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pulps

On This Day: John Glasby Died

John Stephen Glasby died on this day in 2011. Born in 1928, and a gradu­ate from Nottingham University with an honours degree in Chemistry, he started his career as a research chemist for I.C.I. in 1952, and worked for them until his retirement. Over the next two decades, he began a parallel career as an […]

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Related Categories: Anniversaries, Authors

On This Day: Walter B. Gibson Died

Walter B. Gibson may not be terribly well known, today, but for almost twenty years around the middle of last century, he was one of the most popular authors in the world. Writing under a bewildering aray of house names – John Abbington, Andy Adams, Ishi Black, Douglas Brown, C B Crowe, Felix Fairfax, Wilber […]

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Related Categories: Anniversaries, Authors

Galactic Journey: Store of Infinity

We began the week with a nod to the wonderful Galactic Journey and have decided to bookend our first week back with another post from the same source. As we’re sure you know by now, Galactic Journey is the journal of an intrepid time traveller, who is reviewing the 1960’s SF magazines as if they were […]

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Related Categories: Commentary, Reviews
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New Title Spotlight: Supernatural Stories featuring The Phantom Crusader

A little over two years ago, we dipped our pen in purple ink and proclaimed thusly: Have you ever thrilled to the SF adventures of Lionel Roberts?  Raced breakneck through the breathless prose of Leo Brett?  Indulged in the macabre tales of Bron Fane 0r the galaxy-spanning stories of Pel Torro? Does the name John […]

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Related Categories: Authors, New Releases, Whimsy

On This Day: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs was born on this day in 1875, and although one-hundred-and-forty years have passed, if you were asked to tick off famous fictional characters on your fingers, chances are that before you made it to your second hand you’d name his signature character. There’s a very good argument to be made for Tarzan […]

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Related Categories: Authors, Commentary

In Praise of . . . Galactic Journey

Your friendly neighbourhood SF Gateway received an email last week. Nothing unusual about that, of course, except . . . this one appeared to originate in the past. Exactly 55 years in the past, to be precise. The sender thanked us for our work in returning classic SF to availability (a pleasure!) and wondered if […]

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New Book of the Week: Saturn Patrol

Back in the ’50s, when novels could be 40,000 words long and the pulps ruled the world, publishing was a very different beast than it is now.  Dozens of short, purpose-written books were published out each month, in popular genres such as Romance, Crime, War Stories, Westerns and, of course, Science Fiction. The writers for […]

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Related Categories: Commentary, New Releases, Publishing
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From the Archives: In Praise of . . . Interzone

As we come to the end of a summer that’s seen London busy with the second Nine Worlds Geekfest, hosting the largest World Science Fiction Convention in history and put on the inaugural (and very successful!) Gollancz Festival, the gnomes who run the SF Gateway have need of a rest. But rather than leave you […]

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Related Categories: Commentary, In Praise of, Uncategorized

New Book of the Week: The Iron Dream

Every now and then in SF literature, an author throws you a googlie / curve ball (delete according to local cultural affinity to cricket or baseball; if you follow neither sport, we’re afraid you’re on your own). The Iron Dream is one of those occasions. A metafictional 1972 alternate history novel, based around a nested […]

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Related Categories: Commentary, New Releases

In Praise of . . . Interzone

The history of classic science fiction (in which SF Gateway has some small interest …) is, in many ways, the history of the pulp magazines. From the beginning of the modern field, in which they were the only realistic avenue for publication, through the Golden Age as exemplified by John W. Campbell‘s influential run on […]

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Related Categories: Commentary, In Praise of

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