Related to: 'Paris to the Moon: Family in France'

riverrun

In Mid-Air

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

'Engaging, witty, thoughtful, clever, casual, ebullient, erudite and thoroughly modern' Spectator'A dazzling talent - hilarious, winning and deft' Malcolm Gladwell In Mid-Air is a collection of short essays by the acclaimed writer and speaker, Adam Gopnik. Known for his ability to perceive 'the whole world in a grain of sand', he uses this format to take a dizzying range of subjects and intricately explore their meaning to our lives - as people, as citizens and as families. From how he works so that his daughter can have holes in her clothes, to why appropriation is more empowering than oppressing; from French sex to binge-watching TV, from the secret of a happy marriage to why we should mention the war ­­- each topic is illuminated by his erudition and wit. As in their original form on the radio, Gopnik's essays - each one a pleasure garden of wry confessions, self-deprecating asides, wordplay and striking insights - feel like the most intimate of conversations between writer and reader; yet at the same time they capture a public forum of pithy debate and tender persuasion. Above all, In Mid-Air initiates a sense of wonder in the ordinary that yearns to be shared.(P)2018 Quercus Editions Limited

riverrun

At the Strangers' Gate

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

'A dazzling talent' Malcolm GladwellWhen Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers' Gate builds a portrait of this particular moment in New York through the story of this couple's journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side, and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. He takes us through his professional meanderings, from graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the corridors of Conde Nast and the galleries of MoMA. Between tender and humorous reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others, Gopnik discusses the ethics of ambition, the economy of creative capital, and the peculiar anthropology of art and aspiration in New York, then and now.

riverrun

Winter

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

riverrun

The Table Comes First

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

riverrun

Through The Children's Gate

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

On every page of this delicious book you will meet characters and situations that tell you this could only be New York. The parents who are determined to get their children literally to fly at the school production of Peter Pan - the Cambodian cashier at the local deli who is more Jewish than Gopnik's grandfather - his gloriously peculiar analyst who argues that a name can be damaging to the human psyche, saying Adam's name is very ugly - the birder who takes Adam to see the huge flock of feral parrots that have taken over Flatbush. No one knows how they got there or how they survive the brutal winters, but they do. And flourish on it. 'These birds are so bold. They are real New Yorkers. They have so much attitude'.Through the Children's Gate is written with Gopnik's signature mix of mind and heart, elegantly and exultantly alert to the minute miracles that bring a place to life.

riverrun

Angels and Ages

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

'Adam Gopnik has taken a coincidence and turned it into a theory of everything, or at least of everything important ... Outstanding' - Andrew MarrOn February 12th, 1809, two men were born an ocean apart: Abraham Lincoln in a one-room Kentucky log cabin; Charles Darwin on an English country estate. Each would see his life's work transform mankind's understanding of itself. In this bicentennial twin portrait, Adam Gopnik shows how these two giants, who never met, changed the way we think about the very nature of existence, and that their great achievements proceeded from the same source: argument from reason. The revolutions they effected shaped the world we live in, while the intellectual heritage and method that informed their parallel lives has profound implications for our present age. Filled with little-known stories and unfamiliar characters, Angels and Ages reveals these men in a new, shared light, and provides a fascinating insight into the origins of our modern vision and liberal values.

riverrun

Paris to the Moon

Adam Gopnik
Authors:
Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Antonin Varenne

Antonin Varenne was awarded the Prix Michel Lebrun and the Grand Prix du Jury Sang d'encre for Bed of Nails, his first novel to be translated into English. His second, Loser's Corner was awarded the Prix des Lecteurs Quais du polar - 20 minutes and the Prix du Meilleur Polar Francophone.

Bruno Vincent

Bruno Vincent is the author of several humour titles including (with Jon Butler) the bestselling Do Ants Have Arseholes?, a Christmas No.1 back in the more innocent days of Myspace and News of the World. He has also written two volumes of gothic horror stories for children which were adapted for the stage.

Charlotte Pike

As a student, Charlotte Pike spent four years learning to survive on a meagre £10 a week and still eat seriously well. The skills she picked up in her university kitchen led her to train as a qualified cook and set up her own company called GoFreeFoods for people with food intolerances. Charlotte blogs on student cookery for the Guardian, writes a regular food blog for Hello! magazine and gives frequent cooking demos at food fairs around the UK.

Dominique Sylvain

Dominique Sylvain worked as a journalist in Paris before relocating to Asia where she lived for spells in Japan and Singapore. She is the author of thirteen crime novels and now lives once more in Tokyo where she writes full-time.

Euan Cameron

Euan Cameron's translations include works by Julien Green, Simone de Beauvoir and Paul Morand, and biographies of Marcel Proust and Irène Némirovsky.

Georges Perec

Georges Perec, born 1936, decided to be a writer at around the age of eighteen, but had a day job as a librarian in a medical research laboratory for most of his adult life. He made his first impact in 1965 with a barely fictional portrait of his own generation, Things. Shortly after, he joined Oulipo, the experimental "workshop" for mathematics and literature founded by Raymond Queneau and Francois Le Lionnais, of which he became the most ardent and celebrated doyen. He is the author of A Void, a novel written without the letter "e", of the semi-autobiographical W or The Memory of Childhood, and, most famously, of Life A User's Manual, hailed by Italo Calvino as "the last real 'event' in the history of the novel so far". He lived in Paris, and died of lung cancer in 1982. Portrait of a Man, written in 1960, remained unpublished in French until 2012. publication.

Hilary Boyd

Hilary Boyd trained as a nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital, then as a marriage guidance counselor. After a degree in English Literature at London University in her thirties, she moved into health journalism, writing a Mind, Body, Spirit column for the Daily Express. She published six non-fiction books on health-related subjects before turning to fiction and writing a string of bestsellers, starting with Thursdays in the Park. Hilary is married to film director/producer Don Boyd and lives near Chichester, West Sussex.

Jonathan Black

Jonathan Black is the nom de plume of Mark Booth, who read Philosophy and Theology at Oriel College, Oxford and who has worked in publishing for over twenty years, publishing authors including Auberon Waugh, Derek Jarman, Chris Ryan, Katie Price, Peter Kay and Rod Liddle. He has also published many of the leading writers in the field of alternative history, including Baigent and Leigh, Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, Robert Temple, Knight and Lomas, David Ovason, Colin Wilson and David Rohl.

Lars Mytting

Lars Mytting, a novelist and journalist, was born in Fåvang, Norway, in 1968. His novel Svøm med dem som drukner (published in English as The Sixteen Trees of the Somme) was awarded the Norwegian National Booksellers' Award and has been bought for film. Norwegian Wood has become an international bestseller, and was the Bookseller Industry Awards Non-Fiction Book of the Year 2016.

Madame de Lafayette

Madame de Lafayette was born in Paris in 1634. After living in the country with her husband for a time, she returned to Paris in the 1660s. There, she ran a literary salon from her home and cultivated connections with the court of King Louis XIV. The Princess de Clèves was published anonymously in 1678, became an immediate succès de scandal and is considered a classic of French literature.

Marcus Weeks

Marcus Weeks is the author of the hugely successful Philosophy in Minutes, Psychology in Minutes and Politics in Minutes. He has written numerous other books and contributed to prestigious reference works such as The Philosophy Book, the Millennium Encyclopedia and the Definitive Visual Guide series.

Marie NDiaye

Marie NDiaye was born in France in 1967. She published her first novel at seventeen, and has won the Prix Femina (Rosie Carpe in 2001) and the Prix Goncourt (Three Strong Women, 2009). Her play Papa Doit Manger has been taken into the repertoire of the Comédie Française. In 2007, after the election of Nicolas Sarkozy, NDiaye left France with her family to live in Berlin.