Related to: 'The Rival'

Agustín Martínez

Agustín Martínez was born in 1975 and studied Audiovisual Communications in Madrid. Today, he is one of Spain's most renowned screenwriters who has worked on some of the country's most popular crime series. On a holiday trip with his family to the Pyrenees he overheard the locals talking about the case of a missing child. The idea for Village of the Lost Girls, his first novel, was born and has been translated into many languages since.

Cate Woods

Cate Woods made the most of her degree in Anglo-Saxon Literature by embarking on a career making tea on programmes including The Big Breakfast, Who Wants to be a Millionaire and French & Saunders. After narrowly missing out on the chance to become a Channel 5 weather girl she moved into journalism, where she interviewed every famous John, from Prescott to Bon Jovi, ghostwrote a weekly column for a footballer's wife and enjoyed a brief stint as one half of Closer magazine's gossip-columnist duo, 'Mr & Mrs Showbiz'. Cate left the magazine world in 2009 to pursue a full-time career ghostwriting celebrity autobiographies and novels. She lives in London with her husband (not Mr Showbiz) and two small children. Just Haven't Met You Yet is her first novel under her own name.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Dany Laferrière

Dany Laferrière is a francophone Haitian and Canadian novelist and journalist. Born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and raised in Petit Goâve, Laferrière worked as a journalist in Haiti before moving to Canada in 1976. David Homel was born and raised in Chicago in 1952 of East European stock. He left at the end of the tumultuous 1960s and lived in Europe and Toronto before moving to Montreal in 1980.

David Hair

David Hair, an award-winning writer of fantasy, has been inspired by his travels around the globe. He was born in New Zealand and after spending time in Britain and Europe, he moved to India for several years, which sparked both the Moontide Quartet and the Ravana series. He now lives in Bangkok, Thailand. His epic fantasy sagas The Moontide Quartet and The Sunsurge Quartet, and The Return of Ravana, his retelling of the Indian epic The Ramayana, are all published by Jo Fletcher Books.

Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing before becoming a full-time writer. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the Library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Hester Browne

Hester Browne is the author of numerous bestselling novels including The Little Lady Agency in the Big Apple, The Finishing Touches and Swept Off Her Feet. She divides her time between London and Herefordshire.

Isabelle Grey

Isabelle Grey is a television screenwriter whose credits include Jimmy McGovern's BAFTA award-winning Accused: Tina's Story as well as over thirty-five episodes of Midsomer Murders, Casualty, Rosemary and Thyme, The Bill and Wycliffe. She has also written non-fiction and been a magazine editor and freelance journalist. Isabelle's previous novels include two psychological thrillers, The Bad Mother and Out Of Sight as well as the first two books in the DI Grace Fisher series, Good Girls Don't Die, Shot Through the Heart and The Special Girls. Isabelle grew up in Manchester and now lives in north London.

Jacqueline O'Mahony

Jacqueline O'Mahony is from, Cork, Ireland. She did her BA in Ireland, her MA at the University of Bologna, and her PhD in History as a Fulbright Scholar at Duke University, and at Boston College. She has worked as a writer, editor and stylist at Tatler, Vogue and the Irish Independent. She lives in Notting Hill with her husband and three young children.

Jim Shepard

Jim Shepard is the National Book Award-finalist and highly acclaimed author of seven novels and five collections of stories, including The Book of Aron and Like You'd Understand, Anyway. He lives in Massachusetts with his family and teaches creative writing at the historic liberal arts establishment Williams College. Widely acclaimed as one of the US's finest writers, The World to Come is the first collection of his short stories to be published in the UK.

Jin Yong

Jin Yong is one of the world's bestselling writers, with more than 100 million of his works sold (not including unknown numbers of bootleg copies). He is beloved across China for his wuxia ("martial arts and chivalry) novels, which have given rise to film, television, comic book and video game adaptations. He was awarded an O.B.E. in 1981, and is one of two authors on the MacLehose list who have asteroids named in their honour (the other being Georges Perec).

Magda Szabó

Magda Szabó was born in Debrecen, eastern Hungary, in 1917, and began her working life as a teacher. From 1949 onwards her work was banned, but she burst onto the literary scene in 1958 with the publication of Fresco and The Dawn. Katalin Street was published in 1969 and Abigail in 1970. In 1987, publication of The Door brought her international recognition and was the winner of the Prix Femina and the Mondello Prize. She died in 2007. In 2016 The Door was chosen as Best Book of the Year by the New York Times.

Maxim Februari

Maxim Februari studied Art History, Philosophy and Law. He was awarded a doctorate for a thesis on the clash of economics and ethics.The Literary Circle is her second novel. He has also published several collections of essays and has been writing a Saturday column for a Dutch newspaper since 1999.Paul Vincent taught Dutch at London University from 1967 to 1989 and since then has translated a wide variety of Dutch-language authors, including Louis Couperus, Willem Elsschot and Harry Mulisch.

Natasha Carthew

Natasha Carthew has been published previously as a poet and young adult writer and her books have been nominated for the Carnegie Award and shortlisted for several national awards including the Branford Boase. She lives in Cornwall with her girlfriend of twenty years and spends most of her time writing outdoors in all weathers. Her identity as a country writer has led her to become a survival expert, a trained walking-guide and to teach Wild Writing workshops.

Nigel McCrery

Nigel McCrery worked as a policeman, until he left the force to become an undergraduate at Cambridge University. He has created and written some of the most successful television series of the last ten years - his credits include Silent Witness, Born & Bred, New Tricks, All the King's Men and Back-Up. He is also the author of five internationally bestselling Sam Ryan mysteries. Nigel lives in London.

Peter May

Peter May was born and raised in Scotland. He was an award-winning journalist at the age of twenty-one and a published novelist at twenty-six. When his first book was adapted as a major drama series for the BCC, he quit journalism and during the high-octane fifteen years that followed, became one of Scotland's most successful television dramatists. He created three prime-time drama series, presided over two of the highest-rated serials in his homeland as script editor and producer, and worked on more than 1,000 episodes of ratings-topping drama before deciding to leave television to return to his first love, writing novels.He has won several literature awards in France, received the USA's Barry Award for The Blackhouse, the first in his internationally bestselling Lewis Trilogy; and in 2014 was awarded the ITV Specsavers Crime Thriller Book Club Best Read of the Year award for Entry Island. Peter now lives in South-West France with his wife, writer Janice Hally.

Philip Kerr

Philip Kerr has written over thirty books of which the best-known are the internationally renowned and bestselling Bernie Gunther series. The sixth book in the series, If the Dead Rise Not, won the CWA Historical Dagger. His other works include several standalone thrillers, non-fiction and an acclaimed series for younger readers, The Children of the Lamp. Philip died in March 2018, days before the publication of his 13th Bernie Gunther thriller, Greeks Bearing Gifts. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature shortly before his death.

Roland Schimmelpfennig

Roland Schimmelpfennig, born in 1967, is Germany's most celebrated contemporary playwright. He began his career as a journalist before studying to be a theatre director, and his plays have now been performed in more than forty countries. Schimmelpfennig is the recipient of the highest Playwriting Award in Germany, the Else-Lasker-Schüler-Prize, to honor his entire Oeuvre. One Clear, Ice-cold January Morning at the Beginning of the 21st Century is his first novel, shortlisted for the Leipzig Bookfair Prize in 2016. His play Winter Solstice is on tour across the U.K. in 2018. He lives in Berlin.

Rosanna Ley

Rosanna Ley works as a creative tutor and has written many articles and stories for national magazines. Her writing holidays and retreats take place in stunning locations in Spain and Italy. When she is not travelling, Rosanna lives in West Dorset by the sea.