Related to: 'Birth of a Bridge'

MacLehose Press

Mend the Living

Maylis de Kerangal
Authors:
Maylis de Kerangal

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Adèle Geras

Adèle Geras is the author of many acclaimed stories for children as well as five adult novels, including: Facing the Light, Hester's Story, Made in Heaven and A Hidden Life (all available in ebook from Quercus), Cover Your Eyes (available in print from Quercus) and Out of the Dark, a special short story for the literary charity Quick Reads. Adèle lives near Cambridge and is the mother of the thriller writer Sophie Hannah.

Bernardo Atxaga

Bernardo Atxaga was born in Gipuzkoa in Spain in 1951 and lives in the Basque Country, writing in Basque and Spanish. He is a prizewinning novelist and poet, whose books, including Obabakoak (1992), The Accordionist's Son (2007) and most recently Seven Houses in France (2012), have won critical acclaim in Spain and abroad. His works have been translated into twenty-two languages.

Carolina Sanín

Carolina Sanín is a Colombian author and academic, born in Bogotá in 1973. She studied for a Ph.D in Hispanic Literature at Yale University and has taught at the State University of New York and the University of Los Andes. Her previous works include novels, essays, short stories and writing for children. The Children was first published in Spanish in 2014 and is Sanín's first to appear in English.

CC Gibbs

CC Gibbs was born and lives in the USA. She is the author of over 40 romance and erotica novels, including the recent bestsellers Knight's Mistress and Knight's Game. Many of her novels were originally published under the name Susan Johnson.

Claire Vaye Watkins

Claire Vaye Watkins was raised in the Mojave Desert, in California and Nevada. Her writing has appeared in Granta, The Paris Review, New York Times and elsewhere. Her short story collection, Battleborn, won five awards, including the Dylan Thomas Award; was finalist for two; and was named Book of the Year by five publications. In 2012, Claire was selected as one of the National Book Foundation's '5 Under 35'. A Guggenheim Fellow and an assistant professor at Bucknell University, she is also the co-director of the Mojave School, a free creative writing workshop for teenagers in rural Nevada. Gold Fame Citrus is her first novel.clairevayewatkins.com / facebook.clairevaye.watkins / twitter@clairevaye

Domenica De Rosa

Domenica de Rosa started her career working at the Bookseller, and went on to work in children's publishing, in publicity and in editorial. Under the name Elly Griffiths she is the author of the acclaimed and bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway series of mysteries, and the Stephens and Mephisto mysteries. Domenica is half-Italian and loves the Tuscan coast, although she mainly settles for Brighton, where she lives with her husband, their twins and their cat.

Guillermo Arriaga

Guillermo Arriaga is a Mexican author, screenwriter, director and producer. His novels, Escuadrón Guillotina (1991), A Sweet Smell to Death (1994), The Buffalo of the Night (1999) and short story collection, Retorno 201, have been translated into eighteen languages. His films include Amores Perros, 21 Grams, Babel and The Burning Plain. He has recently produced the story of Desde Alla, the first Ibero-American film to win the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. In February 2017 he won the Mazatlan Prixe for Literature for The Wild One.

Joe Gores

Joe Gores (1931--) was educated at Notre Dame University and Stanford University, served in the US Army, writing biographies of generals, and spent twelve years as a San Francisco private investigator. He is the author of the acclaimed DKA Files series and has written screenplays and television scripts. He has won three Edgar Allan Awards and Japan's Maltese Falcon Award.

Joël Dicker

Joël Dicker was born in Geneva in 1985, where he studied Law. The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair was nominated for the Prix Goncourt and won the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens. It has sold more than 3.6 million copies in 42 countries. The Baltimore Boys, at once a prequel and a sequel, has sold more than 750,000 in France.

Kjell Westö

Born in 1961, Kjell Westö lives in Helsinki. He made his literary debut in 1986, and since then has published poetry, collections of short stories, and novels. His five great novels set in Helsinki in the twentieth century have established him as a leading name among today's Swedish-language writers in Finland. His international breakthrough came in 2006 with the novel Där vi en gang gått (Where Once We Walked), which was translated into most major European languages and for which he was awarded the Finlandia Prize, Finland's most prestigious literary prize. His novel Hägring 38 (The Wednesday Club) was awarded the Nordic Council award 2014.

Mark Polizzotti

MARK POLIZZOTTI is the translator of more than thirty books from the French, including works by Gustave Flaubert, Marguerite Duras, Jean Echenoz, and Maurice Roche. His articles and reviews have appeared in The Wall Street Journal and The Nation. He is Publisher and Editor-in-Chief at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Paolo Sorrentino

Paolo Sorrentino was born on May 31, 1970 in Naples, Campania, Italy. He is a director and writer, known for The Great Beauty (2013), This Must Be the Place (2011) and Il divo: La spettacolare vita di Giulio Andreotti (2008). He is married to Daniela D'Antonio.

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano was born in Paris, France in 1945. He was the recipient of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature. He previously won the 2012 Austrian State Prize for European Literature, the 2010 Prix mondial Cino Del Duca from the Institut de France for lifetime achievement, the 1978 Prix Goncourt for Rue des boutiques obscures, and the 1972 Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française for Les Boulevards de ceinture.

Peter Matthiessen

Peter Matthiessen - novelist, naturalist and explorer - is the only writer to have won National Book Awards in fiction and non-fiction. As well as the Watson Trilogy, his fiction includes At Play in the Fields of the Lord and Far Tortuga. His non-fiction includes The Snow Leopard (National Book Award winner) and In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. He was one of the founders of the Paris Review and his pieces appear regularly in the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books.

Sam Bourne

Sam Bourne is the pseudonym of award-winning journalist and broadcaster Jonathan Freedland, who writes a weekly column for the Guardian and is the presenter of BBC Radio 4's contemporary history series, The Long View. He served for four years as the Guardian's Washington correspondent, covered the 2016 US election campaign and is a widely respected commentator on American affairs. His previous seven internationally bestselling novels have sold over 2 million copies and been published in over 30 languages.

Tom Rachman

Born in London and raised in Vancouver, Tom Rachman was a foreign correspondent for the Associated Press stationed in Rome, then an editor at the International Herald Tribune in Paris. He is the author of three novels, the international bestseller The Imperfectionists; The Rise and Fall of Great Powers and The Italian Teacher, as well as a short stories collection, Basket of Deplorables. He lives in London.

Tupelo Hassman

Tupelo Hassman graduated from Columbia's MFA programme. Her writing has been published in the Portland Review Literary Journal, Paper Street Press, Tantalum, We Still Like and ZYZZYVA, among others. Girlchild is her first novel. She lives in Oakland, California.

William Thomson

William Thomson is an artist, author and oceanographer. He runs the website tidalcompass.com where he produces hand-illustrated tidal charts. He lives wherever the water is best.