Enquist Award. He is perhaps best known for his trilogy - Heaven and Hell, The Sorrow of Angels (longlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize) and The Heart of Man (winner of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize) - and for Fish Have No Feet (longlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017).

Juan Marsé

Juan Marsé was born in 1933 in Barcelona. He is a Spanish novelist and screenwriter, and has won numerous awards for both his novels, most recently the 2008 Cervantes Prize.

Kari Hotakainen

Kari Hotakainen was born in 1957 in Pori, Finland. His breakthrough came in 1997 when he was nominated for the Finlandia Prize, which he later won in 2002. Hotakainen has also written children's plays, radio dramas, newspaper columns and television scripts. Owen T. Witesman is a translator from the Finnish and Estonian.