Related to: 'Paris to the Moon: Family in France'

riverrun

At the Strangers' Gate

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

'A dazzling talent' Malcolm GladwellWhen Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers' Gate builds a portrait of this particular moment in New York through the story of this couple's journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side, and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. He takes us through his professional meanderings, from graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the corridors of Conde Nast and the galleries of MoMA. Between tender and humorous reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others, Gopnik discusses the ethics of ambition, the economy of creative capital, and the peculiar anthropology of art and aspiration in New York, then and now.

riverrun

In Mid-Air

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik
riverrun

Winter

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

riverrun

The Table Comes First

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik
riverrun

Through The Children's Gate

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik
riverrun

Angels and Ages

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik
riverrun

Paris to the Moon

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Allegra McEvedy

Allegra McEvedy has been cooking professionally for 20 years and has worked in some of London's best restaurants, including The River Cafe and The Groucho Club. She is co-founder of healthy fast food chain LEON. Allegra's TV credits include Allegra's Turkish Delights, Economy Gastronomy, BBC Two's Great British Food Revival, and guest-chef appearances on Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's Three Good Things. Allegra presents frequently on BBC Radio 4 and is a regular contributor to the Guardian and various food magazines. This is her sixth book.

Alyson Waters

ALYSON WATERS is a translator whose translations include works by Vassilis Alexakis, Daniel Arasse, René Belletto, Emmanuel Bove, Eric Chevillard, Albert Cossery, and Yasmina Khadra. Her translation of Chevillard's Prehistoric Times won the Florence Gould-French American Foundation Translation Prize for 2012. Alyson has received an NEA Translation Fellowship, a PEN Translation Fund Grant, and residencies from the Centre national du livre, the Villa Gillet (Lyon, France), and the Banff International Literary Translation Centre. She teaches literary translation at NYU and Columbia and has been the editor of Yale French Studies for twenty years.

Antonin Varenne

Antonin Varenne was awarded the Prix Michel Lebrun and the Grand Prix du Jury Sang d'encre for Bed of Nails, his first novel to be translated into English. His second, Loser's Corner was awarded the Prix des Lecteurs Quais du polar - 20 minutes and the Prix du Meilleur Polar Francophone.

Barbara Constantine

Barbara Constantine was born in Nice, France in 1955. She is scriptwriter and ceramacist as well as a novelist. Justin Phipps is a British translator who translates from French and Russian into English. After studying modern languages and social anthropology, he has worked in overseas development and more recently as a solicitor specialising in employment law.

Bruno Vincent

Bruno Vincent is the author of several humour titles including (with Jon Butler) the bestselling Do Ants Have Arseholes?, a Christmas No.1 back in the more innocent days of Myspace and News of the World. He has also written two volumes of gothic horror stories for children which were adapted for the stage.

Charlotte Pike

As a student, Charlotte Pike spent four years learning to survive on a meagre £10 a week and still eat seriously well. The skills she picked up in her university kitchen led her to train as a qualified cook and set up her own company called GoFreeFoods for people with food intolerances. Charlotte blogs on student cookery for the Guardian, writes a regular food blog for Hello! magazine and gives frequent cooking demos at food fairs around the UK.

Daniel Pennac

Daniel Pennac was born in 1944 in Morocco. He was a teacher before becoming a writer of books for children and a series of hugely successful humorous novels. A continued interest in education and social affairs led to his book The Rights of the Reader, and thereafter to School Blues, for which he won the Prix Renaudot.

Dominique Sylvain

Dominique Sylvain worked as a journalist in Paris before relocating to Asia where she lived for spells in Japan and Singapore. She is the author of thirteen crime novels and now lives once more in Tokyo where she writes full-time.

Eileen Horne

Eileen Horne was born in California, and has lived in Italy and London for thirty-five years. She spent two decades as a television producer in the UK, founding her own production company in 1997 and making over a hundred hours of drama, among them two projects inspired by Zola's novels.She now combines writing, including adaptations for radio and television, with teaching and editing. Her first book, The Pitch, was published by Faber in 2006 and she translated an Italian novella for the MacLehose Press collection Judges (2014). She lives in London and Umbria with her husband and daughter.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Georges Perec

Georges Perec, born 1936, decided to be a writer at around the age of eighteen, but had a day job as a librarian in a medical research laboratory for most of his adult life. He made his first impact in 1965 with a barely fictional portrait of his own generation, Things. Shortly after, he joined Oulipo, the experimental "workshop" for mathematics and literature founded by Raymond Queneau and Francois Le Lionnais, of which he became the most ardent and celebrated doyen. He is the author of A Void, a novel written without the letter "e", of the semi-autobiographical W or The Memory of Childhood, and, most famously, of Life A User's Manual, hailed by Italo Calvino as "the last real 'event' in the history of the novel so far". He lived in Paris, and died of lung cancer in 1982. Portrait of a Man, written in 1960, remained unpublished in French until 2012. publication.

Geraint Thomas

Geraint Thomas MBE is the winner of the 2018 Tour de France, a double Olympic gold medallist and multiple world champion who has been an indispensable part of Team Sky since its inception. A Tour de France veteran, he had both completed the entire race with a fractured pelvis and been essential in piloting Chris Froome to the yellow jersey multiple times before his own win. One of the most popular men in the peloton, he has watched and contributed from the inside as British cycling has been transformed over the past decade. In 2014 he won Commonwealth road race gold in Glasgow and was voted BBC Wales Sports Personality of the Year. In 2015 he became the first British rider to win the E3 Harelbeke: in 2016 he won Paris-Nice and in early 2018 won the Criterium du Dauphine.