Related to: 'Maths 1001'

About Heron Books

Heron Books is an imprint of Quercus Books, focussed on publishing high-quality storytelling in both fiction and non-fiction.

Quercus

50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

Who invented zero? Why 60 seconds in a minute? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? And can a butterfly's wings really cause a storm on the far side of the world? In 50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know, Professor Tony Crilly explains in 50 clear and concise essays the mathematical concepts - ancient and modern, theoretical and practical, everyday and esoteric - that allow us to understand and shape the world around us. Packed with diagrams, examples and anecdotes, this book is the perfect overview of this often daunting but always essential subject. For once, mathematics couldn't be simpler. Contents include: Origins of mathematics, from Egyptian fractions to Roman numerals; Pi and primes, Fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio; What calculus, statistics and algebra can actually do; The very real uses of imaginary numbers; The Big Ideas of relativity, Chaos theory, Fractals, Genetics and hyperspace; The reasoning behind Sudoku and code cracking, Lotteries and gambling, Money management and compound interest; Solving of Fermat's last theorem and the million-dollar question of the Riemann hypothesis.

Quercus

Mathematics

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Mathematics in 100 Key Breakthroughs presents a series of essays explaining the fundamentals of the most exciting and important maths concepts you really need to know. Richard Elwes profiles the important, groundbreaking and front-of-mind discoveries that have had a profound influence on our way of life and understanding. From the origins of counting over 35,000 years ago, right up to breakthroughs such as Wiles' Proof of Fermat's Last Theorem and Cook & Wolfram's Rule 110, it tells a story of discovery, invention, gradual progress and inspired leaps of the imagination.

Quercus

Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Quercus

Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

What can we learn from fish in a pond? How do social networks connect the world? How can artificial intelligences learn? Why would life be different in a mirror universe? Mathematics is everywhere, whether we are aware of it or not. Exploring the subject through 35 of its often odd and unexpected applications, this book provides an insight into the 'hidden wiring' that governs our world. From the astonishing theorems that control computers to the formulae behind stocks and shares, and from the foundations of the internet to the maths behind medical imaging, Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes explains how mathematics determines every aspect of our lives - right down to the foundations of our bodies.

Quercus

How to Solve the Da Vinci Code

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Can you outrun a bullet? How do you build an electronic brain? Is it possible to create an unbreakable code? Could you slow down time? How do you unleash chaos? If you thought mathematics was all about measuring angles in a triangle or factorizing equations, think again ... How to Build a Brain and 34 Other Really Interesting Uses of Mathematics demystifies the astonishing world of maths in a series of intriguing, entertaining and often extraordinary scenarios - that explain key concepts in plain and simple language. You'll find out how to unknot your DNA, how to count like a supercomputer and how to become famous for solving mathematics most challenging problem. You'll learn essential survival skills such as how to survive in a whirlpool, how to slay a mathematical monster and how to be alive and dead at the same time. And along the way you'll discover some plain old cool stuff like how to unleash chaos, how to create an unbreakable code and how to use the mathematics to win at roulette or avoid going to prison. So if you want to get to grips with the great questions of number theory and geometry, the mysteries of the prime numbers or Plato's classification of regular polyhedra, or if you are really more interested in learning how to have beautiful children or how to make a million on the stock market, this is the perfect introduction to the fascinating world of modern mathematics.

Quercus

The Maths Handbook

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

This is the perfect introduction for those who have a lingering fear of maths. If you think that maths is difficult, confusing, dull or just plain scary, then The Maths Handbook is your ideal companion. Covering all the basics including fractions, equations, primes, squares and square roots, geometry and fractals, Dr Richard Elwes will lead you gently towards a greater understanding of this fascinating subject. Even apparently daunting concepts are explained simply, with the assistance of useful diagrams, and with a refreshing lack of jargon.So whether you're an adult or a student, whether you like Sudoku but hate doing sums, or whether you've always been daunted by numbers at work, school or in everyday life, you won't find a better way of overcoming your nervousness about numbers and learning to enjoy making the most of mathematics.

Quercus

The Big Questions: Mathematics

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

The Big Questions series is designed to let renowned experts address the 20 most fundamental and frequently asked questions of a major branch of science or philosophy. Each 3000-word essay simply and concisely examines a question that has eternally perplexed enquiring minds, and provides answers from history's great thinkers. This ambitious project is a unique distillation of humanity's best ideas. In Big Questions: Mathematics, Tony Crilly answers the 20 key questions: What is maths for? Where do numbers come from? Why are primes the atoms of maths? What are the strangest numbers? Are imaginary numbers real? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? What is the maths of the universe? Are statistics lies? Can maths guarantee riches? Is there a formula for everything? Why are three dimensions not enough? Can a butterfly's wings really cause a hurricane? Can we create an unbreakable code? Is maths beauty? Can maths predict the future? What shape is the universe? What is symmetry? Is maths true? Is there anything left to solve?

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Alice Roberts

Alice Roberts is an anatomist, osteoarchaeologist, anthropologist, television presenter, author and professor at the University of Birmingham. She has presented The Incredible Human Journey and Coast on BBC 2, Inside Science on Radio 4 and appeared as an expert on Time Team on Channel 4. She lives in Bristol with her husband and two children.

Andreas Campomar

Andreas Campomar is a publishing director, and has reviewed for, among others, the Daily Telegraph, Times Literary Supplement and the Spectator. He is the great-grand-nephew of Dr Enrique Buero, the man who convinced Jules Rimet to stage the first World Cup in Montevideo and later became Vice-president of FIFA.

Christophe Galfard

Christophe Galfard has studied Advanced Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge University, England, where he did his Ph.D. on Black holes and the Origin of our Universe under the supervision of renowned Professor Stephen Hawking. Praised for his ability to explain difficult ideas with simple words, Christophe has been, for the past few years, devoting his time to spreading scientific knowledge to the general public. He has given public talks in front of more than 200,000 people, children and adults alike, throughout the world. He is a regular guest on TV and radio shows in France, where he is one of the most acclaimed popular science writer and speaker. Christophe has written many award-winning popular science books for children about the Solar System and our Earth's Climate before writing The Universe in Your Hand, his first book for adults, now an international best-seller translated into 16 languages.

Dr Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Okura Elwes is a writer, teacher, and researcher in mathematics and a Senior Teaching Fellow at University of Leeds, UK. He is the author of the books How to Build a Brain, The Maths Handbook, Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs, and Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes (all published by Quercus), and has written for New Scientist and Plus Magazine. His research interests include mathematical logic and random processes.

Gail Dixon

GAIL DIXON is a journalist and editor with many years' experience. She has worked as a commissioning editor for BBC Focus and is a regular contributor to Who Do You Think You Are? magazine. She is co-author, with Paul Parsons, of The Periodic Table, which became a number 1 Amazon bestseller.

Gemma Lavender

Gemma Lavender is editor of All About Space magazine and writes for Astronomy Now and Physics World magazines. She has worked for Scientific Reports and the Institute of Physics and holds a Master of Physics.

Giles Sparrow

Giles Sparrow studied Astronomy at University College London, and works as an editor specializing in popular science. He is the author of - amongst other books - The Genius Test, The Universe and How To See It, The Stargazer's Handbook and Hubble: Window on the Universe and was a major contributor to Dorling Kindersley's Universe.

Joanne Baker

Joanne Baker studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge and took her PhD at the University of Sydney in 1995. She is a physical science editor at Science magazine, where her speciality is space and earth science.

Julia Collins

Julia Collins has a PhD in 4-dimensional Knot Theory from the University of Edinburgh, where she spent five years as the Mathematics Engagement Officer, with a remit to lecture and spread an appreciation of mathematics. She is now Outreach Officer at the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute. Julia's writing has been published in Nature and in Princeton University Press' anthology The Best Writing on Mathematics. She is a winner of the How to Talk Maths in Public competition, has been nominated for the London Mathematical Society's Anne Bennett prize, and organised the world's first Maths Craft Festival.

Paul Parsons

Dr Paul Parsons is a regular contributor to Nature, New Scientist and the Daily Telegraph. He frequently appears on BBC radio and his television credits include Richard & Judy and BBC Breakfast. He was formerly editor of the BBC's award-winning science and technology magazine Focus. The Science of Doctor Who (Icon Books), was longlisted for the Royal Society Prize for Science Books. His latest book is Science 1001 published by Quercus.

Shaun Usher

Shaun Usher's obsession with old-fashioned correspondence began when he fell in love with his future wife, Karina, by letter in 2002. This ultimately led to the 2009 launch of Letters of Note, an online museum of "correspondence deserving of a wider audience" which to date has been visited more than 100 million times. Four years later, his website spawned a much-anticipated book of the same name, the first of three books "of note" to be crowdfunded with Unbound; it was published in 2013 to widespread acclaim, has since become an international bestseller, and inspired Letters Live, a star-studded live show in which these letters are brought to life on stage.Shaun lives in Manchester with Karina and their two sons

Tony Crilly

Tony Crilly is Reader in Mathematical Sciences at Middlesex University, having previously taught at the University of Michigan, the City University in Hong Kong, and the Open University. His principal research interest is the history of mathematics, and he has written and edited many works on fractals, chaos and computing. He is the author of the acclaimed biography of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley.