Related to: 'The Tour According to G'

Quercus

The World of Cycling According to G

Geraint Thomas
Authors:
Geraint Thomas

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Adélaïde Bon

Adélaïde Bon is a French writer, actress and voice artist. She is graduate of the École Supérieure d'Art Dramatique in Paris, and she has acted in state theatres and for television, and devised and performed in numerous shows in factories, trains, museums, and conferences. In parallel, she completed five years of training on issues of gender equality under the auspices of a feminist company partnered with the European Association Against Violence Against Women and the Mémoire Traumatique association led by Dr Muriel Salmona. She lives in Paris, is married and has a son, and is part of a blended family. The Little Girl on the Ice Floe is her first book, published in France in March 2018.

Andrew Greig

Andrew Greig is the author of six books of poetry, two mountaineering books; two non-fiction books and six novels. He has been shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize, and won the Saltire and the Scottish Book of the Year awards. He lives in Orkney and Edinburgh with his wife, the novelist Lesley Glaister.

Anthea Bell

Anthea Bell

Antonin Varenne

Antonin Varenne was awarded the Prix Michel Lebrun and the Grand Prix du Jury Sang d'encre for Bed of Nails, his first novel to be translated into English. His second, Loser's Corner was awarded the Prix des Lecteurs Quais du polar - 20 minutes and the Prix du Meilleur Polar Francophone.

Barbara Constantine

Barbara Constantine was born in Nice, France in 1955. She is scriptwriter and ceramacist as well as a novelist. Justin Phipps is a British translator who translates from French and Russian into English. After studying modern languages and social anthropology, he has worked in overseas development and more recently as a solicitor specialising in employment law.

Chil Rajchman

Chil Rajchman was born in Lodz in Poland, and was an active member of his Jewish community. After the Treblinka trials he emigrated to Uruguay, where he died in 2004. Solon Beinfeld taught Modern European and Jewish History at Washington University in St. Louis and he has written and consulted extensively on the Holocaust. He is currently editing a new Yiddish-English dictionary.

Diana Souhami

Diana Souhami is the author of many widely acclaimed books, and she has also written plays for radio and television. She won the Whitbread Biography Award for Selkirk's Island, her biography of Alexander Selkirk, or as he is better known, Robinson Crusoe.

Elizabeth Hay

Elizabeth Hay is the bestselling, award-winning author of Late Nights on Air, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize. Her other works include A Student of Weather (finalist for the Giller Prize and the Ottawa Book Award), Garbo Laughs (winner of the Ottawa Book Award and a finalist for the Governor General's Award), and Small Change (stories). In 2002, she received the prestigious Marian Engel Award. Elizabeth Hay lives and writes in Ottawa.

Georges Perec

Georges Perec, born 1936, decided to be a writer at around the age of eighteen, but had a day job as a librarian in a medical research laboratory for most of his adult life. He made his first impact in 1965 with a barely fictional portrait of his own generation, Things. Shortly after, he joined Oulipo, the experimental "workshop" for mathematics and literature founded by Raymond Queneau and Francois Le Lionnais, of which he became the most ardent and celebrated doyen. He is the author of A Void, a novel written without the letter "e", of the semi-autobiographical W or The Memory of Childhood, and, most famously, of Life A User's Manual, hailed by Italo Calvino as "the last real 'event' in the history of the novel so far". He lived in Paris, and died of lung cancer in 1982. Portrait of a Man, written in 1960, remained unpublished in French until 2012. publication.

Geraint Thomas

Geraint Thomas MBE is the winner of the 2018 Tour de France, a double Olympic gold medallist and multiple world champion who has been an indispensable part of Team Sky since its inception. A Tour de France veteran, he had both completed the entire race with a fractured pelvis and been essential in piloting Chris Froome to the yellow jersey multiple times before his own win. One of the most popular men in the peloton, he has watched and contributed from the inside as British cycling has been transformed over the past decade. In 2014 he won Commonwealth road race gold in Glasgow and was voted BBC Wales Sports Personality of the Year. In 2015 he became the first British rider to win the E3 Harelbeke: in 2016 he won Paris-Nice and in early 2018 won the Criterium du Dauphine.

Hilary Boyd

Hilary Boyd trained as a nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital, then as a marriage guidance counselor. After a degree in English Literature at London University in her thirties, she moved into health journalism, writing a Mind, Body, Spirit column for the Daily Express. She published six non-fiction books on health-related subjects before turning to fiction and writing a string of bestsellers, starting with Thursdays in the Park. Hilary is married to film director/producer Don Boyd and lives near Chichester, West Sussex.

Jonny Owen

Writer and filmmaker Jonny Owen is the producer and director of Bafta-winning SVENGALI as well as 2015's much-lauded I BELIEVE IN MIRACLES (Baby Cow), and co-author of the accompanying bestselling book. In THE THREE KINGS, Jonny is collaborating for the first time with On the Corner Productions. On the Corner are the multi-Bafta and Academy-Award winning producers of AMY and SENNA.

Karim Miské

Born in 1964 in Abidjan to a Mauritanian father and a French mother, Karim Miské grew up in Paris before leaving to study journalism in Dakar. He now lives in France, and is making documentary films on a wide range of subjects including deafness, for which he learned sign language, and the common roots between the Jewish and Islamic religions. Arab Jazz is the author's first novel.

Leo Moynihan

Leo Moynihan has been a sportstwiter for almost twenty years, and has written for FourFourTwo, the Sunday Telegraph, The Times and Esquire.

Mark Polizzotti

MARK POLIZZOTTI is the translator of more than thirty books from the French, including works by Gustave Flaubert, Marguerite Duras, Jean Echenoz, and Maurice Roche. His articles and reviews have appeared in The Wall Street Journal and The Nation. He is Publisher and Editor-in-Chief at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Martin Walker

Martin Walker is a prize-winning journalist and the author of several acclaimed works of non-fiction, including The Cold War: A History. He lives in the Dordogne and Washington, DC.

Oliver Kay

Oliver Kay is Chief Football Correspondent for The Times.

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano was born in Paris, France in 1945. He was the recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. He previously won the 2012 Austrian State Prize for European Literature, the 2010 Prix mondial Cino Del Duca from the Institut de France for lifetime achievement, the 1978 Prix Goncourt for Rue des boutiques obscures, and the 1972 Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française for Les Boulevards de ceinture.