Related to: 'On Sheep'

Adélaïde Bon

Adélaïde Bon is a French writer, actress and voice artist. She is graduate of the École Supérieure d'Art Dramatique in Paris, and she has acted in state theatres and for television, and devised and performed in numerous shows in factories, trains, museums, and conferences. In parallel, she completed five years of training on issues of gender equality under the auspices of a feminist company partnered with the European Association Against Violence Against Women and the Mémoire Traumatique association led by Dr Muriel Salmona. She lives in Paris, is married and has a son, and is part of a blended family. The Little Girl on the Ice Floe is her first book, published in France in March 2018.

Andrew Greig

Andrew Greig is the author of six books of poetry, two mountaineering books; two non-fiction books and six novels. He has been shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize, and won the Saltire and the Scottish Book of the Year awards. He lives in Orkney and Edinburgh with his wife, the novelist Lesley Glaister.

Axel Lindén

Axel Lindén was born in 1972. He lives with his family at their farm in Östergötland county in the southeast of Sweden. On Sheep is his debut.

Cees Nooteboom

Cees Nooteboom was born in The Hague in 1933, and now lives in Amsterdam and on the island of Minorca. He is a poet, a novelist and a travel writer whose books include Rituals (1983), The Following Story (1994), Roads to Santiago (1997) and All Souls' Day (2001).

Chil Rajchman

Chil Rajchman was born in Lodz in Poland, and was an active member of his Jewish community. After the Treblinka trials he emigrated to Uruguay, where he died in 2004. Solon Beinfeld taught Modern European and Jewish History at Washington University in St. Louis and he has written and consulted extensively on the Holocaust. He is currently editing a new Yiddish-English dictionary.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Dani Rabaiotti

Dani Rabaiotti is a PhD candidate and zoologist who studies African wild dogs and climate change at London Zoo.

David Lagercrantz

David Lagercrantz was born in 1962, and is an acclaimed author and journalist. In 2015 The Girl in the Spider's Web, his continuation of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy, became a worldwide bestseller, and it was announced that Lagercrantz would write two further novels in the series. He is also the author of the acclaimed and bestselling I am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, and Fall of Man in Wilmslow.

Elizabeth Hay

Elizabeth Hay is the bestselling, award-winning author of Late Nights on Air, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her other works include A Student of Weather (finalist for the Giller Prize and the Ottawa Book Award), Garbo Laughs (winner of the Ottawa Book Award and a finalist for the Governor General's Award), and Small Change (stories). In 2002, she received the prestigious Marian Engel Award. Elizabeth Hay lives and writes in Ottawa.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Francine Jay

Francine Jay is the bestselling decluttering expert and founder of MissMinimalist.com. She has helped hundreds of thousands of people organize their homes and simplify their lives, and has been prominently featured in international media, including the New York Times, BBC , the Guardian, CNN, the Financial Times and the Huffington Post. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and daughter. She is the author of the international bestseller The Joy of Less.

Georgia Toffolo

Georgia Toffolo, 23, from Torquay, has been on Made in Chelsea since series 7 and was named Queen of the Jungle for I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here! She now lives in Chelsea.

Ingrid Carlberg

Ingrid Carlberg is a Swedish author and journalist. Her book about the life and destiny of Raoul Wallenberg was awarded the August Prize for best work of non-fiction 2012. Her biography was also awarded the Swedish Academy's Axel Hirsch Prize in 2013. Ingrid Carlberg worked at the Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter from 1990 to 2010, specializing in investigative and narrative journalism. She has a honorary doctorate at Uppsala University, awarded for her book The Pill, 2008. This historical narrative about the history of antidepressants also recieved the Swedish journalistic prize Guldspaden 2008, for best work of investigative journalism. Between 2012 and 2013, Carlberg was a guest professor in journalism at the University of Gothenburg.

Jón Kalman Stefánsson

Jón Kalman Stefánsson's novels have been nominated three times for the Nordic Council Prize for Literature and his novel Summer Light, and then Comes the Night received the Icelandic Prize for Literature in 2005. In 2011 he was awarded the prestigious P.O. Enquist Award. He is perhaps best known for his trilogy - Heaven and Hell, The Sorrow of Angels (longlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize) and The Heart of Man (winner of the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize) - and for Fish Have No Feet (longlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017).

Ken Mogi

Ken Mogi is a neuroscientist, writer and broadcaster based in Tokyo. He has published more than 30 papers on cognitive and neurosciences, and over 100 books in Japan covering popular science, essay, criticism and self-help. His books have sold close to 1 million copies.

Lalage Snow

Award winning photographer, filmmaker and writer Lalage Snow has covered conflict and unrest since 2007 after finishing a Masters degree with Distinction in photojournalism at London College of Communication. Her personal projects have been published and exhibited to critical acclaim around the world and have been featured on the Channel 4, BBC, CNN and Al Jazeera. She has also given a number of public talks at literary festivals, museums and academic institutions including MIT. A series of short films made in Afghanistan are currently on display at the Smithsonian, the worlds largest museum complex.

Leah Weiss

Leah Weiss, Ph.D is a researcher, lecturer, consultant, and author of How We Work. Prof Wesiss teaches Compassionate Leadership at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where she created the perennially waitlisted course, Leading with Mindfulness and Compassion. She is a principal teacher and a founding faculty member of Stanford's Compassion Cultivation Program, conceived by the Dalai Lama.

Nick Caruso

Nick Caruso is a PhD student and salamander expert at the University of Alabama.

Per Olov Enquist

Per Olov Enquist was born in 1934 in a small village in Norrland, the northern part of Sweden. He is one of Sweden's leading contemporary writers, both as a novelist and a playwright. He has twice won the August Prize for fiction, the most prestigious Swedish literary prize, and was awarded the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for The Visit of the Royal Physician.

Philippe Claudel

Philippe Claudel is a university lecturer, novelist, film director and scriptwriter. He has written 14 novels that have been translated into various languages. He was born in Dombasle-sur-Meurthe in 1962 where he still lives. In 2009 his film I've Loved You So Long (Il y a longtemps que je t'aime), which draws upon Claudel's eleven years teaching in prisons, won the BAFTA for Best Foreign Language film. Among his novels, Grey Souls won the Prix Renaudot in France, the American Gumshoe Award and the Swedish Martin Beck award. Brodeck's Report won the 2010 Independent Foreign Fiction Award.