Related to: 'The Maths Handbook'

Quercus

How to Count to Infinity

Marcus du Sautoy
Authors:
Marcus du Sautoy

Do something amazing and learn a new skill thanks to the Little Ways to Live a Big Life books! Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it... Not falling in love, but counting. Animals and humans have been using numbers to navigate their way through the jungle of life ever since we all evolved on this planet. But this book will help you to do something that humans have only recently understood how to do: to count to regions that no animal has ever reached. By the end of this book you'll be able to count to infinity...and beyond.On our way to infinity we'll discover how the ancient Babylonians used their bodies to count to 60 (which gave us 60 minutes in the hour), how the number zero was only discovered in the 7th century by Indian mathematicians contemplating the void, why in China going into the red meant your numbers had gone negative and why numbers might be our best language for communicating with alien life.But for millennia contemplating infinity has sent even the greatest minds into a spin. Then at the end of the nineteenth century mathematicians discovered a way to think about infinity that revealed that it is a number that we can count. Not only that. They found that there are an infinite number of infinities, some bigger than others. Just using the finite neurons in your brain and the finite pages in this book, you'll have your mind blown discovering the secret of how to count to infinity.

Quercus

How To Understand E =mc²

Christophe Galfard
Authors:
Christophe Galfard

Do something amazing and learn a new skill thanks to the Little Ways to Live a Big Life books! The beginning of the 20th century heralded a scientific revolution: what a few brilliant minds uncovered about our reality in the first twenty years has shaped the history of our species. And one of them in particular stands out: Einstein, with his celebrated E=mc2.In this remarkable and insightful book, Christophe Galfard describes how E=mc2 is a direct consequence of the Theory of Special Relativity, the theory of how objects move and behave, at speeds close to the speed of light. He considers Einstein's legacy in the light of the 21st century, with fresh hindsight, and considers its impact on our vision of reality. The reader will discover that far from being just a formula, it is a brand new understanding of the nature of space and time.Some of the greatest scientific breakthroughs in the history of science have been made by geniuses who managed to merge and unite hitherto separated domains of knowledge. Galfard explores two unifications with Einstein's theories, and looks at the even bigger picture of how E=mc2 has changed our world, and what it entails for the future.Throughout, Galfard takes the reader on an extremely entertaining journey, using simple, jargon-free language to help the reader gain a deeper understanding of science. With humour and patience, he guides us through the world of particles, anti-matter and much more to bring us closer to an ultimate understanding of reality as we understand it today.

Quercus

Numericon

Marianne Freiberger, Rachel Thomas
Authors:
Marianne Freiberger, Rachel Thomas

Quercus

Numericon

Marianne Freiberger, Rachel Thomas
Authors:
Marianne Freiberger, Rachel Thomas

Quercus

50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

Who invented zero? Why 60 seconds in a minute? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? And can a butterfly's wings really cause a storm on the far side of the world? In 50 Maths Ideas You Really Need to Know, Professor Tony Crilly explains in 50 clear and concise essays the mathematical concepts - ancient and modern, theoretical and practical, everyday and esoteric - that allow us to understand and shape the world around us. Packed with diagrams, examples and anecdotes, this book is the perfect overview of this often daunting but always essential subject. For once, mathematics couldn't be simpler. Contents include: Origins of mathematics, from Egyptian fractions to Roman numerals; Pi and primes, Fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio; What calculus, statistics and algebra can actually do; The very real uses of imaginary numbers; The Big Ideas of relativity, Chaos theory, Fractals, Genetics and hyperspace; The reasoning behind Sudoku and code cracking, Lotteries and gambling, Money management and compound interest; Solving of Fermat's last theorem and the million-dollar question of the Riemann hypothesis.

Quercus

How Big is Infinity?

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

Quercus

Mathematics

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes
Quercus

Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes
Quercus

Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes
Quercus

How to Solve the Da Vinci Code

Richard Elwes
Authors:
Richard Elwes

Can you outrun a bullet? How do you build an electronic brain? Is it possible to create an unbreakable code? Could you slow down time? How do you unleash chaos? If you thought mathematics was all about measuring angles in a triangle or factorizing equations, think again ... How to Build a Brain and 34 Other Really Interesting Uses of Mathematics demystifies the astonishing world of maths in a series of intriguing, entertaining and often extraordinary scenarios - that explain key concepts in plain and simple language. You'll find out how to unknot your DNA, how to count like a supercomputer and how to become famous for solving mathematics most challenging problem. You'll learn essential survival skills such as how to survive in a whirlpool, how to slay a mathematical monster and how to be alive and dead at the same time. And along the way you'll discover some plain old cool stuff like how to unleash chaos, how to create an unbreakable code and how to use the mathematics to win at roulette or avoid going to prison. So if you want to get to grips with the great questions of number theory and geometry, the mysteries of the prime numbers or Plato's classification of regular polyhedra, or if you are really more interested in learning how to have beautiful children or how to make a million on the stock market, this is the perfect introduction to the fascinating world of modern mathematics.

Quercus

Maths in Minutes

Paul Glendinning
Authors:
Paul Glendinning
Quercus

Maths in Minutes

Paul Glendinning
Authors:
Paul Glendinning

Both simple and accessible, Maths in Minutes is a visually led introduction to 200 key mathematical ideas. Each concept is quick and easy to remember, described by means of an easy-to-understand picture and a maximum 200-word explanation. Concepts span all of the key areas of mathematics, including Fundamentals of Mathematics, Sets and Numbers, Geometry, Equations, Limits, Functions and Calculus, Vectors and Algebra, Complex Numbers, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Metrics and Measures and Topology.

Quercus

The Big Questions: Mathematics

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

The Big Questions series is designed to let renowned experts address the 20 most fundamental and frequently asked questions of a major branch of science or philosophy. Each 3000-word essay simply and concisely examines a question that has eternally perplexed enquiring minds, and provides answers from history's great thinkers. This ambitious project is a unique distillation of humanity's best ideas. In Big Questions: Mathematics, Tony Crilly answers the 20 key questions: What is maths for? Where do numbers come from? Why are primes the atoms of maths? What are the strangest numbers? Are imaginary numbers real? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? What is the maths of the universe? Are statistics lies? Can maths guarantee riches? Is there a formula for everything? Why are three dimensions not enough? Can a butterfly's wings really cause a hurricane? Can we create an unbreakable code? Is maths beauty? Can maths predict the future? What shape is the universe? What is symmetry? Is maths true? Is there anything left to solve?

Quercus

Maths 1001

Dr Richard Elwes
Authors:
Dr Richard Elwes

Paul Glendinning

Paul Glendinning is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Manchester. He was a student and a lecturer at Cambridge before moving to a chair at Queen Mary, University of London and then Manchester (UMIST). He was founding Head of School for Mathematics at the combined University of Manchester and has published over fifty academic articles and an undergraduate textbook on chaos theory.

Rachel Thomas

Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas are the Editors of Plus Magazine (plus.maths.org), a free online magazine opening a door to the world of maths for the general public. Before joining Plus in 2005, Marianne did a PhD in pure mathematics, followed by three years as a postdoc at Queen Mary, University of London. She has also been Editor-in-Chief of the mathscareers website. Rachel worked as a maths consultant for business, government and industry, after completing her Masters in pure mathematics at the University of Western Australia. She has edited the Gazette of the Australian Maths Society and designed mathematical walking tours with Marcus du Sautoy for Maths in the City. Rachel and Marianne were also editors of the popular maths book 50: Visions of Mathematics (OUP, 2014).

Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Elwes is a writer, teacher and researcher in Mathematics and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Leeds. He contributes to New Scientist and Plus Magazine and publishes research on model theory. Dr Elwes is a committed populariser of mathematics which he regularly promotes at public lectures and on radio. He is the author of Mathematics 1001 published by Quercus.

Tony Crilly

Tony Crilly is Reader in Mathematical Sciences at Middlesex University, having previously taught at the University of Michigan, the City University in Hong Kong, and the Open University. His principal research interest is the history of mathematics, and he has written and edited many works on fractals, chaos and computing. He is the author of the acclaimed biography of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley.

Dr Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Okura Elwes is a writer, teacher, and researcher in mathematics and a Senior Teaching Fellow at University of Leeds, UK. He is the author of the books How to Build a Brain, The Maths Handbook, Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs, and Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes (all published by Quercus), and has written for New Scientist and Plus Magazine. His research interests include mathematical logic and random processes.

Marcus du Sautoy

Marcus du Sautoy is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford where he holds the prestigious Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science and is a Fellow of New College.Du Sautoy has received a number of awards for his work including the London Mathematical Society's Berwick Prize for outstanding mathematical research and the Royal Society of London's Michael Faraday Prize for 'excellence in communicating science'. He has been awarded an OBE for his services to science and was recently elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.His mathematical research has covered a great many areas including group theory, number theory and model theory, but he has been equally successful in his promotion of mathematics to the general public. He has published a number of best-selling, non-academic books and appears regularly on television and radio.