Related to: 'Complete Guide to Digital Photography'

riverrun

Testament

Kim Sherwood
Authors:
Kim Sherwood

Winner of the Bath Novel AwardThe letter was in the Blue Room - her grandfather's painting studio, where Eva spent the happier days of her childhood. After his death, she is the one responsible for his legacy - a legacy threatened by the letter she finds. It is from the Jewish Museum in Berlin.They have found the testimony her grandfather gave after surviving the labour camps in Austria. And, since he was one of Britain's greatest twentieth century artists, they want to exhibit it. But Joseph Silk - leaving behind József Zyyad - remade himself long ago. As Eva begins to uncover the truth, she understands the trauma, and the lies, that have haunted her family. She will unravel what happened to József and his brother, who came to England as refugees. One never spoke of his past - the other couldn't let it go. Their story - and that of the woman they both loved - is in her hands. Revealing it would change her grandfather's hard-won identity. But it could also change the tide of history. This testament can lend words to wordless grief, and teach her how to live.Kim Sherwood's extraordinary first novel is a powerful statement of intent. Beautifully written, moving and hopeful, it crosses the tidemark where the third generation meets the first, finding a new language to express love, loss and our place within history.

riverrun

Feeling is the Thing that Happens in 1000th of a Second

Christian Ryan
Authors:
Christian Ryan
Quercus

Mountain Higher

Daniel Friebe, Pete Goding
Authors:
Daniel Friebe, Pete Goding

The hidden gems of Europe's best roads and passes, from the authors of the hugely successful Mountain High.Following the success of Mountain High: Europe's Greatest Cycle Climbs comes a volume focusing on the continent's lesser-known, challenging and spectacular mountain roads and passes. From the heights of the Ötztal Glacier Road in Austria to the 'secret' side of the legendary Alpe d'Huez, Mountain Higher: Europe's Extreme, Undiscovered and Unforgettable Cycle Climbs explores 50 soon-to-be cult locations and captures stunning scenery from off the beaten track. Featuring the technical details (maps, profiles, lengths, heights) that made Mountain High an indispensable reference book, as well as dynamic descriptions of the routes themselves and Pete Goding's breathtaking photography, this book is a stylish and practical guide to the hidden gems that every true cycling enthusiast needs to know about.

Quercus

The ABC From Space

Adam Voiland
Authors:
Adam Voiland

MacLehose Press

The Great Swindle

Pierre Lemaitre
Authors:
Pierre Lemaitre

October 1918: the war on the Western Front is all but over. Desperate for one last chance of promotion, the ambitious Lieutenant Henri d'Aulnay Pradelle sends two scouts over the top, and secretly shoots them in the back to incite his men to heroic action once more.And so is set in motion a series of devastating events that will inextricably bind together the fates and fortunes of Pradelle and the two soldiers who witness his crime: Albert Maillard and Édouard Péricourt.Back in civilian life, Albert and Édouard struggle to adjust to a society whose reverence for its dead cannot quite match its resentment for those who survived. But the two soldiers conspire to enact an audacious form of revenge against the country that abandoned them to penury and despair, with a scheme to swindle the whole of France on an epic scale.Meanwhile, believing her brother killed in action, Édouard's sister Madeleine has married Pradelle, who is running a little scam of his own...(P)2015 MacLehose Press

Quercus

The Digital Filmmaking Handbook

Mark Brindle
Authors:
Mark Brindle
Quercus

The Digital Photography Handbook (FIXED FORMAT EDITION)

Doug Harman
Authors:
Doug Harman
Quercus

The Digital Photography Handbook

Doug Harman
Authors:
Doug Harman
Quercus

The Digital Photography Handbook

Doug Harman
Authors:
Doug Harman

In the last few years digital cameras and 'digital darkrooms' in the form of computers and image manipulation software have revolutionized modern photography. Truly professional results are tantalizingly within reach of all - and The Digital Photography Handbook shows you how to combine photographic flair with digital expertise to achieve them. Part one looks at the cameras, the lenses and other hardware accessories, explains the technology behind them and helps you choose exactly what you need. Part two explores the art of photography itself, from composing a shot to considerations such as depth of field, focus or exposure. It also examines a series of themes such as landscapes, weddings and holidays providing tips and ideas for how to photograph them. Part three moves into the 'digital darkroom'. Here, expert instruction will give you the confidence to correct common problems and get the most out of your images, while a series of masterclasses focuses on professional image manipulation techniques and artistic effects, breaking them down into step-by-step stages for you to follow. Finally, part four looks at printing your photographs - whether to paper or on to the web. For those interested in taking their photography a little further, it explores building a portfolio and offers advice on copyright and selling your pictures. In this new, updated edition Doug Harrman includes the very latest developments in digital technology, equipping you with everything you need to become an accomplished 21st-century photographer.

Adam Voiland

Adam Voiland is a science writer and the social media editor for the NASA Earth Observatory.

Christian Ryan

Christian Ryan is one of the most stylish and intelligent of writers on the sport today. He was awarded UK Cricket Book of the Year in 2010 for Golden Boy, his book on Kim Hughes's tempestuous period as Captain of the Australian Cricket team.

Doug Harman

Doug Harman has over 15 year's experience as a journalist, writer, photographer, and digital camera and technology tester. He has written extensively for a multitude of digital photography magazines and websites, including Amateur Photographer, What Digital Camera, Total Digital Photography, Professional Photographer and Photography Monthly. David Jones is a professional photographer with an extensive commercial portfolio, particularly in the fashion and advertising industries. He has also been widely exhibited and contributed photographs to many magazines and books, including Brunel, How to Keep Dinosaurs and Master Chef.

Ian Farrell

Ian Farrell has been shooting pictures since his parents bought him an SLR for his 12th birthday, and hasn't been far from a camera since. He is a professional portrait photographer with studios in both London and Cambridge. Author of the bestselling Digital Photography Beyond the Camera, Ian also writes for a number of leading industry publications, including Amateur Photography, British Journal of Photography, DSLR Photography and Digital Photography. He lives in Cambridge, UK.

Welovethisbook.com

Q&A with Elly and Keith Walters

Elly Griffiths tells us about her fourth novel in the Ruth Galloway Investigation series, a possible BBC adaptation, and why she hates Time Team In A Room Full of Bones, new mother and forensic archeologist Ruth finds a museum curator dead ahead of the opening of a new medieval bones exhibition. How have the character dynamics changed now that Ruth Galloway’s one-year-old daughter Kate is around? It feels like a real privilege to have the time and space to develop the characters. It does get easier but I have to say that Kate was a challenge. I wanted her to be a distinct presence in Ruth’s life – every parent knows that a baby disrupts your life completely – but I didn’t want the books to become diatribes about the hardships of being a single parent. Are museums somewhere you spend a lot of time? I used to live in South London and visited the Horniman Museum in Forest Hill a few times. I have to say, though, that the museum that influenced me most is the Booth Museum in Hove. It’s very near my old school and I remember many happy stolen hours staring at the Great Auk... Was it always your intention to make Ruth dissimilar to traditional female detectives, with her clumsiness and weight issues? I just wanted to make her real. It wasn’t until after the book was published that I realised how many crime heroines were, in essence, superwomen – looking beautiful, cooking gourmet meals, running twenty miles before breakfast. Ruth could certainly eat a gourmet meal but she would struggle with the rest. Are the Rebus and Springsteen references in the books favourites of yours, as they appear to be the books and CDs of choice to Ruth Galloway? Do you have a favourite Boss album? Yes, I’m a big fan of both Ian Rankin and Bruce Springsteen. My favourite Springsteen album is Born to Run and my favourite track is Thunder Road. Are there any crime writers who have been a particular help or influence when you started out? I hadn’t read a lot of crime novels when I wrote The Crossing Places. My biggest influences were probably Victorian writers like Wilkie Collins. Since then I have met quite a few stars of the crime world and they have all been incredibly friendly and supportive. Val McDermid, in particular, has been delightful. Crime writers seem particularly charming. Maybe they exorcise all their demons in their books. I don’t know any Brighton-based writers, though I did meet Peter James when we were both shortlisted for the same award. You featured a location map in the first book, The Crossing Places, are there any plans to get maps into any future books? I love drawing maps and managed to get one into The House at Sea’s End. I think every book should have a map at the front. How do you write? My system hasn’t really changed. I write a rough chapter-by-chapter outline and then go for it. I write for about three hours a day and the rest of the time it’s going round in my head. I hope my plots have got a bit better as I’ve gone on though. Is Ruth going to be brought to the TV screen? The BBC has expressed interest, but I don’t think I’m allowed to say more than that. I would love to see Ruth on TV. Not sure who would play her, though... The location of your books is fantastic and they all give a tremendous sense of place - but could you ever see yourself writing Ruth into Brighton, or writing a standalone novel in Brighton? Or is your hometown too crowded with fictional crime already? Peter James does have Brighton sewn up and I’m sure I couldn’t better him. I do have a vague idea about a historical crime novel set in Brighton, though. My granddad was a music hall comedian and I’d love to write about that world. Ruth has no plans to leave Norfolk, although in book five she does visit Blackpool. Why does Ruth not like Time Team? Well, I have a bit of a grudge against Time Team, as my husband had a well-paid city job before he started watching it and now he’s a poorly-paid archaeologist! I think it’s a great programme, but Ruth, being a professional, would be rather sniffy about it (whilst, at the same time, watching it avidly). What can we look forward to next from Ruth Galloway or from Elly Griffiths? I’ve almost finished book five, which will be about Roman remains found near Blackpool. It takes Ruth into Nelson’s territory and, of course, into danger. I’ve already got a pretty good idea for Book 6. After that, who knows? A Room Full of Bones is out tomorrow, published by Quercus.

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Quercus highlights for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Big books for February

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick up a new book? Trust us; it’s the best present you could get yourself or a loved one on the day-that-shall-not-be-named in February. We’ve rounded up some of our biggest February titles to give you some ideas. Don’t Tell the Brides-to-be, Anna Bell The author who brought you Don’t Tell the Boss and Don’t Tell the Groom, brings you the brand new instalment in her series: Don’t Tell the Brides-to-Be. Penny is back, and things are finally looking up. The gambling is gone. Instead Penny has a new focus, her new business: Princess on a Shoestring, an all-inclusive service for brides-to-be looking to plan low budget, but beautiful weddings. Wedding planning, however, proves to be no piece of cake, but family rows and bridesmaid calamities prove to be the least of her problems; another planner is intent on taking her down, step by step, bride by bride. Can Penny save her reputation before it’s too late? This Valentine’s Day put down the lingerie and the over-priced sickly sweet chocolate and think outside the traditional heart-shaped box. Don’t Tell the Brides-To-Be is an inspiriting story with an abundance of fun that you’ll enjoy long after those rose petals have wilted. The Lovers of Amherst, William Nicholson William Nicholson’s CV reads like a who’s who of Hollywood stars and literary accolades. William is a British screenwriter who co-wrote the script for the film Gladiator and who also scripted Les Misérables and Mandela. His books are critically acclaimed and are often cited as cinematic examples of fiction. His latest novel, The Lovers of Amherst is a beautifully written depiction of the life of the poet Emily Dickinson, and how her life influenced others. The prose is elegant, fluid and believable, the context intelligent and thorough. The Lovers of Amherst introduces a sophisticated and alternate approach to the taboo and negativity surrounding marital affairs. This is one not to miss. Stonebird, Mike Revell Mike Revell’s touching and delicate debut novel, Stonebird has been gaining fans left, right and centre. Described by Fiona Noble from The Bookseller as ‘A really special debut, full of heart, hope and the power of storytelling’, it follows ten-year-old Liam who learns the importance of memory, what it is to lose, and how to grow up. When ten-year-old Liam moves house to be closer to his dementia-suffering grandma, he’s thrown into an unfamiliar place, with a family that seems to be falling apart. Liam doesn’t remember what his grandma was like before she became ill. He only knows the witch-like old woman who snaps and snarls and eats her birthday cards. He wants to fix it, but he can’t. When Liam stumbles upon an old stone gargoyle in an abandoned church that isn’t your usual gargoyle he begins to think things can change, can they? Mike Revell’s Stonebird both bewitches and teaches. Do you believe in the magic of stories? Stonebird is one destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A Killing Winter, Tom Callaghan ‘My world is a hopeless, brutal place, a land peopled only by regrets and lost love.’ Set in Kyrgyz, with passages described in effortless vivid detail, so much so that you’ll be able to taste the ice on your tongue and the alcohol in the back of your throat, A Killing Winter is an unforgettable debut. A woman has been brutally murdered, the snow is dyed red. When Inspector Akyl Borubaev of Bishkek Murder Squad arrives at the scene, all evidence points towards a ruthless serial killer. But when the victim’s father turns out to be a government minister, Borubaev has to solve the case not only quickly but also quietly, by any means possible. Until more bodies are found . . . The deadly but beautifully written prose is so consuming, so alluring, that even the faint hearted and weak kneed will struggle to put it down. This is crime writing at its best.

Our favourite reads this winter

February Round-Up

Our favourite reads this winter

February is a month where everybody begins to feel the spring in their step return. You’ve battled through the long, cold and dark month of January and finally, extraordinarily slowly, you have made it into February, the shortest month of the year. To celebrate, and why shouldn’t you, why not pick u

February Round-Up

Our Favourite Reads This Winter

February Round-Up