Heather O'Neill - Lullabies for Little Criminals - Quercus

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    • ISBN:9781849164573
    • Publication date:31 Mar 2014
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    • ISBN:9781780870991
    • Publication date:01 Jul 2011

Lullabies for Little Criminals

By Heather O'Neill
Read by Patricia Rodriguez

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

Shortlisted for the Women's Fiction Prize, the startling story of a girl who has to bring herself up

'Like Angela Carter, she is relentlessly inventive' Sunday Times
'Full of pathos, spirit and iridescent innocence' Independent on Sunday

The first novel by the author of The Lonely Hearts Hotel

12-year-old Baby is used to turmoil in her life. Her mother is long dead, her father is a junkie and they shuttle between rotting apartments and decrepit downtown hotels.

As her father's addiction and paranoia grow worse, she begins a journey that will lead her through chaos and hardship; but Baby's remarkable strength of spirit enables her to survive. Smart, funny and determined to lift herself off the city's dirty streets, she knows that the only person she can truly rely upon is herself.

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  • ISBN: 9781847243935
  • Publication date: 03 Jul 2008
  • Page count: 384
  • Imprint: riverrun
Told with shafts of wit and a lightness of touch which few novels on such themes achieve. Baby, like Holden Caulfield of Catcher in the Rye, is totally believable. Although few people suffer a childhood like hers, everyone can identify with her feelings, on the threshold of adolescence longing for stability and recognition — Times Literary Supplement
From feisty little Scout of To Kill a Mockingbird to Sissy Spacek's blank-eyed Holly in the film Badlands, Heather O'Neill draws on the annals of knowing child narrators to shape Baby's shabby, scrappy scrabble from broken home to detention centre to pimp's lap and back again. Scabrous humour and brutal insight fairly jolt each episode into life — Observer
Vivid and poignant . . . O'Neill's novel builds to a riveting climax . . . deeply moving — Independent
O'Neill bombards the reader with piercing observations and magical imagery . . . Her story is bleak, yet not bitter; full of pathos, spirit and, overwhelmingly, an iridescent innocence — Independent on Sunday
O'Neill's vivid prose owes a debt to Donna Tartt's The Little Friend. Baby's precocious introspection feels pitch perfect. Tear-jerkingly effective — Publishers Weekly
Dreamy prose . . . Baby's unique voice and the glimmer of hope provided by her intelligence and imaginative spirit live on in the mind long after you have closed the book — Waterstones Book Quarterly
Heather O'Neill's style is laced with so much sublime possibility and merciless actuality that it makes me think of comets and live wires — Helen Oyeyemi
...dreamy prose...Baby's unique voice and the glimmer of hope provided by her intelligence and imaginative spirit live on in the mind long after you have closed the book - Waterstones Books Quarterly — Waterstone's Books Quarterly
...vivid and poignant...a deeply moving and troubling novel - Independent — Independent
From feisty little Scout of To Kill a Mockingbird to Sissy Spacek's blank-eyed Holly in the film Badlands, Heather O'Neill draws on the annals of knowing child narrators to shape Baby's shabby, scrappy scrabble from broken home to detention centre to pimp's lap and back again. Scabrous humour and brutal insight fairly jolt each episode into life - The Observer — Observer
O'Neill's vivid prose owes a debt to Donna Tartt's The Little Friend. Baby's precocious introspection feels pitch perfect. Tear-jerkingly effective - Publishers' Weekly — Publisher's weekly
A remarkable novel that could turn out to be huge. the very rich descriptions of a tumultuous young life and emotional reaction to each new situation add up to a cracking good read - Publishing News — Publishing News
Told with shafts of wit and a lightness of touch which few novels on such themes achieve. Baby, like Holden Caulfield of Catcher in the Rye, is totally believable. Although few people suffer a childhood like hers, everyone can identify with her feelings, on the threshold of adolescence longing for stability and recognition
From feisty little Scout of To Kill a Mockingbird to Sissy Spacek's blank-eyed Holly in the film Badlands, Heather O'Neill draws on the annals of knowing child narrators to shape Baby's shabby, scrappy scrabble from broken home to detention centre to pimp's lap and back again. Scabrous humour and brutal insight fairly jolt each episode into life
Vivid and poignant . . . O'Neill's novel builds to a riveting climax . . . deeply moving
O'Neill bombards the reader with piercing observations and magical imagery . . . Her story is bleak, yet not bitter; full of pathos, spirit and, overwhelmingly, an iridescent innocence
O'Neill's vivid prose owes a debt to Donna Tartt's The Little Friend. Baby's precocious introspection feels pitch perfect. Tear-jerkingly effective
Dreamy prose . . . Baby's unique voice and the glimmer of hope provided by her intelligence and imaginative spirit live on in the mind long after you have closed the book
Heather O'Neill's style is laced with so much sublime possibility and merciless actuality that it makes me think of comets and live wires
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