Related to: 'Taming the Infinite'

Quercus

50 Science Ideas You Really Need to Know

Gail Dixon, Paul Parsons
Authors:
Gail Dixon, Paul Parsons

50 Science Ideas You Really Need to Know is your guide to the biggest questions and deepest concepts from across the whole of science. What was the Big Bang? How did life on Earth arise? What does quantum mechanics tell us about the universe? Is true artificial intelligence possible? And does life exist on other planets? Moving from the basics of atoms and molecules, Newton's laws of physics and the building blocks of life to the cutting edge of nanotechnology, Einstein's theories of relativity and cloning, this book makes the many worlds of science accessible and illuminating. Featuring fifty concise, insightful and illustrated essays covering physics and astronomy, Earth and life sciences, chemistry and materials, psychology and computing, and exploring the ways they connect with each other and impact on our lives, 50 Science Ideas You Really Need to Know is the ideal introduction to the questions which fascinate us all.

Quercus

The Story of Medicine

Mary Dobson
Authors:
Mary Dobson
Quercus

The Future: 50 Ideas You Really Need to Know

Richard Watson
Authors:
Richard Watson
Quercus

Born Liars

Ian Leslie
Authors:
Ian Leslie
Quercus

The Big Questions: Mathematics

Tony Crilly
Authors:
Tony Crilly

The Big Questions series is designed to let renowned experts address the 20 most fundamental and frequently asked questions of a major branch of science or philosophy. Each 3000-word essay simply and concisely examines a question that has eternally perplexed enquiring minds, and provides answers from history's great thinkers. This ambitious project is a unique distillation of humanity's best ideas. In Big Questions: Mathematics, Tony Crilly answers the 20 key questions: What is maths for? Where do numbers come from? Why are primes the atoms of maths? What are the strangest numbers? Are imaginary numbers real? How big is infinity? Where do parallel lines meet? What is the maths of the universe? Are statistics lies? Can maths guarantee riches? Is there a formula for everything? Why are three dimensions not enough? Can a butterfly's wings really cause a hurricane? Can we create an unbreakable code? Is maths beauty? Can maths predict the future? What shape is the universe? What is symmetry? Is maths true? Is there anything left to solve?

Quercus

The Doomsday Handbook

Alok Jha
Authors:
Alok Jha

Alok Jha

Alok Jha is a science journalist based in London. He has worked as a science correspondent for the Guardian and ITN, and made science programmes for BBC TV and radio

Ben Dupre

Ben Dupré read Classics at Exeter College, Oxford before pursuing a career in reference publishing. He was Children's Reference Publisher at Oxford University Press from 1992 until 2004 and, all told, has more than 20 years' experience of bringing complex and challenging concepts to the widest possible audience.

Dr Richard Elwes

Dr Richard Okura Elwes is a writer, teacher, and researcher in mathematics and a Senior Teaching Fellow at University of Leeds, UK. He is the author of the books How to Build a Brain, The Maths Handbook, Maths in 100 Key Breakthroughs, and Chaotic Fishponds and Mirror Universes (all published by Quercus), and has written for New Scientist and Plus Magazine. His research interests include mathematical logic and random processes.

Giles Sparrow

Giles Sparrow studied Astronomy at University College London, and works as an editor specializing in popular science. He is the author of - amongst other books - The Genius Test, The Universe and How To See It, The Stargazer's Handbook and Hubble: Window on the Universe and was a major contributor to Dorling Kindersley's Universe.

Ian Leslie

Ian Leslie lives in London, combining careers in advertising and writing. His first book, To Be President (Politicos, 2008), was described by Adam Boulton as 'brilliantly capturing the drama and emotion of Obama's successful run for the White House' and was extracted by Granta. He regularly appears as an analyst of American politics on Sky and the BBC. He has written about politics, culture, marketing, and psychology for Prospect, the Guardian and The Times.

Joanne Baker

Joanne Baker studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge and took her PhD at the University of Sydney in 1995. She is a physical science editor at Science magazine, where her speciality is space and earth science.

Julian Baggini

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books including The Pig That Wants to be Eaten, The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta), and most recently The Edge of Reason (Yale). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think-tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. His website is www.microphilosophy.net

Kit Yates

Kit Yates is a Senior Lecturer in mathematical biology at the University of Bath. His job consists of taking real-world phenomena and uncovering the mathematical truths that lie behind them. He extracts the common patterns that underlie these processes and communicates them. He works in applications as diverse as embryonic disease, the patterns on eggshells and the devastating swarming of locust plagues - teasing out the mathematical connections in the process.

Martin Redfern

Martin Redfern is a senior producer in the BBC Radio Science Unit. He joined the BBC as a studio manager after graduating from University College, London, where he studied geology. He has spent time as a science producer in TV and as science news editor for BBC World Service. Most of his work now is on science feature programs for Radio 4. He has written extensively on science for magazines and newspapers.

Matteo Civaschi

H-57 is a design and advertising studio based in Milan. After fifteen years of experience working on big international advertising campaigns for print, TV, web and radio, Gianmarco Milesi and Matteo Civaschi reinvented themselves as a bespoke design agency, focusing on contemporary design, typography and illustration. They are also the brains behind the infographic 'History of...' series, which has amassed worldwide popularity online.

Rachel Thomas

Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas are the Editors of Plus Magazine (plus.maths.org), a free online magazine opening a door to the world of maths for the general public. Before joining Plus in 2005, Marianne did a PhD in pure mathematics, followed by three years as a postdoc at Queen Mary, University of London. She has also been Editor-in-Chief of the mathscareers website. Rachel worked as a maths consultant for business, government and industry, after completing her Masters in pure mathematics at the University of Western Australia. She has edited the Gazette of the Australian Maths Society and designed mathematical walking tours with Marcus du Sautoy for Maths in the City. Rachel and Marianne were also editors of the popular maths book 50: Visions of Mathematics (OUP, 2014).

Rita Carter

Rita Carter is a renowned science writer who has twice been awarded the Medical Journalists' Association prize for outstanding contributions to medical journalism. She is the author of Mapping the Mind and The People You Are and has been shortlisted for the Rhone-Poulenc Prize for Science Books. She is a frequent speaker on the topics of consciousness and behaviour at seminars and conferences worldwide.

Sean B. Carroll

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Tony Crilly

Tony Crilly is Reader in Mathematical Sciences at Middlesex University, having previously taught at the University of Michigan, the City University in Hong Kong, and the Open University. His principal research interest is the history of mathematics, and he has written and edited many works on fractals, chaos and computing. He is the author of the acclaimed biography of the English mathematician Arthur Cayley.