Related to: 'The Great Philosophers'

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for the New Yorker since 1986. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism, and the George Polk Award for magazine reporting. From 1995 to 2000 he lived in Paris; he now lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

Alan Forrest

Alan Forrest is Professor of Modern History and Director of the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies. He works on modern French history, especially the period of the French Revolution and Empire, and on the history of modern warfare. He serves on the editorial boards of French History and War in History, and is a member of the advisory committee for Annales historiques de la Revolution Française.

Alev Scott

Alev Scott was born in London in 1987 to a Turkish mother and a British father. She studied Classics at Oxford before working in London as an assistant director in theatre and opera. In 2011 she moved to Istanbul, where she taught Latin at the Bosphorus University. Her first book, Turkish Awakening, was published in 2014. Alev writes for numerous publications, including the Guardian.

Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts is a biographer and historian of international renown whose books include EMINENT CHURCHILLIANS and SALISBURY: VICTORIAN TITAN (awarded the Wolfson Prize for History). His recent book NAPOLEON THE GREAT won the Grand Prix of the Fondation Napoléon. Roberts is a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Literature and Arts. He appears regularly on British television and radio and writes for a number of national newspapers.

Ashley Jackson

Dr Ashley Jackson is a senior lecturer in the Defence Studies Department at King's College, London. He completed his doctorate at New College, Oxford in 1996. His research concentrates on the history of empire, particularly the British Empire.

Ben Dupre

Ben Dupré read Classics at Exeter College, Oxford before pursuing a career in reference publishing. He was Children's Reference Publisher at Oxford University Press from 1992 until 2004 and, all told, has more than 20 years' experience of bringing complex and challenging concepts to the widest possible audience.

Brian Moynahan

Brian Moynahan was a foreign correspondent and European editor with the Sunday Times. His many books include The Faith: A History of Christianity, The Russian Century, Comrades, The Claws of the Bear, Rasputin, William Tyndale, Forgotten Soldiers and Leningrad: Siege and Symphony. He died on 1st April 2018.

Christy Lefteri

Christy Lefteri was born in London in 1980 to Greek Cypriot parents who moved to London in 1974 during the Turkish invasion. She completed a degree in English and a Masters in creative writing at Brunel University. She taught English to foreign students and then became a secondary school teacher before leaving to pursue a PhD and to write. She is also studying to become a psychotherapist.

Claudia Gold

Claudia Gold holds a masters degree in medieval history. A former TV documentary researcher, she is currently working on The Maypole, a biography of Melusina von Schulenberg, mistress of King George I, to be published by Quercus in 2009.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Godfrey Hodgson

Godfrey Hodgson has worked as a journalist for newspapers, magazines, radio and television in Britain and the United States. Born in 1934, he trained as an historian at Oxford and the University of Pennsylvania, and has written a number of books, most of them about 20th-century American history.

Ian Crofton

A former editor-in-chief of The Guinness Encyclopedia, Ian Crofton's authorial credits include Brewer's Britain and Ireland (2005) and the forthcoming 2nd edition of Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable (with John Ayto). He lives in North London with his family.

Ingrid Carlberg

Ingrid Carlberg is a Swedish author and journalist. Her book about the life and destiny of Raoul Wallenberg was awarded the August Prize for best work of non-fiction 2012. Her biography was also awarded the Swedish Academy's Axel Hirsch Prize in 2013. Ingrid Carlberg worked at the Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter from 1990 to 2010, specializing in investigative and narrative journalism. She has a honorary doctorate at Uppsala University, awarded for her book The Pill, 2008. This historical narrative about the history of antidepressants also recieved the Swedish journalistic prize Guldspaden 2008, for best work of investigative journalism. Between 2012 and 2013, Carlberg was a guest professor in journalism at the University of Gothenburg.

Jad Adams

Jad Adams is an independent historian working as an author and television producer. His books include Kipling (2006) and The Dynasty: The Nehru-Gandhi Story (1997). He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and is currently a Visiting Research Fellow of the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Jeremy Harwood

Jeremy Harwood has written widely on many historical topics, ranging from key developments in human thought to history's unresolved mysteries. Among his recent books are five volumes surveying the political and social history of Britain from mid-Victorian times to the end of the 20th century and a study of the philosophic origins of Freemasonry.

John Bew

John Bew teaches History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King's College London. He was the winner of the 2015 Philip Leverhulme Prize for outstanding achievement in Politics and International Studies and previously held the Henry Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress in Washington DC. John is a contributing writer at the New Statesman and the author of five books, including the critically-acclaimed Realpolitik: A History and Castlereagh. He was born in Belfast, educated at Cambridge, and lives in Wimbledon, London.

John Haywood

Dr John Haywood is a Cambridge-educated expert on the history of Dark Age Europe. His authorial credits include The Cassell Atlas of World History and The Penguin Atlas of the Vikings.

Julian Baggini

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books including The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta), and most recently The Edge of Reason (Yale). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think-tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. His website is www.microphilosophy.net

Lyuba Vinogradova

Dr Lyuba Vinogradova was born in Moscow in 1973. After graduating from the Moscow Agricultural Academy with a PhD in microbiology, she took a second degree in foreign languages. In 1995 she was introduced to Antony Beevor and helped him research Stalingrad. Since then she has worked on many other research projects, and is the co-author (together with Beevor) of A Writer at War: Vasily Grossman with the Red Army. Her book about Russian women fighter pilots, Defending the Motherland, a companion volume to this, was published in 2015, with an introduction by Antony Beevor

Marcus Weeks

Marcus Weeks is the author of the hugely successful Philosophy in Minutes, Psychology in Minutes and Politics in Minutes. He has written numerous other books and contributed to prestigious reference works such as The Philosophy Book, the Millennium Encyclopedia and the Definitive Visual Guide series.